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HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



L'.\I\LR,SITV OF 
TORONTO PRESS 



(<^S>] 



THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY 

FOUNDED BY JAMES LOEB, LL.D. 

EDITED BY 
t'r. R. PAGE, C.H., LITT.D. 

E. CAPPS, PH.D., LL.D. W. H. D. ROUSE, lift.d. 



REMAINS OF OLD LATIN 

III 

LUCILIUS 
THE TWEL\ E TABLES 



EEMAINS OF OLD 
LATIN 

. g,EWLY,<EDITED AXD TRANSLATED BY 

eT'h.^'WARMINGTGN, M.A., RR.Hist.S. 

PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON, 
BIRKBECK COLLEGE 

IN FOUR VOLUMES 
III 

LUCILIUS 
THE TWELVE TABLES 




LONDON 

WILLIAM HEINEMANN LTD 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS 

MCMXXXVIII 






Printed in Great Britain 



CONTEXTS 

PAGE 

INTRODTJCTIOX vii 

LUCILIUS 2 



WORDS AND PHRASES OF LUCTLIUS NOT INCLUDED IN 

THE TEXT OR NOTES OF THIS VOLUME . . .418 



THE TWELVE TABLES OR THE LAW OF THE TWELVE 

TABLES 424 



CONCORDANCES — 

I. — LUCILIUS [for ref. from Marx's ed. to this) . . 516 

n. — LUCILIUS {for ref. from this ed. to Marx's) . . 528 

INDEX 541 



INTRODUCTION 

Widened scope of this series of ' Remains.' Nonins 

In the introduction to the first volume of this series 
of Remains of Old Latin it was stated (pp. vii-viii) 
that there would be three volumes ; that, of literary 
remains, fragments of poets only would be included; 
and that the third volume would contain Lucilius and 
old Latin inscriptions. But a change in plan has 
now been made, so as to include the Twelve Tables 
of Roman Law, without excluding inscriptions of a 
' readable ' length down to 80 b.c. The series there- 
fore contains four volumes instead of three, Lucilius 
and the Twelve Tables being assigned to this volume 
— the third — the inscriptions to the fourth. Pages 
vii-viii of the introduction to volume I, and the title- 
pages of volumes I and II, no longer describe the 
scope of the series accurately. This is to be regretted, 
but the change is for the better. 

Lucilius the first Roman satirist has received con- 
siderable attention lately. Since Marx's monu- 
mental edition there have been not only articles in 
periodicals, and other special studies, but also the 
new text and study by Terzaghi, and the translation, 
with text, of Bolisani. And now comes this text and 
translation for English-speaking readers. The mere 
scraps that remain of Lucilius' work seem to 
fascinate ; at the same time also they offer the 



INTRODUCTION 

translator a difficult and some may think a thankless 
task. To a greater extent than with the other poets 
included in this series we are faced Mith the 
problems : What did the poet ^vrite here ? What 
did he mean? Often in dealing with a fragment 
one or both of these questions are unanswerable, 
even though we suggest answers. But, in spite of 
this, a collection of fragments, with a translation, 
will help in producing a greater knowledge and 
better understanding of the poet. This I have tried 
to provide for English-speaking readers. 

While the sources for Lucilius are of the same kind 
as provide the fragments of the poets given in volumes 
I and II of this series. Nonius is of particular import- 
ance, and especially with regard to books XXVI- 
XXX of Lucilius, both in point of quantity and in 
Nonius' method of quotation. It is clear (see p. xxi) 
that Nonius, or two slaves at his orders, used two 
large rolls of Lucilius' poems, one containing books 
XXVI-XXX, the other books I-XXI ; and that he 
nearly always quotes from the roll XXVI-XXX with 
the books in inverted order XXX-XXVI, and some- 
times uses the roll I-XXI in the same way. There 
are traces of the same method in the use of other 
authors also by Nonius. Marx explains this by 
suggesting that a slave of Nonius, finding the roll 
(after a previous perusal and annotation with a view to 
using it for his master's Doctrina) MOund round the 
wrong way, did not trouble to rewind it before using 
it again, but used it as he re-wound. This is quite a 
reasonable explanation. It may be right ; but in 
collocating any group of fragments in an order likely 
to be correct, it is not such a satisfactory theory as it 
looks, because, even if the roll was thus rewound 

viii 



INTRODUCTION 

and perused from end to beginning, it is hardly 
likely that each column was perused from bottom 
to top, even for the purpose of merely collecting 
passages marked, on the roll used by Nonius (for 
quotation in his Doctrind) or of collecting annotations 
written against its text. I have preferred, with- 
out being able to explain Nonius' reversal of the 
order of books, to assume that, in dealing ^vith each 
separate book of Lucilius, as distinct from two large 
rolls. Nonius or his slaves dealt with the books not 
from end to beginning, but in the ordinary way.* 
The result is groups of fragments whose order of 
presentation in Nonius' final text is the order in which 
we presume they stood in Lucilius' text. Marx, 
following his own theory, gives the fragments of each 
sequence or group in an order usually reverse when 
it is compared with mine. 

Life of Lucilius 

Gaius Lucilius was a Latin born ^ at Suessa 
Aurunca, which, situated on the borders of Campania, 
was in olden times an Oscan city, but had become a 
part oiLatium novum or adiectum. He appears to have 
belonged to a class corresponding to the equestrian 
order at Rome. The date of his birth is given by 
Jerome ^ as 148 b.c. ; but this is with probability 

" Cf. Marx, Lucil. Carni. Reliquiae, I, Proleg., LXXVIII ff. ; 
II, Praefatio, VI ff. ; Lindsay, Nonius Marcellus' Dictionary of 
Republican Latin (not Lindsay's ed. of Nonius' text), Oxford, 
1901. Nonius appears to have compiled his Doctrina from 
previously prepared word-lists drawn from various authors. 

^ Juvenal, I, 20 and Schol., ad loc, ; Auson., E}). ad Tetrad., 
XV, 9. 

<= Chrox. ad ann. Abr. 1870 (1869 c^L Amand.). 

ix 



INTRODUCTION 

regarded as false. That date would imj^ly that his 
service in the Numantine War (see below) took place 
when he was only fourteen years old ; again, Horace " 
says that Ivucilius' Satires reveal very fully the life ' of 
an old man ' ; and the probable chronology of the 
various books of Satires, and the death of Lucilius 
about 102 B.C., conflict with so late a date as 148 this 
is brought into relation with Horace's statement, 
freely though the word senex may be used. The right 
date of Lucilius, birth would appear to be 180 b.c, 
when there were consuls in Rome bearing names 
similar to the consuls of the year 148.^ So far as we 
can tell, Lucilius never became a Roman citizen and 
never married. But he was great-uncle to Pompey 
the Great, whose grandmother was sister of Lucilius,'' 
while Lucilius' brother was a wealthy Roman citizen 
and a senator, whose daughter married Gnaeus 
Pompeius Strabo. Gains was well-educated, as is 
clear from the fragments of his work. These likewise 
show that he came to own, at least in Italy and 
probably also in Sicily and Sardinia,'^ estates on which 
he was served by Aristocrates a bailiff, by Pacilius a 
treasurer, and possibly also by Symmachus a plough- 
man and by one Metrophanes.^ 

« S., II, 1, 34. 

^ Cf. Haupt, Jahrh. f. Phil. u. Pad., CVII (187.3), 72, 365. 
Munro, A. J. Phil., VIII, 16 argues for the year 168 as 
the right date. Cf. Marx, Prolegomena, XXIII. Bolisani, 
Lucilio, 22 ff. accepts Jerome's. 

<^ Schol., ad Hor., 8., II, 1, 29, 75; Porphyrio and Aero, 
ad Hor., S. II, 1, 75 (cf. Vellei. Paterc, II, 29, 2, inaccurate). 
For Collyra, Cretaea, Hymnis (mistresses) see pp. 194, 287-9, 

<* See pp. 30, 89, 203, 211 ; Cicero, de Or., II, 284; Sicily : 
Marx, ad XXVI, 667. 

" See pp. 44-5, 164-5, 196-7. 



INTRODUCTION 

But the greater part of his manliood was spent in 
Rome. When he first came to the city and Hved 
there we do not know. It is held by many, on the 
evidence of hne 453, inde venit Romam tener ipse etiam 
atque puellus, that he first came when he was quite 
young ; but this sentence appears in fact to refer to 
someone else." In 155 b.c. Clitomachus the Sceptic 
of Carthage, who became president of the New 
Academy and died in 110, was in Rome for a time; 
and here perhaps, but not necessarily,'' met Lucilius 
of whom he became a friend, sending him later on a 
book containing teachings of Carneades. This man 
likewise was in Rome in 155 with Critolaus and 
Diogenes.*^ Thus Lucilius knew some of the best 
thinkers of his age. His chief political friends were 
likewise of this sort. The closest of these was the 
military general and statesman Scipio Aemilianus. 
In 134, probably as one of the horsemen which the 
town Suessa had to provide,^ or possibly because he 
was, as a friend, chosen to be one by Scipio, he went 
as gentleman-attendant ^ of Scipio himself to the 
Numantine War in Spain,/ where he seems to have 
helped Scipio with money as well as soldiership. fi' 
We may assume that he returned to Rome late in 
133 and saw Scipio 's triumph in 132. Rome was 
now disturbed by troubles surrounding the violent 
death of the reformer Tiberius Gracchus ; Lucilius 
may have been adversely affected by re-distributions 
of land begun by Tiberius' land-commissioners, and 
must have followed with great interest the growing 

« See pp. 142-3. " Cf. BoHsani, p. 35. 

<= Cicero, Acad., II, 102, 137. <^ Livy, XXIX, 1.5. 
" contuhernalis in a limited sense. f VeUeius, II, 9, 3. 

[Plutarch], Apophth. Scip. Min., 15. 



INTRODUCTION 

demand of the Italians for Roman citizenship ; 
indeed LuciUus may well have been one of those 
Avho led Scipio to support the cause of Rome's 
dissatisfied Italian allies. 

Meanwhile he had begun his literary work, which 
from first to last took the form of ' Satura ' or 
* Medley.' ^ He had not published any Satires before 
the Numantine War, but he did soon after it.'' From 
evidence provided largely by the surviving fragments, 
but too lengthy for full discussion here, a roughly 
truthful outline can be given of the gradual output 
of his Mork. In 131 b.c. Lucilius completed his first 
books, which are now numbered books XXVI, 
XXVII, and XXVI 11,^ there being several satires in 
each book. In these books he tested his fitness for 
composition in three metres ; thus books XXVI and 
XXVII were wholly in septenarii, while book XXVIII 
contained both septenarii and se?iarii, and lastly hexa- 
meters. A little later, probably before the death of 
Scipio in 129 b.c..^ he finished book XXIX which 
was composed in septenarii, senarii (and other metres ?), 
and hexameters. After book XXIX Lucilius forsook 
the metres of the stage, and chose, for all the rest of 
his satires except a small collection of occasional 
poems, the metre which remained the most acceptable 
metre for Roman satire — the hexameter. This 

« :\Iarx, Frohg., IX ff., CXX fif. » VeUei., II, 9, 4. 

<^ The numbering of the books is explained below. The 
statement made by Lucilius in book XXVI (see pp. 208-9) 
that he does not want to be a tax-farmer of Asia has been 
taken to show that this book was written after the enactment 
of C. Gracchus in 123 B.C. about the province of Asia. 
But the tax-farmers doubtless took an interest in the province 
as soon as it was created in 133 B.C. 

" cf. Marx, Proleg., pp. XXX-XXXV. 

xii 



INTRODUCTION 

clearly was the metre in which LuciHus, after his 
earlier experiments, preferred to write. 

Political disturbances in Rome, connected with the 
demands of the Italians for Roman citizenship and 
leading up to the tribunates of Gains Gracchus in 
123-2 B.C., seem to have prevented the publication 
of further satires for some years. In 126 M. Junius 
Pennus passed a law which expelled from Rome all 
who were not citizens. Further action against non- 
citizens was taken by Gains Fannius in 122. Whether 
Lucilius M'as a victim or not of these acts is not known 
but probably he was. 

Book XXX. which Marx dates shortly before the 
death of Scipio in 129, appears in fact to have been 
written after the revolt of Fregellae in 125 B.C. (see 
p. 331). It contained hexameters only. Lucilius w^as 
already something of a Uterary figure. Each of the 
books mentioned above (perhaps even single satires) 
may have been pubHshed separately. Thus book 
XX\T may be addressed to a young historian un- 
known, book XX\ II to Scipio ; while in book XXX 
Lucilius seems to allude to his poems as the only ones 
which were popular." But in later ages they were 
to be found, on the market and in libraries, united in 
one volume which, as we shall see, may be called, not 
Volumen I, but, as will be explained below, Volumen II. 

After no traceable period of silence Lucilius 
wrote, perhaps in 123 e.c.,^ the first book of a new 

" See pp. 201, 220, 255, 353; but the evidence is quite 
inconclusive. 

^ The book was written soon after the death of Lentulus 
Lupus, which Marx puts in 126, Cichorius in 123 B.C. Cf. 
Marx, Proleg., XXXV-XL, XLV; Cichorius, Untersiichungen 
zu Lucilius, pp. 219-220; and pp. 2-3 of this book. Lupus 
may have died as early as 128 — BoUsani, 42-3. 

xiii 



INTRODUCTION 

scries of satires in twenty-one books of wliicli all 
were composed in hexameters, and appear now as 
books I-XXI for reasons which will be clear later on 
(see pp. xxi fF.-xxv. below^). Taking no part in political 
affairs, yet being in close touch with them, he com- 
posed a second book of the new group or series about 
119 B.C., after the accusation of Quintus Mucius 
Scaevola Augur by Albucius, which was reproduced in 
this book." About 118 b.c. (or perhaps earlier, when the 
anti-aliens law of Pennus was passed in 126), Lucilius 
went on a journey by land to Rhegium and then 
crossed apparently to Sicily and perhaps also to 
Sardinia. This particular journey through Italy is 
certain, while visits to Sicily and Sardinia can be 
deduced. If the poet had estates in Sicily, he may 
well have seen fit to visit them in view of long lasting 
troubles caused by the slave-rising 135-131 b.c. He 
gave an account of this journey in a third book.^ 
This book, and a fourth also, appeared probably in 
118 B.C. A fifth was written late in 117 or early in 
116, in which Lucilius attacked Gains Metellus 
Gaprarius, £i praetor designatus in 117.'' 

At this time, according to Lucilius himself, lines 
186 ff., he suffered from some ill health, perhaps a 
severe illness. He was now quite a well-known man, 
and the city was enjoying comparative peace in 
affairs of politics. This therefore was probably the 
time when he first became possessed of the house 
which had been built in Rome at the public expense 
for Antiochus IV Epiphanes (son of Antiochus III 

° Marx, XLI ff. 

^ See pp. 30 ff., 89, 203, 211; Marx, ad 9(3; Porphjn-io, ad 
Hor., S., I, 5, 1. 

<^ Marx, Proleg., XLVII-XLVIIl. 

xiv 



INTRODUCTION 

the Great)." At this period also LuciHus was insulted 
by an actor on the stage ; Lucihus sued him for 
damages, but Gaius Caecilius the judge acquitted the 
defendant.^ 

The subsequent fortunes of LuciHus are still 
vaguer. It appears that in his continued career as a 
satirist he had the natural experiences of such a man ; 
he was held in honour by some, but attacked by 
others. On an occasion between 114 and 111, one 
Lucilius (almost certainly the satirist), at a meeting 
of the Senate, when the public lands and the Lex 
Thoria were being discussed, was jeered at by Appius 
Claudius Pulcher and by adversaries Avho said that 
the pubUc lands were being pastured away by his 
flocks.*' Lucilius may have been present by per- 
mission at that meeting. Books of satires continued 
to be ^\Titten and issued. Between 116 and 110 
came book XI of the new series.^ There is some- 
thing to be said for the beUef that book XVII was 
written in 108 or thereabouts,^ but the matter is 
very doubtful. There is also evidence which leads 
us to suppose that book XX was written in 106. 
Lucihus was still A\Titing after 107,^ but in 105 he 
had given up, and in order to live in retirement and 
possibly to improve his health, retired to Naples. 

<* Asconius, ad Cic, Pison., 12, 9 K-S. The attribution of 
this event of Lucihus' hfe to this period is a guess of mine, 
but it seems a likely one. 

^ Ad Herennium, II, 13, 19. 

•^ Cicero, de Or., II, 284; Marx, XXI. 

** Marx, XLVIII. It may have been pubhshed after 110, 
when Lucius Opimius (see Unes 450-2) was condemned for 
accepting bribes from Jugurtha; see p. 143. 

* Marx, XLVIII-XLIX. 

f Cicero, Brutus, 160-1 ; Marx, XLIX-L. 

XV 
VOL. III. b 



INTRODUCTION 

Here perhaps he wrote the little elegiac poems, about 
his own slaves and freedmen, which were later — 
probably after his death — published as one separate 
(and non-satiric ?) work, and in course of time 
included in the satires, in the series of twenty-one 
books of hexameters, bringing that series up to 
twenty-five books. Here also at Naples he died in 
103, 102 or 101, and was honoured by a public 
funeral. '^ Thus the lifetime of Lucilius was the age 
which saw the spread of Rome's power over Greece, a 
steady increase of Greek influence in Italy, much 
inflow of wealth into Rome, the conquest of Spain, 
the destruction of Carthage, the stirring times of the 
Gracchi, the affair of Jugurtlia, and the dangers of 
Cimbric and Teutonic invaders from the north. 

As a poet Lucilius reflects many ideas of the 
Gracchan age at Rome, and amongst fellow-poets 
stands out as a one who owed little to Greek 
influence in the form which his poetry took. 
Although he took delight in the culture of the 
Greeks, and was familiar with Greek philosophers 
and philosophy, especially Epicurean, Cynic, and 
Stoic doctrines,^ he seems to have set himself against 
those writers who followed Greek models more than, 
as he thought, a Roman should; or it may be that 
he preferred the use of everyday speech, or some- 
thing like it, even in poetry of a serious kind. At 
any rate he criticized in his satires great poets like 
Ennius, and, far more severely perhaps, certain 

" Jerome, Chron. ad arm. Abr. 1914 = 102 B.C. (1915 cd. 
Amand. = 101 B.C.). Jerome, who has the date of Lucilius' 
birth wrong (see above), thus wrongly says he was in his 46th 
year. The date 102-101 is fairly certain ; Marx, XXII-XXTII. 

* See pp. 162, 207, 209, 213, 217, 221, 223, 226, 245, 264-5, 
311,359, 361, 389, 393. 
xvi 



INTRODUCTION 

writers of his own age, especially Pacuvius and 
Accius, and in particular the heavy style of diction in 
their tragedies." We have seen too how once he was 
insultingly addressed by an actor speaking from 
the stage. His greatest friend, with whom he, as a 
socius, was probably connected as with a patronus, 
was Scipio Aemilianus.^ Another close friend was 
C. Laelius (not Decimus Laelius of line 635). We 
read how in Scipio 's house Laelius once came upon 
Scipio while Lucilius was chasing Scipio round the 
couches of the dining-table, trying to hit him with a 
twisted napkin.^ Another friend was Junius Congus, 
probably he who died in 54 b.c.^^ Others were 
Clitomachus (see above, p. xi) ; a certain Pacenius, 
to whom Lucilius addressed a satire ; '' Quintus 
Laelius Archelaus and \ ettius Philocomus, who were 
helpful to Lucilius by hearing recitations of his works 
and making commentaries on them soon after his 
death ; / and one or two unknown persons to whom 
satires are addressed. 

Among adversaries are to be counted Q. Caecilius 
Metellus Macedonicus, censor in 131 b.c, whom 
Lucilius attacked to please Scipio ; L. Cornelius 

« See pp. 73, 214-5, 233 ff., 282-4, 413 (Pacuv.); 48-9, 
107, 114-5, 127-9, 236, 272-3, 344 (Accius); 126-7, 129-31, 
275, 285, 332, 385, 414-5 (Ennius) ; Horace, Sat., I, 10, 53 and 
Porphvrio's remark; Gellius, XVII, 21, 49; Vellei., II, 9, 3. 

^ 185-129 B.C. Vellei., II, 9, 4; Schol., ad Hor., Sat., II, 
1, 71 fF. ; index to this vol., s.v. Scipio Aemilianus. 

'^ SchoL, I.e. 

** Line 634. He was probably the unknown historian to 
whom Lucilius wrote a satire in book XXVI ; see pp. 220 if. 

'' p. 139. 

f Suet., de Grammat., 2; cf. Charis., ap. G.L., I, 141, 33 K; 
and cf. pp. 370-1. 



b2 



INTRODUCTION 

Lentulus Lupus, princeps senatus 131-125 ? " ; 
(apparently) also C. Caecilius Metellus Caprarius, 
son of Macedonicus, and praetor in 116^; Quintus 
Mucins Scaevola Augur, praetor in 121 or 120; 
L. Licinius Crassus, tribune in 107 '^ ; Quintus Granius, 
a public crier, and tribune in 107 '^; Lucius Opimius, 
consul in 121 and, as an ambassador, bribed by 
Jugurtha about 116 ^' ; and perhaps / Aulus Postumius 
Albinus, who was disgraced by Jugurtha in 110. 
Other !' enemies appear to have been C. Papirius 
Carbo, a supporter of Tiberius Gacchus and suspected 
of murdering Scipio ; and Hostilius Tubulus a 
corrupt judge. 

Lucilius went far ahead of his predecessors in the 
way in Mhich he mingled himself, his readers, and 
Roman life. He was the first to give a really literary 
presentation to ' satura,' ^ in M'hich he revealed 
much of his own life * besides dealing with other 
people. Anything whatever could become the 
subject of his satire — politics, letters to friends, a 
journey, social life and its problems, literary and 
dramatic criticism, even rules of spelling. Though 

« Hor., Sat., II, 1, 62 ff. ; Schol., ad Hor., Sat., II, 1, 67, 72, 
Persius, I, 114; cf. pp. 202-5, 260-1, and 2 ff. 

^ pp. 72-3. 

" Cicero, de Or., 1, 12; Brut., 160, Juv., I, 151. As Cicero 
indicates, Crassus may have been more or less friendly to 
Lucilius. 

<* Cicero, Brutus, 160-1 ; see pp. 140-1, 186-7, 190-1. 

* Line 450. 

■'■ Or Sp. Postumius Albinus; lines 1196-1208. But these 
lines may be addressed to a friend. 
<> For these, see pp. 370-1. 

* PHnv, N.H., praef., 7 ; Quintil., X, 1, 93 ; Horace, Sat., 
II, 1, 62 ff. 

< cf. Horace, Sat., II, 1, 30 ff. 



INTRODUCTION 

his own style received praise for various reasons ^ 
there is no doubt that he wrote careless and ofF-hand 
poetry, as he seems to have confessed himself,^ 
and that liis reputation rested chiefly on his satiric 
power. In this he was likened to the Greek poets of 
the Old Comedy ; by means of this — once again 
must be adduced the oft-quoted remark of Persius — 
he " lashed the city, and broke his jaw " on the 
objects of his attack ; through this he tore from them 
the decorous mask and uncovered the ugliness which 
lay underneath.^ Whatever his fiery temper 
demands, says Juvenal, he utters Avith direct sim- 
plicity, so that " whenever Lucilius in a blaze of 
passion roars upon a man with drawn sword, the 
hearer, whose mind is chilled with crimes, blushes 
while his heartstrings sweat with unspoken guilt." ^ 
He was variously referred to by posterity as learned, 
full of fun, witty, polished, agreeable, graceful, acute, 
free-minded, bitter, harsh. '^ He showed doubtless 
one or more of these qualities according to his 
feeling of the moment. At any rate it would be 
wrong to emphasise unduly his power of showing 

« Pliny, N.H., XXXVI, 185; Cicero, de Or., Ill, 171; 
Horace, Sat., II, 1, 28-9; Qiiintil., I, 18, 11; Fronto, Vol. 
I, p. 4, and II, p. 48 Haines {L.C.L.). 

•^ See pp. 366-7; Petron., 4; Apul., de deo Socr., I ; Horace, 
Sat., I, 4, 9 flf. ; I, 10, 64 ff. ; I, 10, 20 S. 

<= Persius, I, 114-5; Horace, Sat., II, 1, 62 ff. 

^ Juvenal, I, 151 ff. (165-7 quoted); cf. Horace, Sat., I, 4, 
Iff.; I, 10, 46; II, 1, 28; 68; 74; 211; Tacitus, Dialog., 
23; Persius, I, 23-5 ; Mart., XII, 94, 7). 

« Cicero, de Or., II, 25 ; I, 72 ; ad Fam., IX, 15, 2 ; Tre- 
bonius, to Cicero, in ad Fam., XII, 16, 3; Hor., Sat., I, 10, 
64; I, 4, 6; Porphyrio, ad Hor., Sat., 1, 3, 40; ad Ep., I, 
19, 34; Aero, ad Sat., I, 1; Pronto, Vol. II., p. 48 Haines 
(Loeb). Quintil., X, 1, 94; Varro, ap. Gell., VI, 14, 6. 

xix 



INTRODUCTION 

indignation. Though he may be said Mith truth to 
have been the first to make satire satiric, and seems 
to have foreshadowed the lofty and feverish indigna- 
tion of Juvenal, he was far more like Horace on that 
later poet's satiric side, who was therein inspired 
by Lucilius and imitated him. As often as not 
Lucilius was free-and-easy ; some of his satires, like 
Horace's, were sermones, ' talks ' or ' chats.' Lucilius 
himself looked on them as such. We see a man well 
acquainted with country-life, very fond of animals, 
particularly of horses and riding, who lived also in a 
big city and watched its society and politics. He 
seems to have been independent all his life, fond 
perhaps of leisure, at any rate disliking any kind of 
official position. Not perhaps enjoying the best of 
health, he was a happy and perhaps a generous man. 
As he said, he would not take the whole world and for 
it barter away his own self Gaius Lucilius." 

Early literary history of the text of Lucilius' ' Satires ' 

The surviving fragments of Lucilius, which amount 
to less than thirteen hundred lines or parts of lines, 
are relics of work which, at the time of its loss as a 
whole, consisted of thirty books ; this means here 
not thirty separate small rolls (volumina), but thirty 
convenient subdivisions of Lucilius' whole output. 
But, though grouping into books is apparently 
Lucilius' own throughout, the order in which these 
books were later arranged and now appear is not 
the order in which the poet wrote them. There are 
two groups, books XXVI-XXX, which were written 
first, and books I-XXI together with XXII-XXV, 

" pp. 208-9. 

XX 



INTRODUCTION 

which were written afterwards. Within the first 
group, and in books I-XXI within the second, the 
books are relatively in the right chronological order. 
About chronological order in books XX1I-XX\^ we 
know nothing. The history of this arrangement 
appears to be as follows. 

We have seen that Lucilius perhaps issued his 
satires in separate small books or rolls. In the course 
of time his whole output took the form of two large 
and one small rolls. In his own lifetime his earliest 
books, now XX\ I-XXX, were probably republished 
in one roll, perhaps in the year 124 b.c. It is fairly 
certain at any rate that at least the second series of 
books, consisting of books now numbered I-XXI, 
was published or re-published in one roll by Lucilius 
during his own lifetime (about 106 b.c. ?), if we accept 
the usual interpretation of Varro's words in his De 
Lingua Lathia, V, 17 Lucilius suorum uniiis et vigijiti 
librorum initiiim fecit hoc (\^arro then quotes line 1 of 
Book I) ; and this procedure is probably true of the 
first series also. It is clear that in the time of \ arro, 
who lived from 116 to 27 b.c, the series which now 
appears as books I-XXI formed a separate roll ; 
and when Nonius much later (about the beginning 
of the 4th century a.d.) compiled his [De\ Compen- 
diosa Doctriiia, he used, in quoting Lucilius, two 
separate rolls, one, containing books XX\T-XXX, to 
which he or a slave refers as ' Lucilius . . .'; and 
another, containing books I-XXI, to which he always 
refers as ' Lucilius Satyrarum . . .' ^ Gellius again 

" It might be suggested that Lucilius did not give the title 
Saturae to his earlier series. But the varying method of 
Nonius' slaves and of quotation by other sources makes it 
impossible to use the evidences of Nonius alone to support this. 

xxi 



INTRODLXTION 

(c. A.D. 130-180) quotes from books I-XX only. 
Gellius therefore seems to reproduce knowledge, or 
rather use, of one roll only of Lucilius. Books XXII- 
XXV, containing small poems, were doubtless first 
pubhshed after Lucilius' death (by his friend Vettius 
Philocomus r), all in one small roll. Its separate 
character is indicated partly by the establishment of 
the two large series, shown above, which did not 
include books XXII-XXV, and partly by the surviv- 
ing fragments of these books, which, scanty though 
they are, reveal, besides their special tone and 
elegiac metre, a common tendency for quoters to be 
satisfied with the earlier part of a roll — nearly all our 
fragments of books XXII-XXV come from book 
XXII. Nonius' quotations — three only — from this 
group all belong to book XXII, and were got by him 
from a glossary. 

All that I have said in the preceding paragraph 
refers only to the issue of all the satires of Lucilius 
by the author, or soon after his death, in three rolls. 
It does not, as any one can see, represent the 
numeration of the books, within these rolls, by 
Lucilius. It is natural to suppose that he numbered 
his books. That being accepted, he must have given 
the numbers I-V to the books which we know as 
XXVI-XXX; the books which we know as I-XXI 
he numbered either VI-XX\T, or (as may possibly 
be deduced from the passage of Varro ([uoted above) 
I-XXI of a Voliunen Secundum. In De Lingua Latina, 
VII, 47 Varro quotes three fragments of Lucilius 
from a grammarian who appears (though the evidence 
is slender) to have used a complete edition of 
Lucilius giving the books in the right chronological 
order. From this we may conclude that a complete 



INTRODUCTION 

edition (by Vettius :) of this kind was current between 
Lucilius' death and Varro's age. But there is no 
sign that this edition contained Lucihus' own 
numbering of his books, though it is natural to 
suppose that it did so. 

How then does it come about that the fragments 
of LuciUus, as they have ultimately come down to us, 
are arranged in an order of books which is chrono- 
logical not throughout, but only in two fused groups 
of which the second group (books XXVI-XXX) was 
composed by the author before the first group (books 
I-XXI together with XXII-XXV) .^ Nonius (early 
4th century a.d.) and other late authorities, beginning 
with Flavins Caper (2nd century a.d.) " — Nonius at 
least using two rolls and implying the existence of a 
third roll, as we have seen — quoted Lucilius from 
thirty books of which the books of the second group 
appear as books I-XXI together with XXII-XXV, 
and the books of the first as books XXVI-XXX. 
\ arro's mention of Lucilius' ' twenty-one books ' 
indicates that this arrangement dated before even 
his time, though the words ' twenty-one ' may mean 
not books already numbered, in editions of Lucilius' 
works, as I-XXI, but a series which happened to 
contain twenty-one books, yet may have been 
actually numbered in Varro's time VI-XXVI, 
according to Lucilius' own numbering as suggested 
above. Be that as it may, we can state that 
apparently before the Empire began, certainly 

" Marx, LII-LIII. Flavius Caper's use of the whole of 
Lucilius, with the books in the non-chronological order of 
groups, is known from later grammarians, especially Pris- 
cianus; but the groups or separate volumina are not dis- 
tinguishable in these grammarians. 

xxiii 



INTRODUCTION 

during the imperial period, there was in eircuhition a 
complete coUeetion of all Lucilius' satires, in three 
rolls, forming a standard edition which displaced all 
others. This edition, possibly by Publius Valerius 
Cato (born c. 100 B.C.), used an arrangement " 
according to metres, the first roll containing hexa- 
meters only, books I-XXI, another, a small roll, 
containing books XXII-XXV (elegiac poems), the 
last books, XX\T-XXX, containing all such satires 
as had been written in septeiiarii and se?iaru, chrono- 
logical principle being still strong enough to include 
in this roll, and probably in their proper place, 
such hexameters also as Lucilius himself included in 
his earliest satires. Within the first roll also chrono- 
logical order is preserved. It may be further that 
the copies in use in the imperial period all descended 
from a republican ' archetype ' or model copy of 
Valerius' (?) edition, and that this original had been 
damaged (after Varro wrote ?) at one end of the first 
volumen or roll, so that no writer (not even Nonius) 
quotes anything from book XXI, however frequently 
he may quote from books I-XX ; the theory that we 
have the title of book XXI, as indicated on pp. 194-5, 
being a guess. Of course this may be through 
chance, not damage ; even of book X\'III we have 
only two fragments, of XXIII one fragment, of XXIV 
none, of XXV one. But the books of elegiacs (XXII- 
XXV) were probably short, and lacked the typical 
interest of Lucilius' other work. Often the rolls 
were bought separately, especially the maturer work 
of books I-XXI (cf. Gellius' knowledge or use of this 
series only, and \'arro's mention of it), though in 

" Marx, LTV. It was the custom of critics to deal with 
hexameters before elegiacs, and both before other metres. 



INTRODUCTION 

imperial times the earlier work of books XXVI-XXX 
seems to have been valued equally with the later 
series books I-XXI. We may say then that, however 
much the order of the fragments in modern editions 
varies, these editions are a kind of skeleton of the 
* ediiio vulgaris ' which we have indicated above. 

Modern Editions and Translaiions of Liicilius 

F. Dousa. C. Liicilii . . . Satyrarum . . . reliquiae. 
F. Dousa collegit disposuit et notas addidit. Ley- 
den. 1597. 2nd ed. Amsterdam. 1661. 

E. F. Corpet. Satires de C. Lncilius. Fragments revus, 

augmentes, tradidts, et annotes. Paris. 1845. 

F. D. Gerlach. C Lucili Saturarum Reliqidae. 
Edidit, auxit, emeiidavit. Turin. 1846. 

L. Mueller. C. Lucili Saturarum Reliquiae. Accedunt 
Acci {praeter Scenica) et Suei carminum Reliquiae. 
Leipzig. Teubner. 1872. 

C. Lachmann. C. Lucili Saturarum [Reliquiae']. 
Carolus Lachmannus emendavit. After Lach- 
mann's death supplemented by M. Haupt and 
edited by J. Vahlen. Berlin. Reimer. 1876. 
To this was added, by F. Harder, Index Luci- 
lianus. Berlin. 1878. 

F. Marx. C Lucili Carminum Reliquiae. Recensuit 
enarravit F. Marx. Leipzig. Teubner. Vol. I, 
Prolegomena and Text. 1904. Vol. II, Com- 
mentary 1905. This is by far the best edition 
of Lucilius. In the apparatus criticus of this 
book Marx is referred to as M. 

E. Bolisani. Lucilio e i suoi Frammenti. Padua. 
Messaggero. 1932. Text. Italian translation. 
With introduction and short notes. 

XXV 



INTRODUCTION 

N. Terzaghi. C. Lvcilii Saturarum Reliquiae. In 
usum maxime Academicum digessit brevissimaque 
adnotatione critica instruxit N.T. Florence. F. 
Le Moniiier. 1934. A handy plain text. 

N. Terzaghi. Lucilio. Turin. L'Erma. 1934. This 
is, in fact, Terzaghi's commentary on his text. 

Fragments of Lucilius will be found in other books — 
e.g. R. Estienne, Fragm. Poet. Fet. Lat., 1564; 
Corpus Omn. Vet. Poet. Lat. Geneva. 1611 and 
1627 ; M. Maittaire, Opera et Fragm. Vet. Poet. 
Lat., London. 1713 and 1721 ; P. Amati, Collectio 
Pisaurensis. Pesaro. 1766; E. Diehl, Poet. 
Rom. Vet. Rel. Bonn. 1911. Kleine Texte, 69, 
pp. 102 fF. ; J. Wordsworth, Fragments and 
Specimens of Early Latin. Oxford. 1874 ; W. 
Merry, Selected Fragm. of Rom. Poetry. Oxford. 
1898. See Remains of Old Latin, Vol. II, pp. 
xxix ff. There is also one old translation into 
English by L. Evans, Bohn's Classical Library. 

Among the abbreviations used in this Volume are : 
C. (Cichorius, Untersuchungen Z2i Lucilius) ; C.Q. 
(Classical Quarterly) ; //. (llermes) ; G.G.A. 
{Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigcn) ; Rh. Mus. 
{Rheinisches Museum) ; W. St. (JViener Studien) ; 
A. J. P., or the like (American Journal of Phil- 
ology) ; T.A.P. {Transactions and Proceedings of 
the American Philological Association). The copies 
of Cod. Farn. IV. A. 3 (Festus) are indicated by 
apog. See also Remains, I, p. xxxiii. 

The Twelve Tables 

During the first part of the struggle between the 
patricians and the plebeians of the early Roman 

xxvi 



INTRODUCTION 

Republic — a struggle lasting from 509 to 287 B.C. — 
the plebeians were in ignorance of the Roman laws, 
which were a secret of the poiitijices and other 
patricians and were administered with unfair severity 
against plebeians. According to tradition, in 462 
a plebeian Terentihus proposed that there be pub- 
lished a legal code which should bind the magistrates 
and judges (who were at that time all patricians) in 
pronouncing their judicial decisions. For some years 
the patricians opposed this demand with success, but, 
after an alleged embassy to Athens to inspect the 
famous laws of Solon, in 451 a Board of Ten, to which 
plebeians were eligible but in fact were not elected, 
took the place of the consuls, and, M'ith some help 
given by Hermodorus of Ephesus," prepared a 
number of laws. These, when passed as an act of 
parUament '' by the Assembly of the people, were 
engraved on ten bronze ^ tablets and placed on view 
in the Forum. To complete the work, a second Board 
of Ten, in which plebeians seem to have shared, was 
appointed for the year 450. These drew up further 
laws which were inscribed on two more tablets. 
From the mass of myth which follows we can conclude 
that one of the Board, a far-sighted and democratic 
patrician Appius Claudius, tried to keep the Board in 

" Embassy :—Livy, III, 31-2; Dionys. Hal.. Ant. Rom., 
X, 51, 54, 57 (embassy also to Greek cities in Italv, which may 
be the truth) ; Cic, de Leg., II, 25, 64; Euseb., Sync, 484, 6'; 
Jerome, arm. Abr. 1565, Hermodorus : — Pompon., Dig., I, 
2, 2, 4; Phnv, N.H., XXXIV, 21; Strabo, XIV, 642; cf. 
also Diog. Laert., IX, 1, 2; Cic, Tusc. Disp., V, 36, 105. 

^ as a lex in a special poUtical sense — see below. 

'^ So say the sources, except Pomponius, Dig., I, 2, 2, 4 who 
says ehoreas (made of ivory), for which should perhaps be 
read roboreas (wooden). 



INTRODUCTION 

office, probably with the idea of effecting further 
reforms, but failed. In 449 the ordinary constitution 
(that is, with two consuls, not a Board of Ten), was 
restored and the two additional tablets were approved 
by the Assembly. The whole twelve tablets or 
tables were then approved as one Law or act of 
parliament, namely Lex Diiodecim Tabularum.'^ The 
plebeians noM' knew what the laws were. This code 
Mas not the fountain of all public and private law 
claimed for it by Livy, but largely an exposition of 
private law, drawn from already existing customary 
law^, and including some public and sacred law. It 
was a body of statutes drawn up for a community 
which consisted mostly of small landholders and 
possessed little commerce and little culture ; and 
from it development took place by interpretation * 
(begun by pontijices, and continued by jurists) and, 
after 367 B.C., by the accumulation of praetor's edicts. 
We can safely say that the code was thoroughly 
Roman in origin and was based largely on custom. 
But it took for granted, as known already, the 
institutions of the family, formal transactions like 
mancipations, wills, and so on, so that much of 
the law still remained customary and unwritten. 
Moreover, even if we reject the alleged embassy to 
Athens, the alleged borrowing from Solon's laws, 
and the alleged assistance from Hermodorus, still 
Greek influence was very probably present, as the 

" cf. Livy, III, 9-57; Dionvs. Hal., X, 1-60; Pomponius, 
Dig., I, 2, 2, .3, 4, 24; Cic, Repuhl., II, 36 ff.; Diodor., XTI, 
23-6; Tac, Ann., Ill, 27. 

* interprelatio included expansion and limitation of the 
laws' wording, the foi'niation of new doctrines, and so on, 
besides explanation. 

xxviii 



INTRODUCTION 

later Romans believed, if only tln-ough the Greek 
colonies in south Italy and in Sicily." 

Doubts have been thrown not only on the genuine- 
ness of the fragments, but even on the occurrence of 
any codification in 451-450 b.c. E. Pais ^ believes 
that there was no decemvirate in those years ; that 
the collection known as the Twelve Tables, after 
gradual compilation probably by means of legislation 
and publication, reached its final form at the end of 
the fourth century b.c. E. Lambert,'^ holds that the 
Twelve Tables were a collection made privately, 
probably by Sextus Aelius Paetus, in the early part 
of the second century b.c. But these theories 
produce more and greater difficulties than they 
claim to solve.^ 

" For the embassy and Hermodorus, see above. Cf. also 
Gaius, Dig., XLVII, 22, 4; X, 1, 13; Cic. de Leg., II, 23, 59; 
25, 64. Dion. Hal., X, 57; E. Pais, Ricerche .^ulla storia e -^ul 
diriito jiubblico di Roma, I, 1915, 147 ff. ; L. Mitteis, Romisckes 
Privafrecht bis an f die Zeit Diokletians, I, 14 S. 

^ Storia di Rovia, I, 1, 550 fF.; I, 2, 546 £F.; 631 £F.; II 
(2nd ed. 1915), 217 fif. ; Ricerche, I, n. i-vii. 

<^ Nouv. Rev. Hist, de droit fran^ais et etranger, XXVI, 1902, 
147 ff.; Rev. gen. de droit, XXVI, 1902, n. 5 and 6, 381 ff . ; 
480 ff.; XXVII, 1903, 15 fiF. ; L'histoire traditionnelle des XII 
Tables in Melanges Ch. Appleton, I, 1903, 126 ff.; 501 ff.; 
La fonction du droit civil coTYipare, I, 1903, 398 fiF. Cf. Baviera, 
St. Perozzi, Iff.; P. Francisci, Storia del diritto Romano, I, 
1926, 193 fiF. 

'^ P. Girard, Nouv. Rev., XXVI, 381 fiF. = Melanges, I, 
1-64; Textes de droit Rrnnain, 6th ed. 1937, 3^; 0. Lenel, 
Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung f. Rechtsgeschichte, Rom. Abt., 
XXVI, 498 fiF. Erman, op. cit., XXIII, 450-457; A. H. J. 
Greenidge, English Hist. Rev., XX, 1905, 1 fiF. Appleton, 
Atti d. Congresso intern, di Scienze stor., IX, 23 ff. ; Kalb, 
Jahresber. f. Altert., CIX, 21 fF.; CXXXIV, 17 fF. ; Korne- 
mann, Histor. Vierteljahresschrift, IX, 370 ff. ; Collard, De 

xxix 



INTRODUCTION 

Tlie original tablets and copies of them were 
probably destroyed, as tradition says, when the Gauls 
burnt Rome in 390, though Livy, \'I, 1 (see p. 50G) 
implies that such destruction was not complete ; 
and even if copies or other substitutes were published 
afterwards, there was at the end of the Republic 
no standard edition of the code, but a number of 
unofficial texts in which, as the remains show, the 
language (while still retaining archaic forms, and a 
simple, curt, and almost childish kind of phrases which 
are mostly terse commands or prohibitions in prose, 
though some seek metric rhythms in them) was 
assimilated more and more to classical Latin, and was 
otherwise marred by interpolations and alterations. 
An edition of the Tables, with interpretation and 
commentary, Mas included by Sextus Aelius Paetus 
(consul in 198) in his Triperiita; and it may be that 
from this (' modernised ' ?) recension most later 
writers drew their quotations. 

Such fragments as survive to-day are found in 
writers of the last century of the Republic and in 
writers of the imperial period, and appear in four 
kinds : (i) Fragments which have the appearance of 
containing the original words, or nearly so, of a law, 
* modernised,' however, in spelling, and to some 
extent in word-forms. Such fragments are in this 
book given in separately indented groups of large 
type, (ii) Fragments which are fused with the 
sentences of the quoter, but otherwise show little 
distortion, (iii) Fragments which are not only fused 

Vauthenticile de la hi des XII Tables. For the whole problem, 
cf. also P. Bonfante, Hist, du droit Rornain {Storia del diritto 
romano), tradiiite sur la 3e. ed., J. Carrere, F. Fournier, 1928, 
II, 77 ff. C. L. Kooiinan, Fragm. Juris. Quir., 1 fif. 



INTRODUCTION 

with the context of the quoter, but are also much 
distorted, though they certainly give, in the form 
of a paraphrase, the purport of a law. These kinds 
(ii, iii) I have given in large type, but not otherwise 
separated from the context of the quoter. Such large 
type does not claim to give actual words of laws, 
though in fact to some extent it does so. (iv) Pas- 
sages which give only an interpretation (or an opinion 
based on an interpretation) or the title or convenient 
designation of a law. Such passages I have, accord- 
ing to the practice of editors of the Tables, for the 
most part merely cited among the supplementary 
sources for any enactment when the enactment is 
better revealed by another source. But one or two 
such passages have been given in full, but in small 
type if they are merely of interpretative character. 

The sources for the fragments show that the code 
was known under two titles — Duodecim Tabulae and 
Lex Duodecim Tabularum. Here the word Lex means 
' act of Parliament '—in this case the act of the 
Roman Assembly when it passed the Tables as a 
whole code of ' leges ' or laws. In this book, when 
the word Lex (the La7v) appears in the sense of comitial 
ratification, I give it a capital letter as here. But 
when the source of any fragment refers to a particular 
enactment or law of the Tables, I call it simply lex 
(a law). 

Only in a very few cases do w^e know or can we 
surmise the number of the tablet on which any law 
appeared; this allows us to deduce the relevant 
tablet of a few other laws — but of very few. With 
these exceptions the arrangement of the fragments 
so as to produce remnants of all the twelve tables is 
used among scholars only for convenience. This 

xxxi 



INTRODUCTION 

metliod goes back to H. Dirkscn, and I have not 
altered it except in a few unimportant places, the 
text in Bruns' Fonies, 7th edition, beinc; taken as the 
standard. In this edition and translation the number 
of each enactment in each Table usually appears 
not only above each item but also on the left of the 
first word of each enactment as quoted or otherwise 
reproduced by the source. 

Modern Editions of the Twelve Tables 

H. E. Dirks en. Uebersicht der biskerigen Versuche 
zur Kritiku. Herstelhing d. Textes d. Zwolf-Tafel- 
Fragmente. Leipzig. 1824. In this will be 
found recorded all previous Mork on the Twelve 
Tables.^ 

R. Schoell. Legis Duodecim Tabidarum Reliquiae. 
Leipzig. Teubner. 1866. 

J. Wordsworth. Fragments and Speeime?is of Early 
Latin. Oxford. 1874. pp. 254 ff., 502 ff. 

M. Voigt. Die XII Tafeln. Geschichte u. System 
des Civil-ii. Criminal-Recktes, wie-Prosesses, der 
XII Tafeln nebst deren Fragmenten. Leipzig. 
1883. Two volumes. Text in vol. I, pp. 693- 
737. This work is not accepted as sound. 

F. Goodwin. The Twelve Tables. London. Stevens. 
1886. 

F. D. Allen. Remnants of Early Latin. Boston. 
Ginn. 1884, pp. 84 ff. 

S. Riccobono, J. Baviera, and C. Ferrini. Fontes 
Juris Romani Antejustiniani. Florence. Bar- 
bera. 1909. pp. 21-63. 

" Reconstruction of the Twelve Tables goes back to the 
work of A. du Rivail, early in the sixteenth century. 

xxxii 



INTRODUCTION 

C. G. Bruns. Fontes Juris Romani Antiqui. 7th ed. 

O. Gradenwitz. Tubingen. 1909. 
J. Muirhead. Historical hitrodnction to the Private 

Law of Rome. rev. Goudy. 3rd ed. Grant. 

1916. Appendix, pp. 420 fF. 
S. P. Scott. The Civil Law, including the Twelve 

Tables, etc. Translated. Edited. Cincinnati. 

Central Trust Company. Vol. I, pp. bl-11. 
P. F. Girard. Textes de droit Romain. 5th ed. 

1923. 6th ed. by F. Senn. Paris. 1937. 

There are other texts, commentaries and trans- 
lations, but they are mostly not important. Nikol- 
sky's System and Text of the Law of the Twelve Tables, 
1897. is in Russian. Cf. Zeitschrift, d. Sav.-Stift. f 
Rechtsgesch., XIX, 374 ff. 

For commentaries on the Twelve Tables, see especi- 
ally Wordsworth op. cit., pp. 502 ff. ; H. F. Jolo^v^cz, 
Historical Introduction to the Study of Roman Law, 
pp. 106-191. There is a useful article Tabulae 
Duodecim by Berger in Pauly-Wissowa, Realoicyclo- 
pddie. 

For abbreviations, see above, p. xxvi, and Remains 
of Old Latin, Vol. I, p. xxxiii. 

E. H. Warmixgton 

Birkbeck College, 

University of London, 

Fetter Lane, London, E.C.4:. 
21st October, 1938. 



xxxni 



LUCILIUS 



VOL. III. 



LUCILIUS 



LIBER I 

Sat. I. 

1 

Varro, L.L., V, 17 : Lucilius suorum unius et viginti 
librorum initium fecit hoc — 

Aetheris et terrae genitabile quaerere tempus. 

2 
Persius, Sat., I, 1 : — 

O curas hominum ! O quantum est in rebus inane ! 

Schol., ad loc. . . . Hunc versum de Lucili primo transtulit. 

S-4 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 125, 19 K : ' Canes.' Lucilius I — 

<r littera . . .) 
inritata canes quam homo quam planius dicit. 

Cp. Nonius, 31, 25; Donatus ad Tor., Adelph., II, 4, 18 
(. . . Lucilius de littera r). 

Varro : Lucilius S Lucretius cdd. 

^ quaerere, tempus M 

Schol. : principio Reitzenstein qui lib. X trib. 

3 r littera addidi coll. Donat., I.e. 

" Cichorius, Uniersuchungen zu Lucilius, 219-220. W. 
Baehrens, H., LIV, 81 ff., is not convincing. Marx, proleg., 
XXXV if. argues for 126 B.C. 



LUCILIUS 



BOOK I 

Composed (probably after the death of L. Cornelius Lentulus 
Lupus) in 123 " B.C., and after Books XXVI-XXX. 
I distinguish three satires. 

Sat. I. Introduction. Liicilius disclaims phj/sical philo- 
sophy. 

1 

Varro : Lucilius composed the following as the beginning 
of his twenty-one books — * 

To seek the time which generated sky and earth. 

.2 
He approaches satire : 
Persius : — 

Oh, the cares of mankind! Oh, how much 
emptiness there is in the world ! '^ 

Schol. on this passage : . . . This line Persius transferred 
from the first book of Lucilius. 

3-4 

The snarl of satire : 

Charisius : ' Canes.' Lucilius in (book) I — 
the letter r, which a dog, when it is teased, utters 
more plainly than a man. 

* That is, of the separate set of twenty-one books ; on this, 
see Introduction, pp. 21 ff. 

" Marx attributes this to a god's speech in the trial of Lupus, 
for which see below. Mueller and Lachmann give the wrong 
line of Persius here. Cf. Marx, ad 9. 

3 
b2 



LUCILIUS 

Sal. II. Concilium Deorum (Lactantins, Div. Insl., IV, 3, 12 
L. in deorum concilio). 

Servius ad Aen., X, 104 : , . . Totus hie locus de primo 
Lucilii translatus est, ubi introducuntur dii habere concilium, 
et agere primo de interitu Lupi cuiusdam ducis {vel ' iudicis ') 
in re publica, postea sententias diccre. 



Servius, ad Aen., IX, 227 : . . . Est Lucilii versus uno 
tantum sermone mutato ; nam ille ait — 

Consilium summis hominum de rebus habebant. 

6-7 

Schol. Veron., ad Aen., XII, 680 : ' Amplius,' id est diutius, 
ulterius. Lucil. — • 

quo populum atque urbem pacto servare potisset 
amplius Romanam. 

Cp. lul. Rom., ap. Charis., G.L., I, 195, 6 K. 

8 

Nonius, 159, 27 : ' Protollere ' est differre. Lucilius 
Satyrarum lib. I — 

si non amplius, at lustrum hoc protolleret unum. 

9 

Nonius, 497, 4 : Accusati\'Tis positus pro ablativo ... — 

munus tamen fungi et muros servare potissint. 

^ pactos Schol. pactum p.a.u. potissit Charis. 
^ potissint Mr. potissent Mercicr possint cdd. 

" Title of a satire, or even of the whole book ; it may be the 
title given by Lucilius himself. 

** On Lu])us see ]\larx, prolcg. XXXV ff. ; Cichor., 77 ff . 
219 ff.; Baehrens, H., LIV, 81 If. 



BOOK I 

Sat. II. A Council or Parliament of the God^.^ A meeting 
of deities who discuss the luxury of Rome and try the chief sinner — 
Lucius Cornelius Lentulus Lupus,^ prvnceps senatus in 131 B.C. 

Servius on Virgil, Aen. X, 104 ff. : The whole of this passage 
is transferred from the first book of Lucilius, where gods are 
brought in as holding a council, and dealing first with the 
death of one Lupus, a leading man {or judge) in the state, and 
afterwards giving their decisions. 



Servius, on a line of Virgil: It is a line of Lucilius with only- 
one word changed ; for he says — 

They were holding parliament on the highest 
affairs of men. 

6-7 

Lucilius gives the reason for the assembly : 

A scholiast on Virgil : ' Amplius,' that is longer, further. 
Lucilius — 

by what means ^ he could further save the Roman 
city and people. 

8 

A way to put off the ruin of Rome : 

Nonius : ' Protollere ' means to put off. Lucilius in the 
first book of the Satires — 

if not longer, yet at least to see if he might put 
this off for one period.*^ 

9 

Rome need not he punished : 

Nonius : The accusative put instead of the ablative ... — 
still they could perform their duty and keep safe 
the walls. 

<" Or retaining pactos — ' how he could . . . who had made a 
pledge.' 

^ i.e. five years. 

5 



LUCILIUS 
10 



Nonius, 345, 1 : ' Meret,' humillimum et sordidissimum 
quaestum capit. . . . Lucilius lib. I — 

" et mercedimerae legiones." 

cp. Porphyr., ad Hor,, EpisL, I, 3, 6. 

11 

Nonius, 161, 11: ' Popinones ' vel hi quos nos dicinius 
tabernarios, a popinis, vel luxuriosi qui se popinis de- 
dunt. ... — 

" infamem . . . turpemque odisse popinam." 

12 

Nonius, 536, 15 : ' Tunica ' est vestimentum sine 
manicis ... — 

" Praetextae ac tunicae Lydorum opus sordidulum 
omne," 

13 

Nonius, 540, 26 : ' Amphitapoe ' vestes dicuntur utrimque 
habentes villos. Lucilius Satyrarum lib. I — 

** psilae atque amphitapi villis ingentibus molles. 

op. Isid., Orig., XIX, 26, 5. 

^° mercedimerae Nettleship merccde meras cdd. Porphyr. 
mercede meret religiones cdd. Non. (relegiones Lu. 1) 

1^ infamera 1 ed. 1476 famam inhonestam autem M in- 
fumam egestatem L alii alia infamam honestam cdd. 
fortasse explanatio ' inlionestam,^ postea ipsa corrupta, secundum 
versus vocabulum (quaestum B vestem coni. Linds.) dctruMt ; 
fortasse scripsit poeta famara inhonestatam ; cp. Ov., Trist., 
IV, S, 19. 



BOOK I 
10 

The evil ways of Rome of Lupus' time : 

Nonius : ' Meret,' gets a very lowly and sordid profit . . . 
Lucilius in bk. I has ' mercedimerae ' — 

" and wage-earning brigades." '^ 

11 

The good old times : 

Nonius : ' Popinones ' are those whom we now call bar- 
loungers, from ' popinae,' or they are extravagant people who 
devote themselves to vittling-houses ... — 

" and to hate the infamous and shameful vittling- 
house. 

12 

But now costly foreign wares bring luxury : 

Nonius : ' Tunica ' is a garment without sleeves ... — 

" Bordered cloaks and underdress, all dirty mean 
workmanship of Lydiaiis," ^ 



13 

Nonius : ' Amphitapoe ' is the name given to coverings 
having nap-tufts on both sides ... — 

" single-napped and soft double-napped coverlets 
with huge tufts." 

<* Porphyrio interprets the words of the fragment as apply- 
ing, without contempt, to the army. I believe they are 
scornful words. Might they apply to clients ? 

* Result of the bequeathing by Attains III of his kingdom 
to Rome, 133 B.C.— cf. Cichor., 228-9. 

12 sordidulum Dousa (I.) Sardibus Bergk sordidum 

cdd. (sordidam Lu. 1) 



LUCILIUS 
14 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 118, 25 K : Nomina quaedam sunt 

, quae Plinius . . . patiendi vocat, ut aquale; 

nam Lucilius libro I saturarum — 

" ' arutaenae'qiie " inquit " aquales." 

15-6 
Macrobius, Sat., VI, 4, 18 : Inseniit (Vergilius) operi suo 
et Graeca verba, sed non primus hoc ausus. . . . Lucilius 
in primo — 

" Porro ' clinopodas ' ' lychnos'que ut diximus 

semnos 
anti * pedes lecti ' atque ' lucernas.' " 

17 

Nonius, 521, 27 : ' Mira ' et ' miracula ' veteres pro mon- 
stris vel horrendis ponebant ... — 

" miracla f ciet t elephant as. 

18 
Nonius, 158, 6 : ' Pausa ' est quies alicuius rei . . . — 
Haec ubi dicta dedit, pausam <(dedit)ore loquendi. 
cp. Verg., Jew., I, 81; VI, 76. 

19 

Pseudo-Asconius, ad Cic, de Div., 43 : Incipiebant veteres, 
ut Vergilius ostendit, aut ab invocatione deorum, . . . aut 
reprehensione superioris temporis, ut ait Lucilius — 

** Vellem cumprimis, fieri si forte potisset, . . . 

1^ anti = dvTL Mr. ante cdd. 

1' miracla ciet tylyphantas M {contra inctrum) cient 
elephanteis Mr. ciet elefantas [vel telefantas Lu. G. Par. 

7666 Lugd. Bamh.) cdd. ciet et e. Lu. 1 ciet elefantes Harl. Par. 
7667, Escorial. cient lun. Jortaisse rairacnla cete | phalaenas 

18 dedit add. Linds. <fecit>pausam ore Terzaghi 

1^ potissit Pistor petisset cd princ. trib. lib. I S 

i»-22 coiiiunx. et trib. lib. I S 
8 



BOOK I 
U 

Romans use Greek words instead of the good old Latin : 

Charisius : There are certain nouns . . . which Pliny calls 
of the passive function, as ' aquale ' ; for example Lucilius in 
the first book of the Satires — 

" and the term ' draw-liquids ' is used " said he, 
" for water-basins." 

15-6 

Macrobius : Virgil inserted into his work even Greek words, 
but he was not the first to be so bold as to do this. . . . Lucilius 
in the first book — 

" And further, the way we said ' clinipods ' and 
' lustres ' magnifically, instead of ' bed-feet ' and 
* lamps.' "... 

17 

extraordinary sights : 

Nonius : ' Mira ' and ' miracula ' (wonders) are terms which 
the old writers used to put for monsters or horrible things ... — 

" marvels . . . elephants." 

18 

E7id of a god\s speech : 

Nonius : ' Pausa ' means rest from something ... — 

When he had said these words, he made a pause in 
his speaking. 

19 

Some god speaJcs of a former council : 

Pseudo-Asconius : . . . The old writers, as Virgil shows, 
used to begin either with calling upon the gods, ... or with 
a reproach of former times, as Lucilius has it — 

" Especially could I wish, if by chance it were 
possible, . . ." 

9 



LUCILIUS 

20-2 
lul. Rufinianus, de Figuris Senientiarum ap. R.L., 46, 1 H : 
' Epanalepsis,' repetitio sententiae . . . ; sic apud Lucilium — 

" Vellem concilio vestrum, quod clicitis olim, 
caelicolae, hie habitum, vellem adfuissemiis priore 
concilio. 

23 

Servius, ad Aen., IV, 458 : ' Coniugis antiqui,' aut prioris 
aut cari. Serv. aucf. : Lucilius — 

" Concilio antiquo sapiens vir solus fuisti." 

24-7 
Lactantius, Divin. Instil., IV, 3, 12 : Et luppiter a pre- 
cantibus pater vocatur et Saturnus et lanus et Liber et ceteri 
deinceps, quod Lucilius in deorum concilio inridet — 

ut 
nemo sit nostrum quin aut pater optimus divum, 
aut Neptunus pater, Liber Saturnus pater, Mars 
lanus Quirinus pater siet ac dicatur ad unum." 

28-9 
Servius auctus, ad Aen., Ill, 119 : Quidam pulcher Apollo 
epitheton datum Apollini reprehendunt : pulchros enim a 
veteribus exsoletos dictos; nam et apud Lucilium Apollo 
pulcher dici non vult. 

Nonius, 258, 38 : ' Contendere ' significat comparare ... — 
. . . " ut contendere possem 
Thestiados Ledae atque Ixionies alochoeo." 

20 vellem D (I.) velcdd. 

21 hie habitum vellem suppl. M alii alia 
23 trib. lib. I Van Heusde 

28 'l^toviTjs aXoxoLo Mercier ixiones alcholochco Lu. 
cximone salcholocheo Gen., Bern. 83. 

** See pp. 4-5. 

'' There may be a hit at Appius Claudius Pulcher, consul in 
130 B.C. 

ID 



BOOK I 

20-2 

Julius Rufinianus : ' Epanalepsis,' a repetition of a spoken 
thought . . . ; thus in Lucilius — 

" I could wish that at that parliament of your- 
selves, which ye say, O denizens of heaven, was 
once held here, — that we had been present at that 
former parliament. 

23 

Servius, on ' coniugis antiqui ' in Virgil : Either ' former ' 
or ' dear consort.' The augmenter adds : Lucilius — 

" At that former parliament you were the only 
wise man." 

24-7 

Apollo speaks ? : 

Lactantius : People at prayer call not only on Jupiter but 
also Saturn Janus Liber, and all the others in turn, as ' father ' ; 
Lucilius laughs at this in the " Council of the Gods " "■ — 

" SO that there is not one of us who is not called 

* father ' ; ' father ' the best of the gods is called ; 
Neptune also is * father,' Liber and Saturn are 

* father,' Mars, Janus, Quirinus are * father ' ; one and 
all are called so." 

28-9 
Servius (supplemented) on a passage in Virgil : Some find 
fault with ' beautiful ' Apollo as an epithet given to Apollo, 
saying that ' beautiful ' was a term applied by old writers to 
debauched young men ; for example even in Lucihus Apollo 
does not wish to be called ' beautiful ' {or ' j^retty ').^ 

Apollo speaks : 

Nonius : ' Contendere ' means to compare ... — 

" that I might be able to compare my beauty 
with that of Leda, Thestius' daughter, and with 
that of Ixion's wife." ^ 

•= Dia. Jupiter had been a lover of both her and Leda. 

II 



LUCILIUS 

30-2 

lulius Rufinianus, de Fig. Sent., 30 {R.L., 45, 27 H) : Enthy- 
mema fit cum pcriodos orationis ex contrariis sententiis 
astringitur. Apud Luciliura — 

" Si me nescire hoc nescis quod qiiaerere dico, 
quare divinas quicquam ? an tu quaerere debes 
ipse ? et si scis q. b. e. scire hoc d. t." 

33 

Nonius, 5, 6 : ' Cinaedi ' dicti sunt apud veteres saltatores 
vel pantomimi. ... — 

**...* stulte saltatum te inter venisse cinaedos.' 

34 

Donatus, ad Ter., Andr., V, 4, 38 : ' Scirpus ' palustris res 
est levissima. Lucilius in primo — 

". . . nodum in scirpo, in sano facere ulcus." 

35 

Lactantius, Divin. Itistif., V, 15, 3 : Cuius in disserendo 
quae vis fuerit, quae eloquentia, quod acumen, qui nescit 
ipsum, ex praedicatione Ciceronis intelleget, aut Lucilii, apud 
quem disserens Neptunus de re difficilliraa ostendit non posse 
id explicari — 

non Carneaden si ipsum Orcus remittal." 

^1 an tu M aut cdd. quaerere Gesner quaro 

cdd. aut quare sapis ipse ? Leo 

^2 quod bellum est scire ; hoc dare tempta M quod bonum 
erit scire hoc dare tute L quare bonus es ? scire hoc dabis ? 
tempta Leo, G.G.A., 1906, (i) 843 trib. lib. I Becker 

'* <qui vultis> nodum Terzaghi 

<• This is conjectural; in the Latin text of Rufinianus, of 
five of the words the initial letter only is given. 

* proverbial. A hit at G. Gracchus against whom Scipio 
used the same proverb (Macrob., S., Ill, 14, 16). 

12 



BOOK I 

30-2 

A god in perplexity questions Apollo ? : 

Julius Rufinianus : An ' enthymema ' comes about when a 
period of speech is bound together from contrary thoughts. 
In a passage of Lucilius — 

If YOU do not know that I do not know that 
which, I tell you, I am asking, why do you utter any 
prophecy ? Ought you yourself to be asking ? And 
if you know what it is good to know, then try to 
tell it! "« 

33 
A god alludes to Apollo's {or Lupus'' ?) past ? : 

Nonius : ' Cinaedi ' is a term which was used by the ancients 
for dancers or ballerini ... — 

"... that you like a fool went among the low 
debauchees to dance. '^ 

34 

In defence : 

Donatus : ' Scirpus ' (bulrush) of the marshes is something 
very smooth. Lucilius in the first book — 

. . . "to make a knot in a bulrush, a sore on a 
sound body." '^ 

35 

Neptune speaks : 

Lactantius : The force, eloquence, and acuteness of Car- 
neades in discussion will l)ecome clearer, to one who does not 
know the man's works themselves, from the compliments of 
Cicero or of Lucilius, in whom Xeptune discussing about a 
difficult matter represents that it cannot be unravelled — 

" not if the Lower World should send back Car- 
neades himself."'^ 

<= Housman, C.Q., I, 56. 

^ Carneades (who died in 129) could argue both sides of a 
question, as he did in Rome in 155-4 B.C. 

13 



LUCILIUS 

36 

Isidorus, de differ, verb., I, 589 : Lucilius haec quasi dis- 
tinguens ait — 

" Quae fades, qui vultus viro? 

37 

Nonius 427, 1 : ' Vultus ' et ' facies ' . . . — 

" Vultus item ut facies, mors, icterus morbus, 
venenum." 

38 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 98 3 K : ' Vultur ' dixit Vergilius 
iQ VI, sed et ' \ ulturius ' Lucilius in I. 

39-41 

Donatus, ad Ter., Eun., IV, 5, 8 : ' lam dudum, aetatem,' 
pro longinquo tempore. Lucilius — et Nonius, 174, 26 : 
' Scelerosi ' pro scelerati ... — 

" ut multos mensesque diesque, 
non tamen aetatem, tempestatem banc scelerosi 
mirentur." 

42-5 

lulius Rufinianus, de Fig. Sent. 26. E.L., 45, 6 H : 
'Epagoge.' Fit haec ex rerum similium collatione vel 



36 trib. lib. I Mr. 

3^ icterus S acer L teter Passerat cetera M 
ceter Stowasser citera Harl. Par. 7667 Escorial. citer rell. 
3^"' coniunx. M 
3*"*^ ut . . . aetatem Donat. non . . . mirentur Non. 

14 



BOOK I 

36 

Description of the accused : 

Isidore, on ''fades ' and ' vultus ' ; It is one may say for the 
sake of distinction that Lucilius says the following — 

" What sort 's the man's face, and what his coun- 
tenance ? " 

37 

Nonius : ' Countenance ' and ' face ' " . . . — 

** His countenance is like his face — it's death, 
jaundice-disease, poison." 

38 

Charisius, in G.L., I, 98, 3K: 'Vultur' is the form used 
by Virgil in (book) VI and we have even 'Vulturius' for 
' Vulture ' in Lucilius, (book) I. 

39-41 

The trouble about Lupus ? 

Donatus : ' Some time now ; an age ago ' instead of ' for 
a long time.' Lucilius . . . combined with Nonius : ' Scele- 
rosi ' for ' scelerati ' . . . — 

" so that for many days and months, but still not 
for a life-time, may the villains marvel at this 
storm." ^ 

42-5 

Julius Rufinianus : ' Epagoge.' This comes about by con- 
joining two similar things or themes, keeping however a 



" Nonius says that ' vultus ' is the expression of the mind's 
condition as seen in the ' facies,' the mere face. 

^ Cf. P. Moeller, Dtos conciliantes qua ratione Lucilius in 
libro primo aliique finxerint, 33. 

15 



LUCILIUS 

argumcntorum, salva tamen similitudine. Rerum. 
Argumentorum autem, ut Lucilius — 

" Nam si tu fluctus undasque e gurgite salso 
toUere decreris, venti prius Emathii vim, 
ventum, inquam, tollas t. c. q. i. 
1." 



46 
Varro, de L.L., VIT, 47 : Apud Lucilium ... — 
Occidunt, Lupe, saperdae te et iura siliiri ! 
. . . piscium nomina sunt, eorumque in Graecia origo. 

Sat. III. 

The following fragments from the first book would seem to 
be remnants of a separate satire on contemporary life, 
suggested perhaps by the satire which described the fate of 



47 

Diomedes, ap. G.L., I, 486, UK: Alii dictam putant a 
lege satura, quae uno rogatu multa simul conprehendat, quod 
scilicet et satura carmine multa poemata conprehenduntur ; 
cuius saturae legis Lucilius meminit in primo — 

per saturam aedilem factum qui legibus solvat. 

^^ Emathii vim L haematium cdd. 

*^"^ tum cuncta quieta iacebunt | litora H (ilii alia trib. 

lib. I Becker 

*^ Lupe saperdae te T lupes aper de te cdd, 

" Housman, C.Q.y I, 148. The Latin gives only the initial 
letter of each of the last five words. Emathia was a part of 
Macedonia. 

* I take this as a forecast, by a god, of Lupus' death and 
suggest two puns : — (a) on Lupus, lupus, a greedy kind of 

i6 



BOOK I 

likeness between them. Of things . . . And of themes, for 
example Lucilius — 

" For if thou (, Jupiter,) shouldst decide to abolish 
the billows and the waves from the swirling salt sea, 
abolish thou first the blast of the Emathian wind, — 
the wind, I say — then will all the shores lie still." " 

46 

On the fate of Lupus : 

Varro : In a passage of Lucilius ... — 

" O Bass, juices of the salt herring and the sheat- 
fish are the death of you ! " ^ 
. . . These are names of fish and their origin is in Greece. 

Sat. III. 

Lupus. I put these fragments after the concilium deorum 
because such an order is suggested by the order of two citations 
in Nonius, namely of lines 8 and 50-1, 

47 

Diomedes : Others think that the term (satura) is derived 
from a tacked law, which includes many things at once in one 
bill, for to be sure, in a piece of satiric song also, many poems 
at once are included. Of this tacked law Lucilius makes 
mention in his first book — 

who may absolve from the laws an aedile elected 
by tacked procedure.*^ 

fish (a bass?) in contrast with the herring and the sheat- 
fish; (b) on ins, iura, 'sauce' or 'soup' and ius, iura, 
' justice ' (cp. Cic, Verr., II, 1, 46, 121) which the smaller fry 
in the end exercise on the giant. 

'^ The words of this line can be connected in various ways, 
and we do not know what Lucilius meant. For various views 
see Cichor, 234-6; Leo, //., XXIV, 69, n. 3; Ullman, CP. 
VIII, 178 ff.; Kappelmacher, in Pauly-Wissowa, s.v. Lucilius 
(4), 1035; Terzaghi, ed. Luc. Sat., p. 3. 

I? 
VOL. III. C 



LUCILIUS 
48-9 

Nonius, 500, 18 : Ablativus pro genetivo ... — 
Porro quacumque et cuicumque, ut diximus ante 
obstiterit primo, f hoc minuendi f refert res. 

50-1 

Nonius, 159, 29 : ' Priva ' significat singula. Lucilius 
satyrarum lib. I et Gellius, X, 20, 4 : Veteres priva dixerunt 
quae nos singula dicimus; quo verbo Lucilius in primo 
Satirarum libro usus est — 

" ad cenam adducam, et primum hisce abdomina 

tunni 
advenientibus priva dabo cephalaeaque acarnae." 
Cp. Non., 35, 20. 

52 
Nonius, 117, 17 : *Gangraena' est cancer ... — 
serpere uti gangraena mala atque herpestica posset. 

LIBER II 

This book contained, it seems, one satire only, a parody of 

«>j«fcr the trial of the jurist Quintus Mucius Scaevola, accused in 119 

or during the first half of 118 B.C. by Titus Albucius on a 

charge of extortion in Asia. (Cichorius, 237 £E. Marx, proleg., 

53 

Schol. Veron., ad Ae7i., II, 81 : Lucilius in II — 

Fandam atque auditam iterabimus famam. 

'^ quacumque et W quacumque it M queicumque 

Mr. quaecumque (crW.) est L et quicuraque Linds. 

*^ minuendae intentus refert re Mr. 

^°~^ ad . . . dabo Non. 159 abdomina . . . acarnae Gell. 

^2 mala D (F.) malo cdd. malum Mr. adquem 

Lu. atque rell. 

^^ famam add. Keil 
i8 



BOOK II 

48-9 
Nonius : Ablative instead of genitive "... — 
Further, wherever and in whosesoever's way he 
stands first as we said before, ... he tells the news. 

50-1 

Nonius : ' Priva ' means individual. Lucilius in bk. I 
of the Satires — combined loith Gellius : The old writers used 
the term ' priva ' for things which we call ' singula ' (single, 
one to each) ; it is a word which Lucilius used in the first book 
of the Satires — 

"I'll bring them to dinner, and when they reach 
their places, I'll begin by giving them tunny's 
paunch, one each, and some heads of sea-perch." 

52 
Nonius : ' Gangraena ' is a canker * . . . — 
SO that the horrible creeping gangrene could come 
crawling. 

BOOK II 

XLII &.). I tentatively distinguish the speakers thus: 
Albucius, against Scaevola (A), and against witnesses {A.w.); 
Scaevola, invective (S), and defence {S.d.). 

53 

Lucilius anyiounces : 

Scholiast on Virgil : Lucilius in the second book — 
We will tell you again a tale that may be told — a 
tale already often heard. 

" the quotation is corrupt at the end, so that we cannot 
tell what Nonius found or took as ablative for genitive. 
^ Not cancer, but creeping gangrene. 

19 
c2 



LUCILIUS 

54-5 

Nonius, 291, 34 : ' Elidcre ' etiam oxcludere signifioat. , . . 
Lucilius 8atyrarum lib. 11 — 

** iniuriatum hunc in fauces invasse animamque 
elisisse illi ' 

56 
Nonius, 37, 9 : ' Monograrami ' dicti sunt homines macie 
pertenues ac decolores : tractum a pictura, quae prius quam 
coloribus corporatur umbra fingitur ... — 

" vix vivo homini ac monogrammo.* 

57 
Nonius, 129, 27 : ' Inpuno ' . . . inpudens ... — 
" Homo inpuratus et inpuno est rapinator. 

cp. Nonius, 167, 19. 

58-9 
Priscianus, ap. O.L., II, 483, 24 K : ' Oceido ' occasus 
o hvvas . . . — 

" quae horis sublata duabus 
omnia sunt sole occaso noctuque." 

60 
Nonius, 539, 17 : ' Rica ' est quod nos sudarium dicimus 

** chirodyti aurati, ricae, toracia, mitrae. 

^* inpuratum Muret 

^^ elisisse vel elisse aid. 

^' rapister Non. 129 homo inpudicus et impune est 
rapinator Non. 167 [s.v. rwpinatores) estque rapister Mr. 
estne M et est impune rapister Leo 

^^ occaso noctuque o — W ductoque Prise. obduc- 
toque tenebris D(I.) abductoque coni. M ductu huius 
manuque coni. Leo 

•5" chirodyti Mr. chirodoti Bouterwek hrodyty, 

hrodeti cdd. ricae Carrio thoracia Roth cice et 

oracia Lu. Harl. al. cae et oracia Q. 



BOOK II 

54r-5 

Accusations made by Albucius ; assault and battery : 

Nonius : ' Elidere ' (knock out, crush out) means even to 
exclude. . . . Lucilius in the second book of the Satires — 

(A) " that this wrong-doer made for his gullet, 
winded him, and knocked him out " 

56 
Nonius : ' jMonogrammi ' is a term applied to men who are 
very thin with leanness and have no colour; and it is derived 
from a painting wliich is sketched in outline before it is given 
body by means of colours ... — 

(A) " a mere outhne ^ of a man, hardly alive." 

57 
Scaevola is a robber : 

Nonius : ' Inpuno ' . . . impudent '^ . . . — 
(A) " He's a foul v/retch and a foot-pad, going 
scot-free too." 

58-9 
His larceny or burglary, and other misdeeds : 

Priscianus : ' Occido,' aorist-perfect participle masculine 
'occasus,' in Greek 6 hvvas ... — 

(A) " all of which were made away with within two 
hours after sun set and by night." 

60 
Nonius : ' Rica ' {really a veil for the head) is what we call 
a handkerchief ... — 

(A) " golden-buckled sleeved tunics, headveils, 
bodices, headbands." 

" Or, worse still, ' crushed out his life.' 

* Or ' a mere sketch.' 

'^ But Nonius and his source are wrong ; impuno (from an 
otherwise unknown word impunus) must mean without 
penalty. The reading rapinator (which should be rajnnator) 
is suspect. 



LUCILIUS 
61 

Nonius, 187, 17 : ' Bulga,' capacitas vol sinus sum laxitate 
" in bulgam penetrare pilosam. 

62 

Nonius, 65, 24 : ' Natrices ' dicuntur angues natantes ... — 

*' Si natibiis natricem inpressit crassam et capi- 
tatam," 

63 

Glossar. cod. Vat. ap. C. G.L., IV, 18 : ' Pedicum,' vicium 
mollitiae ... — 

** Pedicum. . . . iani excoquit omne. 



64-5 

Nonius, 10, 10 : ' Inlex ' et ' exlex ' est qui sine lege 
vivat . . . • — 

" Non dico * vincat licet ' ; et vagus exul et erret 
exlex. 

66 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 82, 5 K : luris consultus dici debet, 
non iure consultus ; licet . . . Lucilius II — 



" ut iure peritus. 



6^-5 Leo, G.O. A., 1906, (i), 844-5, exulet erret Non. vivat 
Mr. 
^^ iure 1 consultus Mr. 

•* clearly pedicum TratBiKov. Marx cannot be right; he 
lengthens the e but connects the word with pedis a louse. 
In the quotation there has dropped out the word or words 
causing the elision of um in pedicum. 

22 



BOOK II 
61 

Nonius: 'Bulga' (bag), a capacious receptacle or hollow 
having loose roominess ... — 

(A) " to penetrate into a hairy bag." 

62 

Nonius : ' Natrices ' is a term applied to water- snakes ... — 

(A) "If he has marked his buttocks with a 
writher, thick and headed, 

63 
Recovery from the effects of vice ? : 

A glossary has : ' Pedicum,' a vice of wantonness ... — 
(A) By then he burns out all lust for boys." ° 

64-5 

Let Scaevola be sentenced : 

Nonius : A man who is ' inlex ' and ' exlex ' is one who lives 
without the law ... — 

(A) " I do not say ' let him win his case '; no, 
let him be an exiled vas^abond and an outlawed 
wanderer.*^ 

66 

His skill : 

Charisius : We ought to say ' iuris consultus ' not ' iure 
consultus/ although it is true that . , . Lucilius in the second 
book has * iure peritus ' — 

(A) " like one skilled in law. 

^ right translation uncertain. 



23 



LUCILIUS 

67-9 

Nonius, 10, 27 : ' Lurchare ' est cum aviditate cibum 
sumere ... — 

"Nam quid nioetino subiectoque hide opus signo ? 
Ut lucaretur lardum et carnaria fartim 
conficeret ? 

70 



" \'ivite lurcones, comedones, vivite ventris ! " 
cp. Donat. ad Tcr., Phorm., V, 8, 95. 

71-2 

Nonius, 25, 14 : ' Catax ' dicitur quera nunc coxonem 
vocant ... — 

" Hostilius contra 
pestem permitiemque catax quam et Manlius 
nobis ..." 

cp. Nonius, 218, 32. 

73-4 

Nonius, 4, 18 : * Capulum ' dicitur quidquid aliam rem intra 
se capit ... — 

** Quom illi vidissent Hortensius Postumiusque 
ceteri item in capulo hunc non esse aliumque cubare, 

^' subiecto cdd. subrecto D (F.) 

68 fartim Flor. 3 Par. 7666 al. furtim T parum Lu. 1 
fartim parum G. f . porro M partum L 

'^ Nov., 10, 27 : ' Lurcones ' . . . lib. V Non. II Donnt. 

'^ Hostiliu' Gerlach hostibus Dousa (I.) hostibiraus 
Palmer (iS'^j/c.) hostili bus cc?(i. 

'2 Maniu' Mr. 

'^ quem illi cum cdd. quem cum lun. quom illic 
Mr. quom illico Linds. 

24 



BOOK II 

67-9 

Think of his mascot, and his gluttony : 

Nonius : ' Lurchare ' means to take food with greedi- 
ness ... — 

(A) " For what need had he of a phallic emblem ° 
thus affixed ? That he might stuff himself by guzzling 
up bacon-fat and stripping meat-hooks? " 

70 
a7id of the gluttony of his friends : 

Nonius : ' Lurcones ' are so called from ' lurchare ' . . . — 
(A) " Good living to you, you gluttons, you 
guzzlers, good living to you, you bellies ! 

71-2 

Questioning of Albwius' vntnesses ? : 

Nonius : By ' catax ' (limping) is meant he whom they now 
call ' coxo ' (hobbling) ... — 

(S.d.) " On the other hand, the wrack and ruin which 
Hostilius and limping ^ Manlius try to bring upon us," 

73-4 

The incident of the assault {in Asia) : 

Nonius : ' Capulum ' (coffin, tomb) is a term applied to 
anything which 'capit,' takes, another thing inside itself . . . — 

(S.d.) " When they, Hortensius and Postumius 
and the rest of them too, saw that in the coffin there 
lay not this man but another,*^ 

" i.e. a scare-goblm. cf. Marx, XLIII-XLV; Cichor., 
UntersucJi., 240-1. 

^ But catax may be another proper name here; cf. 
Cichorius, 249 ff. 

*■ The victim had perhaps carried out a sham funeral in 
order to obtain compensation — Cichor., 243. 

25 



LUCILIUS 

75 
Nonius, 261, 29 : ' Circumferre ' est proprie lustrare . . . — 
" Turn facta omnia, sum circumlatus." 

76 
Nonius, 335, 16 : ' Lustrare ' . . . — 

" lustratus, piatus." 



77 

Nonius, 268, 1 : ' Coicere,' furari, auferre ... — 
" Quid dicis ? cur est factum quod coicis istuc ? " 

78-9 
Nonius, 102, 7 : ' Excantare ' significat excludere ... — 

" quae ego nunc huic Aemilio prae- 
canto atque exigo et excanto." 

80-1 
Nonius, 102, 19 : ' Exculpere ' est cxtorquere ... — 

" Nunc Nomentani quae ex testibus ipse rogando 
exculpo, haec dicam." 

'^ facta vel facto c(kl. farto lun. farcto Mr. sunt 
circumlatus cdd. (sum Ber7i. 83) circumlata lun. 

" quod cdd. (quo Escorial.) quor coni. Mr. 

'* huic add. M praecanto cdd. atque precando Mr. 

^^ nunc Nomentani quae S nunc in nomen iam, quae M 
{qui et n. n. i., Quinte coni.) nunc nomen iam iam quae 
Leo nunc nomen iamque cdd. 

26 



BOOK II 

75 
Nonius : * Circumferre ' properly means to cleanse . . . 
{S.d.) " Then all was done aright, I was purified." 

76 
Nonius : ' Lustrare ' . . . — 
(S.d.) " cleansed, made pure." 

77 
The charges of thieving ? : 

Nonius {utterly mistaking the meaning of ' coicere ') : 
' Coicere,' to steal, take away ... — 

(S.d.) "WTiat say you? ^^^ly comes it that you 
make that charge ?" 

78-9 
Questioning of toitnesses by Albucius. 
He questions AemiliiLS, witness in favour of Scaevola : 

Nonius : ' Excantare ' (to charm out by song) means 
' excludere ' . . . — 

(A.w.) " which I now fore-chant to Aemilius here, 
which I force out and chant out. 

80-1 

Albucius questions the icitnesses of L. Atilius Xomentanus ? 
accused with Scaevola ? : 

Nonius : ' Exculpere ' means to twist out ... — 
{A. TV.) " And now you Avill hear from me all that I 
can gouge out of Nomentanus' witnesses by ques- 
tioning him myself." *' 

° Scaevola perhaps humorously alleges that he was purified 
of blood-guilt — Cichor, 242, 244. But cf. also Marx, pp. 
30-2. 

** Cichor., 244-6, Fiske, Luciliv^ and Horace, 327. 

27 



LUCILIUS 

82 

Donatus, ad Tcr., Phorm., I, 2, 73 : ' Qui ' utinam est, ut 
Lucilius in II — 

*' Qui te, Nomentane, malum di — " ad cetera 
pergit. 

83 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 7, 23 : ' Cohortem ' comites dicit 
Bruti, qui in consilio eius erant. Sic et Lucilius ait — 

ut praetoris cohors et Nostius dixit aruspex. 



84-6 

Cicero, de Oral., Ill, 43, 171 : Conlocationis est componere 
et struere verba sic ut neve asper eorum concursus neve hiulcus 
sit, sed quodam modo coagmentatus et levis. In quo lepide 
soceri mei persona lusit is qui elegantissime id facere potuit, 
Lucilius — 

" Quam lepide lexis conpostae ut tesserulae omnes 
arte pavimento atque emblemate vermiculato ! 

quae cum dixisset in Albucium inludens, ne a me quidem 
abstinuit — 

" Crassum habeo generum, ne rhetoricoterus tu seis. 

Cp. Cic, Or., 44, 149; Brul., 79, 274; Non., 188, 20; Plin., 
XXXVI, 185; Quintil., IX, 4, 113. 



^2 qui . . . di C 244-6 (di 7705f qui B) qui te mons mon- 
tane mali — turn ad e. q. s. Leo qui te montane malum ad 
cetera pergit Donai. 

83 trib. lib. XI B, lib. XIV M 

28 



BOOK II 
82 

Donatus : ' Qui ' means ' would that,' for example Lucilius 
in the second (book) — 

(A.w.) " Would that, Nomentanus, you the gods to 
hell " — and he went on to the rest of it. 

83 

{The following might belong to this trial) : 

Porphyrio : By ' cohors ' he means the companions of 
Brutus who belonged to his council. Thus Lucilius also says — 

as the praetor's train and Nostius the soothsayer 
said. 

84-6 

Scaevola in an ' altercation ' with Albucius. 

Scaevola mocks at Albucius'' oratory ivith its Greek terms : 

Cicero : It is the function of arrangement to put together 
and to build up one's words in such a way that their com- 
bination is neither rough nor gaping, but one might say glued 
together and smooth. In which connexion, in the character 
of my father-in-law, he who could do it most elegantly, 
namely Lucilius, made charming play — 

(S) " How charmingly are ses dits put together — 
artfully like all the little stone dice of mosaic in a 
paved floor or in an inlay of wriggly pattern ! 

and when he had spoken that, making play of Albucius, 
he did not keep his tongue off even me — 

(S) " Crassus " have I as son-in-law, lest you be 
too much Vorateur. 

" i.e. Lucius Licinius Crassus, bom in 140 B.C.; accused C. 
Garbo in 119. lexis = Ae^etj, ' words,' * phrases.' 

29 



LUCILIUS 

87-93 

Cicero, de Fin., I, 3, 8 : Res . . . bonas, verbis electis 
graviter ornateque dictas, quis non legat ? Nisi qui se plane 
Graecum dici velit, ut a Scaevola est praetore salutatus 
Athenis Albucius. Quern quidem locum cum multa venu- 
state et omni sale idem Lucilius, apud quern praeclare 
Scaevola — 

" Graecum te, Albuci, quam Romanum atque 

Sabinum 
municipem Ponli, Tritani, centurionum, 
praeclarorum honiinum ac primorum signiferumque, 
maluisti dici. Graece ergo praetor Athenis, 
id quod maluisti te, cum ad me accedis, salute : 

* chaere ' inquam ' Tite.' Lictores, turma omnis 

chorusque : 

* chaere Tite.' Hinc hostis mi Albucius, hinc 

inimicus ! 



LIBER III 

This book also, it seems, contained only one satire, in the 
form of a letter to a friend (Scipio, or Mummius ? — Lafaye, 
Eev. de Phil., XXXV, 22) and describing an outward journey 
which Lucilius took from Rome between 120 and 116 B.C., 
probably in order to visit some estates of his in Southern 
Italy and in Sicily. Cichorius, 251-261 argues that the book 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 5, 1 : Lucilio hac satura aemulatur 
Horatius iter suum a Roma Brundisiura usque describens, quod 
et ille in tertio libro fecit, primo a Roma Capuam usque, et 
inde fretum Siciliense. 

^2 cohorsque coni. Manutius 
3P 



BOOK III 

87-93 

Albucivs a hellenomaniac : joke played on him by Scaevola's 
coJiors at Athens — cause of Albucius' haired of him : 

Cicero : As for good themes, spoken with dignity and 
beauty with choice words, who would not read them ? Unless 
it be one who wants himself to be called downright Greek, 
just as Albucius was greeted at Athens by Scaevola the praetor. 
An anecdote indeed which, with much neatness and all wit 
our same Lucilius gives us ; in a passage of his Scaevola speaks 
thus brilliantly — 

(S) " You have preferred to be called a Greek, 
Albucius, rather than a Roman and a Sabine, a 
fello^v-to^\TLsman of the centurions Pontius and 
Tritanus, famous and foremost men, yes, standard- 
bearers. Therefore I as praetor greet you at Athens 
in Greek, when you approach me, just as you pre- 
ferred. ' Good-cheer, Titus,' say I in Greek. ' Good- 
cheer ' say the attendants, all my troop and band. 
That's why Albucius is foe to me; that's why he's 
an enemy ! " 



BOOK III 

contained not only the account to a friend of the journey 
actually taken, but also a separate propempticon (farewell 
poem) to the same friend for a future journey as well, the 
fragments of this being distinguishable by the use of the second 
person. My view is that this advice to a friend is given 
by the poet in the course of the narrative of the journey. 

Porphyrio on Horace's first satire : Horace in this satire 
tries to rival Lucilius by describing his journey from Rome to 
Brundisium, which the latter satirist also did in his third 
book, first from Rome as far as Capua, and thence to the 
Sicilian Strait. 

31 



LUCILIUS 

94-5 

Nonius, 475, 20 : ' Partiret ' pro partiretur. . . . Luciliiis 
lib. Ill— 

Tu partem laudis capercs, tu gaudia mecum 
partisses. 

96-7 

Nonius, G3, 4 : Est . . . gruma mensura quaedam, qua 
fixa viae ad lineam diriguntur, ut est agrimensorum et talium. 

viamque 
degrumavisti ut castris mensor facit olim ? 

98 

Nonius, 489, 11 : Ab eo quod est labos labosum facit, non 
laboriosum. Lucilius satyrarum lib. Ill — 

Praeterea omne iter est hoc labosum atque lutosum. 

99-100 

Nonius, 150, 18: ' Praeoox ' et ' praecoca ' quod est 
immatura ... — 

annicula aspera equa atque 
praecoca. 

101 

Porphyrio, ad Hor. S., I, 6, 106 : ' Mantica cui lumbos 
onere ulceret.' Mantica pera est, sed hoc ex Luciliano illo 
sumptum est — 

Mantica cantheri costas gravitate premebat. 

^^ degrumavisti W degrumatus Onions degrumabis 
Mercier ut in Merula uti ]\Ir., Onions viamque 
degrumavis ut castris cdd. 

^^ lamosum Keller 

99-100 aspera equa atque | praecoca H, C.Q., I, 148-9 
annicula v. cd. Dausae, ed. aim. 1471 anicula aspera atque 
praecox cdd. ; vide Linds. 

1"! trih. lib. Ill D(I.) 

32 



BOOK III 

94-5 

Address by the poet to his friend {mock grand style ?) : 
Nonius : ' Partiret ' for ' partiretur.' . . . Lucilius in 
hk. Ill— 

You too would be taking a part of the renown that 
is mine, you would have shared the joys with me. 

96-7 

Marking rest-places on a map before leaving Borne ? 

Nonius : The ' gruma ' is a certain measuring instrument 
by which, when set up, roads are set to a straight line ; it is 
used for example by land-surveyors and the like ... — 

and have you levelled off the road as sometimes 
a camp-surveyor does in a camp ? 

98 
A. To Capua 

Lucilius and company have started out ; a bad bit of road : 
Nonius (mistaking the quantity of the first syllable of 
' labosum ') : Lucilius in the third book of the Satires makes, 
from the word ' labos,' ' labosum ' not ' laboriosum — ' 

Moreover the whole of this journey is slippery and 
slimy. 

99-100 

Means of travel ? : 

Nonius : ' Praecox ' and ' praecoca,' which means 
unripe ... — 

a bucking young yearling filly. 

101 

Heavy load of one of the pack-animals : 

Porphyrio, on ' whose loins a portmanteau chafes with its 
load ' in Horace : ' Mantica ' is a bag ; and this is taken from 
that well-known theme of Lucilius — 

The portmanteau pressed heavily on the mule's '^ 
ribs. 

" or, gelding's. 

33 
VOL. III. D 



LUCILIUS 

102-5 

Gellius, XVI, 9, 3 : Significat ' susque deque ferre ' animo 
aequo esse et quod accidit non magni pendere atque interdum 
neglegere et contemncre ... — 

Verum haec ludus ibi, susque omnia deque fuerunt, 
susque haec deque fuere inquam omnia ludus 

iocusque ; 
illud opus durum, ut Setinum accessimus finem, 
alyikiiroi montes, Aetnae omnes, asperi Athones. 

106 - 

lulius Romanus, ap. Charis., G.L., I, 203, 20 K : ' Longe ' 
pro longitudine ... — 

<Volturnus Capua) longe III milia passum. 

op. [Asconius] ad Cic. Verr., Act. II, lib. I, 125, p. 193. 

107-8 
Nonius, 396, 13 : ' Sumere ' etiam significat eligere ... — 
* et spatium curando corpori honestum 
sumemus.' 

109-10 

Nonius, 25, 22 : ' Bronci ' sunt product© ore et dentibus 
prominentibus ... — 

' Broncus Bovillanus dente adverso eminulo hie est 
rinoceros.' 

^"^ susque haec D(F.) susque ea B susque et cdd. 

^"^ alyiXiTT^s Francken "proh. M 

^°^ terminus hie est | Volturnus Capua Becker, Phil., IV, 
82 sqq. coll. \Ascon.] ad Cic, Verr., Act. II., lib. I, 125, p. 193 : 
eminus est Volturnus Capua tria millia passuum 

^°' corpori D(r.) corpore cdd. 

^"^ sumimus coni. Terzaghi 

^°^ broccus M BoviUanus T alii alia novit lanus 
cdd. 

34 



BOOK III 

102-5 

They reach Setia along the Appian Way : 

Gellius : ' Susque deque <* ferre ' means to be of an even 
mind and to think of little weight anything which takes place, 
and now and then it means to neglect and despise ... — 

But there ^ all this was play and everything was 
free and easy, all this I say was free and easy, play and 
fun ; but when we reached the boundary of Setia — 
that was a hard business — goat-clambered mountains, 
all Aetnas and rugged Athoses. 

106 

Julius Romanus : ' Longe ' instead of ' longitudine ' . — 

The Volturnus, three thousand paces distant from 
Capua. 

107-8 

They decide to stay at Capua : '' 

Nonius : ' Sumere ' has also the meaning to choose ... — 

" and we'll take a good breathing space to refresh 
our persons." 

109-10 

B. At Capua, where they see a contest between tioo gladiators : ^ 

Nonius : ' Bronci ' are men who have a jutting jaw and 
prominent teeth ... — 

" This jut-mouth of Bovillae, with his one little 
projecting tooth, is a very rhinoceros." 

" up and down, topsy-turvey, higgledy-piggledy. 
^ on the Arician slope. 

'^ Thus Marx and others. At Cape Palinurus (see below) 
argues Cichor., 254. 

** There were two ' schools ' {ludi) of gladiators at Capua. 

35 
d2 



LUCILIUS 

111 

Nonius, 217, 12 : ' Posticam ' ferainino genere consuetudine 
appellamus ... — 

* Non peperit, verum postica parte profudit.' 

112-13 

Gellius, III, 14, 8 : Dimidium est non quod ipsum dimi- 
diatum est sed quae ex dimidiato pars altera est . . . itaque 
Lucilius eadem secutus ... — 

* uno oculo, pedibusque duobus, dimidiatus, 
ut porcus.' 

114 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 501, 10 K : Deponentia in -rior 
desinentia . . . tam secundum tertiam quam secundum 
quartam coniugationem declinaverunt auctores ... — 

' Conturbare animam potis est quicumque adoritur.' 

115-16 

Donatus ad Ter., Phorm., I, 3, 11: ' Amore abundas.' 
Abundare dicitur qui successu prospero affluit ... — 

Ille alter abundans 
cum septem incolumis pinnis redit et recipit se.* 

117 

Nonius, 123, 25 : ' Incitas ' dicitur egestas ... — 
illud ad incita cum redit atque internecionem, 

^^^ peperi Flor. 3 

"2-13 lii)^ I trib. Fiske (310, 363, n. 221), lib. XV Corpet 

" or ' like a halved pig,' hung up in a butcher's shop. 

* or ' confuse his senses ' ; cp. Lucretius, III, 483 (vemens 
violentia vini | conturbare animam consuevit) ; Cicero, Tusc, 
III, 15 (conturbatus animus). But here perhaps it means 
' knock the wind out,' ' knock the life out.' Possibly : ' He 
is able to knock the life out of anyone whosoever attacks 
him.' 

36 



BOOK III 
111 

Nonius : We habitually speak of ' postica ' in the feminine 
gender ... — 

" She didn't bring him forth but from the hinder 
part she sprawled him forth." 

112-3 

Gellius : A half is not that which itself has been halved, 
but that which is one of the two parts of that which has been 
halved. . . . Therefore Lucilius following the same principle 
says — 

" having one eye and two feet, halved like a pig." " 

114 

Priscianus : Authors have inflected deponent verbs ending in 
rior both in the third and in the fourth conjugation ... — 

' Whoever is the attacker can knock his senses 
out of him.' ^ 

115-6 

Donatus, on ' You billow over in love ' in Terence : 
' Abundare ' is a term used of him who ' overflows ' with 
prosperous success ... — 

" Look, one of the two. billowino; over \vi\h. seven 
feathers ^ lunges ^ again and withdraws unscathed." 

117 

Nonius : ' Incitas ' is a term for ' egestas ' . . . — 
..." when yonder fight comes to a standstill,'^ to 
slaughter," 

'^ This seems to refer to one of the fighters who, as a 
gladiator of the kind QoXled pinnirapi, has torn several feathers 
from his rival's head-crest. 

^ or redit may be the same as recipit se. 

^ incitae (sc. calces), or incita (neuter), comes from incitus 
and refers to pieces (on a gaming-board) which cannot be 
moved within the rules of the game. 

37 



LUCILIUS 

118 

Paulus, ex Test., 88, 4 : ' Minorem Dclum ' Puteolos esse 
dixerunt . . . municipium Graecum antea AiKaiapx^a voci- 
tatuin est. Uncle Lucilius — 

inde Dicarchitum populos Delumque minorem. 



119 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., I, 244 : ' Superare ' nauticus sermo 
est. Lucilius — 

. . . promontorium remis superamus Minervae. 



120 

Gellius, I, 16, 2 : Lucilius in tertio satyrarum — 
ad portam mille a portu est exinde Salernam. 
' mille,' inquit, ' est,' non ' mille sunt.' 

Cp. Macrob., 8., I, 5, 6. 



121 

Probus, ad Verg., G., HI, 146 : Silarus flumen est Lucaniae. 
Portus Alburnus et eiusdem nominis mons ad sextum a Primis 
Tabernis. Mentioncm facit Lucilius hoc versu — 

Quattuor hinc Silari ad flumen portumque Alburnum. 

118. 119. 121 trib. lib. ///D(L) 

"^ Dicarchitum Unger diciarchitum vel -icura cdd. 

^^' hino p. Terzaghi 

1^" portu Lafayc, Bev. Phil., XXXV, 24 portam GelL, 
Macrob. sex inde Macrob. Salernam W {adiecliviim ; cp. 
Sil., VIII, 853) Salernum Macrob. salternum cdd. 
Gell. alii alia 

38 



BOOK III 

118 

C. Beyond Capua 

The travellers go on to Puteoli : 

Paulus : They said that Puteoli was ' Lesser Delos.' . . . 
As a Greek country town Puteoli was formerly often called 
by the name Dicaearcliia. Whence Lucihus — 

thence to the peoples " who form the Dicarchitae, 
to Lesser Delos. 

119 

They go by sea from Puteoli, passing Cape Campanella : 

Servius, supplemented : ' Superare ' is a sailors' word. 
Lucilius — 

Our oars doubled Minerva's headland. 

120 

They call at Salernum : 

Gellius : Lucilius, in the third (book) of the Satires — 

And then from Salernum 's harbour to its gate 

it is a thou'^and of paces. 

writes ' it is a thousand,' not ' there are a thousand.' 

121 

They sail to Portus Alburnus : 

Probus : Silarus is a river of Lucania. The haven Alburnus 
and a mountain of the same name are about the sixth mile- 
stone from Primae Tabemae (The First Inns). Lucilius makes 
mention of them in this Line — 

From here four hours to Silarus' stream and 
Alburnus Haven. 

" peoples — i.e. the original Greek inhabitants, and the 
members of the Roman colony sent in 194 b.c. Dicarchitum = 
AiKopxtTcuv; Ai/capxia may have been a local form of the real 
name AtKatap;;^ta. 

39 



LUCILIUS 

122 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., X, 244 : Alii more antique ' lux ' 
pro luce accipiunt. . . . Lucilius in tertio — 

Hinc media remis Palinurum pervenio nox. 

123 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 209, 6 K: 'Caupo,' 'caupona' . . . 
significat tam ipsam tabernam quam mulierem ... — 

caupona hie tamen una Syra . . . 
124 

Nonius, 20, 29 : ' Cernuus ' dicitur proprie inclinatus, quasi 
quod terram cernat ... — 

Cernuus extemplo plantas convestit honestas. 

125 

Charisius ap. G.L., I, 72, 6 K : ' Lignum ' singulariter dici 
semper debet in multitudine . . . Lucilius III . . . idem in 
eodem ligna pluraliter dicit — 

" Scindent hi ligna, videte." 

126 

Nonius, 216, 4 : ' Ostrea ' generis feminini ... — 
Ostrea nulla fuit, non purpura, nulla peloris, 

125 scindent W [fortasse cudent) si dent Buecheler 
scindunt vel findunt INIr. student cd, videte cd. 

bipenne Mr. videre ed. princ. 

<» or one inn, called 'The Syrian Hostess.' Virg., Cop., 1. 

* Thus Marx interprets cernvns (cf. Paul, ex Fest., 38, 42 ; 
Isid., Orig., XIX, 34, 13. We have cernuus again in 
Lucilius, Bk. XXVII, pp. 250-1). But cernuus comes really 
from the root kar, as Kapa, cerebrum, celsus, etc., and Nonius' 

40 



BOOK III 
122 

Bowing brings them to Cape Palinuro by night ; 

Servius (supplemented); Some, after the archaic manner, 
take the word ' lux ' for ' luce.' . . . Lucilius in the third 
(book) has ' nox ' for ' nocte.' 

From here my oars brought me along to Palinurus 
at mid night. 

123 

But they find lodging ; their hostess : 

Priscianus : * Caupo,' ' caupona ' ; . . . the latter means 
equally the inn and its mistress ... — 

still here one Syrian " hostess . . . 

121 

she puts on her shoes : 

Nonius : ' Cernuus ' is properly a term for bent over, as it 
were because the person looks at (cernit) the ground. ... — 

Forthwith the shoe ^ covered her pretty feet. 

125 

A fire is made ready ; the hostess speaks ? : 

Charisius : ' Lignum ' should always be used in the singular 
number in dealing with a quantity . . . Lucilius in book 
III . . . the same poet in the same book uses the plural form 
' ligna ' — 

" These slaves will split some firewood. Look 
to it." 

126 
"Simple fare is served : 

Nonius : ' Ostrea ' of the feminine gender ... — 
There was no oyster, no purple fish, no giant mussel, 

lemma implies a context with a man stooping. If so, the line 
refers to a male assistant of the hostess. ' Forthwith he stoop- 
ing shoed his noble feet.' P/a;tto is the sole of the foot. The 
diction is mock-tragic (hit at Accius ?). 

41 



LUCILIUS 

127 

Charisius ajp. G.L., I, 72, 7 K : Fascca dicuntur asparagi 
quamvis asparagos pluraliter dicamus, ut Lucilius 111 — 

asparagi nulli, 

128-9 

Scholl,, ad Hor., S., I., 3, 56[: ' Incnistari ' vas dicitur, cum 
aliquo vitioso suco inlinitur at que inquinatur, secundum quod 
et Lucilius in III — 

nam mel regionibus illis 
incrusjtatus calix rutai^caulis habetm*. 

isoT 

Nonius, 164, 26 : ' Ructus ' a ructando dictus ... — 
Exhalas turn acidos ex pectore ructus. 

131 

Nonius, 455, 37 : ' Rictum ' ferarum dici volunt, cum 
Titinius auctor sit etiam hominis dici debere ... — 

Malas toUimus nos atque utimur. . . . rictu. 

132 

Nonius, 173, 11 : * Sententia ' sensibilitas ... — 

Vertitur oenophori fundus, sententia nobis. 

cp. Isid., Orig., I, 35, 3 ; XX, 6, 1 ; Schol. ad Pers., S., V, 140; 
Consent., G.L., V, 345, 21 K. 



129 rutai L rutia, ruta cdd. trib. lib. I V Aero 

1^" exhalans Tcrzaghi tarn Mr. 

1^1 utimus Rutgers 

"- oenophoris Non., Isid., 1 forUisse ocnophoru 

42 



BOOK III 
127 

Charisius : Men speak of bundles of asparagus, although we 
use the plural asparaguses, for example Lucilius in book III — 

no asparaguses, 

128-9 

Scholiasts on ' incrustare ' in Horace : A vessel is said to be 
incrusted when it is besmeared and made dirty with some 
foul moisture; in accordance with this Lucilius also says in 
the third book of the Satires — 

. . . for in those regions the dirt-coated pot and the 
stalk of rue are esteemed as honey-sweet. 

130 

which brings indigestion : 

Nonius : ' Ructus ' is a term derived from ' ructare ' (to 
belch) . . . — 

Then you puff out sour belches from your chest. 

131 

But the travellers eat and drink heartily : 

Nonius : They would have it that ' rictus ' (open mouth) 
is a term applicable only to wild animals, though Titinius 
informs us that it should be used even of a man ... — 

We lift wide our jaws and regale with grin and 
gape. 

132 

Nonius : ' Sententia,' the same as ' sensibilitas ' (feel- 
ings) . . .— 

The bottom of the wine-holder was turned upside 
down, and so were our feelings.'^ 

* i.e. the good wine caused us to change our intention 
of seeking a better irm ? or to get drunk ? 

43 



LUCILIUS 

133-4 

Nonius, 279, 24 : ' Dcponcre ' est dcsperare ... — 

Symmacus praeterea iam turn depostus bubulcus 
expirans animam pulmonibus aeger agebat. 

cp. Non. 38, 25. 

135 

Servius auctus, ad Verg., Ed., VI, 53 : Apud veteres unus 
quisque eo super quod iacebat ' fultus ' dicebatur. Lucilius 
in tertio — 

et pulvino fultus. 

136-7 

Nonius, 489, 14 : ' Nefantia ' pro nefanda ... — 

Tantalus qui poenas, ob facta nefantia, poenas 
pendit. 

138-9 

Diomedes, ap. G.L.-. I, 376, 12 K : Expergitus dicitur qui 
satiatus somno sponte evigilat. Unde et Lucilius ait — 

Ergo 
e somno pueros cum mane expergitus clamo, 

Cp. Prise, ap. (?.L., II, 513, 1 K : . . . (Lucilius in III . . .) 

133-4 (lepositus cdd. expirans Non. 38 [s. v. ' expirare ') 
exalans 279 

136-7 nefantia poenas pendit cdd. {om. poenas Par. 7665 
Montepess. Ox.) nefantia pronus pendit Lafaye, Rev. Phil., 
XXXV, 21 

138 grgQ ■))ulg^ ego Diomed. om. Prise. 

1^* clamo Diomed. clamas Prise. 

44 



BOOK III 

133^ 

Symmachus {''.employed on one of Lucilius' estates) was ill : 
Nonius : ' Deponere ' means to despair of . . . — 

Besides this, Symmachus the ploughman was 
ah'eady by that time despaired of, sick in the lungs, 
breathing his last, giving up the ghost. ^ 



135 

Servius (supplemented) : In the old writers everyone was 
said to be propped up {fiiltus) by that on which he might be 
lying. Lucilius in the third book — 

and propped up by a pillow. 

136-7 

Trouble after eating and drinking too well ? : 

Nonius : ' Nefantia ' instead of ' nefanda ' . . . — 

Tantalus, who pays a penalty, yea a penalty, for 
his abominable deeds. 

138-9 
Dawn comes : 

Diomedes : The term ' expergitus ' is applied to a man who, 
satiated with sleep, wakes up of his own accord. "Whence 
also Lucilius says — 

therefore when, awake from my sleep in the 
morning, I bawled for the slave-boys, 

" This fragment seems to fit best here. It is usually put 
earlier as giving the reason for Lucilius' journey — see Marx, and 
Cichor., 252, F. 315. 

45 



LUCILIUS 

140-1 

Nonius, 266, 21 : ' Conmodum,' integrum, totum. 
Lucilius — 

bis qiiina octogena videbis 

commoda te, Capua quinquaginta atque ducenta. 



142 

Porphyrio, ad Hor. )S., I, 10, 30 : ' Bilinguis ' dicitur, 
quoniam utraque lingua usi sunt. . . . Ennius et Lucilins — 

Bruttace bilingui. 
Cp. Paulus, ex Festo, 25, 20. 



143-5 

Probus ad Verg., Ed., 326, 17 H : Facelitis autem Dianae 
Lucilius quoque in tertio satyr-arum meminit sic — 

et saepe quod ante 
optasti, freta, Messanam, Regina videbis 
moenia, turn Liparas, Facelinae templa Dianae. 



146-7 
Nonius, 21, 11 : ' Stricturae ' . . . — 
crebrae ut scintillae, in stricturis quod genus olim 
ferventi ferro. 

i*f^i trih. lib. Ill I) (I.) 

1'*^ te cdd. tunc Mr. at e Linds. 

1*2 trib. lib. Ill Mr. 



46 



BOOK III 
140-1 

The travellers sail from Palinuro to a point in the Gulf of 
S. Eufemia : 

Nonius : ' Gommodum ' (having full measure), complete, 
whole. Lucilius — 

you will see that you have travelled twice eighty 
five thousand paces in full measure, and two hundred 
and fifty thousand paces from Capua. 

142 

The Bruttians : 

Porphyrio, on ' bilinguis ' in Horace : ' Bilinguis ' is the 
term used because the Canusians spoke both languages {Greek 
and Oscan).'^ . . . Ennius and Lucilius — 

a Bruttian speaking two languages. 

143-5 

The travellers cross to the neighbourhood of Mylae : 

Probus : Of Faceline Diana Lucilius also makes mention in 
the third book of the Satires, thus — 

and, as you often expressed a wish to do, you 
will see the straits and Messana, the walls of Regium, 
and then the Liparae and the temple of Faceline 
Diana. 

146-7 
They see StromboU in eruption as they sail * pa^by night : 
Nonius : ' Stricturae ' . . . — 

as crowds of sparks, of the kind we see sometimes 
round lumps of metal when the iron is red hot. 

'^ Oscan, as shewn bv Paul, ex Fest., 35. 
^ Cf. Marx, Rh. Mus., LXXV, 235-6. 

47 



LUCILIUS 

US 
Nonius, 206, 17 : ' Forum ' . . . masculini ... — 
llomanis ludis for us olim ornatus lucernis. 
Cp. Charis., ap. G.L., I, 71, 32 K. 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 10, 53 : ' Nil comis tragici mutat 
Lucilius Acci ? ' Facit autem haec Lucilius cum alias, tum vel 
maxime in tertio libro. 



LIBER IV 

Sat. I. 

We cannot very well trace any division of this book into 
several satires, but it seems to me that there were two — one 
on the simple city or country life of the poet's own day 
contrasted with the luxury of the towns, and another on a 

149 

Nonius, 206, 26 : 'Fulmentum.' . . . feminino Lucilius . . . 
Ub. IV— 

Subicit huic fulcrum, fulmentas quattuor addit. 

150-1 

Nonius, 207, 27 : ' Genu ' . . . masculini ... — 

Haeret verticulis adfixum in posteriore 
parte at que articulis, nam ut nobis talus genusque 
est. 

Cp. Fest., 564, 14, et Paul., ex F., 565, 4. 



^** subicit Saumaise sucit cdd. fulcrum MS. Seal. 

soldum ]\Ir. fuldum cdd. 



48 



BOOK IV 

148 

Comparison of the sight loith the lamp-lit Roman forum : 
Nonius : ' Forum . . . ' in the masculine ... — 
as at times the forum decked with lamps at the 
Roman games. 
Luciliits in book III Tnocked Accius : 

Porphyrio on Horace : ' Is there nothing of the tragic poet 
Accius which polite Lucilius would alter ? ' In fact Lucilius 
does this both elsewhere and especially in the third " book. 



BOOK IV 

Sat. I. 

famous fight of gladiators. The book was written probably 
in 118 B.C. A scholiast tells us that Persius ' transferred ' 
his third satire, on the luxury and vices of the wealthy, from 
Lucilius' fourth book. 

149 

On the wastefulness of the rich in town : A. Simplicity 
of country-life ? Making a bedstead : 

Nonius : ' Fulmentum.' . . . Lucilius has it in the 
feminine ... in the fourth book — 

Under this he fixes a bed-post, and adds four 
supports. 

150-1 
Nonius : ' Genu ' ... of the masculine * . . . — 
It is fixed fast by sockets in the hind part and by- 
joints, for it is as the ankle-bone and the knee are 
to us. 

" Except perhaps lines 124, 136-7, no fragments from this 
book can be taken as attacking Accius. Cp. Lafaye, Rev. 
de Phil., XXXV, 26. 

* Marx thinks the fr. describes a man's neck-bone; it seems 
to carry on the making of a bedstead. Oenns is neuter. 

49 

VOL. III. E 



LUCILIUS 

152 

Festus, 252, 1 : ' Petimina ' in humcris iumentorum 
ulcera. . . . Lucilius meminit quom ait — 

ut petimen naso aut lumbos cervicibus tangat. 

Eo nomine autem et inter duos armos suis quod est aut 
pectus appellari solitum testatur Naevius. 

Cp. Paul., 253, 1. 



153 

Nonius, 16, 26: * Succusare ' est susum frequenter ex- 
cutere ... — 

succusatoris taetri tardique caballi 

Cp. Nonius, 86, 12 ( . . . lib. II). 



154 

Festus, 454, 9: ' Stlembus ' gravis, tar<dus, sicut 
Lucilius> — 

Apulidae ped<^ibus stlembi). 

Cp. Paul, 455, fin. 

155 

Nonius, 457, 7 : ' Catuli ' non solum canum diminutive, 
verum omnium animalium appellantur ... — 

concursaret agros, catulos fetumque feral. . . . 

i^-* Irib. lib. Ill Mr. 

1^^ ferai Mr. ferarum Pius ferat cdd. 

50 



BOOK IV 

152 

a hunter on a nag ? : 

Festus : ' Petimina,' " sores on the shoulders of beasts of 
burden. . . . Liicilius mentions them when he says — 

so that the rider touches with his nose the horse's 
chest or with his nape the buttocks. 

But that this word was habitually applied also to the 
breast or the space that lies between the two fore- quarters 
of a pig is testified by Naevius. 

153 

Nonius : ' Succusare ' (jolt from underneath) means to 
jerk upwards again and again ... — 

of a jolter, a loathsome lazy nag 



154 

Festus : ' Stlembus ' (draggmg the feet), heavy, slow, as 
Lucilius says — 



of Apulia, a foot-dragging beast. 



155 

encounterirog a wild beast with such a horse ? : 

Nonius : ' Catuli ' is a term applied diminutively to the 
young not only of dogs, but of all animals ... — 

were to ramble about the fields, and . . cubs, the 
brood of a wild animal. 

" This passage of Festus is our only source for the word 
petimen. In spite of his statement here, I translate it 
according to his second explanation. For Naevius' passage 
cf. Remains oj Old Latin, II, pp. 146-7. 

* sc. a horse, as Paulus shows. The form Apulidae is 
employed because it fits into a hexameter easily. 

51 

e2 



LUCILIUS 

156 

Festus, 488, 16 : S>pa<ra> parvissimi <generis iacula> 
. . . Lucilius — 

Turn spara, turn ru(mices portantur, tragula) porro. 

Cp. Paul., 489, 11 ; Nonius, 224, 3. 



157-8 

Nonius, 477, 8 : ' Manducatur ' pro manducat .... — 
Adsequitur nee opinantem, in eaput insilit, ipsum 
conmandueatur totum<(conplexa comestque). 

Cp. Non., 479, 1 ; 81, 29. 

159-60 
Servius auctus ad Aen., X, 329 : Lucilius in IV — 
" Hi prae se portant mi ingentes munere pisces 
triginta numero." 

161 
Nonius, 208, 16 : ' Grues ' genere feminino ... — 
Longior hie quam grus, grue tota, eum volat olim. 

156 suppl. ex Paul. murices Paul. ru<. . . cd. Fam. 
L. XVIII mu Fam. IV, A3 

158 conplexa comestque add. ex 81 

159 mi ingentes Mr. ingentes editt. mihi gentes cdd. 
1^1 congrus L grue cdd. grege D (I.) 

52 



BOOK IV 

156 

a7id with small loeapons : 

Festus : ' Spara,' javelins of the smallest kind . . . 
Lucilius — 

Then were brought along curved bolts, and then 
javelins, and further a strap-spear.'^ 

157-8 

Nonius : ' Manducatur ' for ' manducat ' . . . — 

She comes upon him by surprise, leaps upon his 
head, envelops him, chews and gobbles him all up too. 

159-60 

B. Contrast of the town. Table-Luxiiry. 

Rustic clients attend on a patron : * 

Servius (supplemented) : Lucilius in the fourth book — 

These carry before them huge fishes for me thirty 
in number, as a present. 

161 

a huge fish ? : 

Nonius : ' Grues ' in the feminine gender ... — 

This fellow's longer than a crane, than a whole 
crane, when it is in flight, as often seen.*^ 

" The weapons are hunting-weapons. 

^ A passage in Persius, III, 74 ff. suggests the clients were 
Marsians and others; Persius' third satire imitated Lucilius' 
fourth book (see above, p. 49). 

*■ i.e. the fish is longer than a crane looks in flight. Perhaps 
quam grus compares it with a crane walking, grue iota with a 
crane stretched out in flight. 

53 



LUCILIUS 

162-3 

Nonius, 427, 8 : ' Sebum ' et ' unguentura ' banc haLent 
diversitatem : sebum fit ex adipe ruminantium ... — 

" Tisiphone Tityi e pulmonibus atqiie adipe unguen 
excoctum attulit, Eumenidum sanctissima Erinys." 



164 
Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 485, 19 K : ' Turgeo,' tursi . . . — 
obtursi ebrius. 

165 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 522, 8 K : Vetustissimi . . . 
etiam ' edo cdis edit ' dicebant correpta prima syllaba ... — 

" Qui edit se hie comedit me." 

166 

Nonius, 158, 14 : ' Puellos ' pueros ... — 

" cumque hie tarn formosus homo ac te dignus 

puellus. 

Cp. Fast., 324, 15; Suet. ap. Priscian., ap. G.L., II, 231, 
23 K. 



162-3 Tityi e Mr. Titini M titene cdd. adipe 

Mercier adirem cdd. attulit Eumenidum lun. atuli 
Eumenidibus cdd. 

1®^ sese Fieckeisen fortasse sed 

16^ homo Fest., Suet. tibi Non. 

54 



BOOK IV 

162-3 
A nasty-looking dish ? : 

Nonius : Grease and ointment have this difference — grease 
is made from the lard-fat of cud- chewing animals ... — 

" Tisiphone, most holy Fury among the Gracious 
Ones, brought along oil boiled out of the fatty lungs of 

Tityos."« 

164 

Bevdry : 

Priscianus : ' Turgeo,' perfect tursi ... — 

' 1 swelled up drunk. 

165 

Host speaks of a sponger ? : 

Priscianus : The oldest writers used to say even ' edo, edis, 
edit,' with the first syllable shortened ... — 

" This fellow, Mho has gobbled his own substance, 
now gobbles up me." 

166 

Matters of sex : 

Nonius : ' Puellos,' the same as ' pueros ' . . . — 

" and when he is a person so shapely and a boy 
worthy of you." 

" Tisiphone was one of the Furies. The giant Tityos, for 
trying to outrage Latona, was punished by being condemned 
to have his liver eat«n by a vulture in the Lower World; 
his liver constantly renewed itself. 

55 



LUCILIUS 

167-9 

Nonius, 458, 2 : ' Sumen ' . . . Mulieris mammam sumen 
veteres dici volunt ... — 

Quod si nulla potest mulier tain corpore duro 
esse, tamen tenero manet cui sucus lacerto, 
et manus uberibus lactanti in sumine sidat," 

170-1 
Nonius, 231, 8 : ' Vectis ' generis masculini ... — 
ne agitare manu tu 
pessulum et hunc vectem possis : cuneis opus. 

SaL II. 

172-5 
Nonius, 393, 30 : ' Spurcum,' saevum vel sanguinarium 

Aeserninus fuit Flaccorum munere quidam 
Samnis, spurcus homo, vita ilia dignus locoque. 
Cum Pacideiano conponitur, optimus multo 
post homines natos gladiator qui fuit unus. 

Cp. Nonius, 257, 19; Cic., Tusc, II, 41; ad Q. Jr., Ill, 
4, 2; Quintil., IX, 4, 38; al. 

^^^ manet cui W manat quoi Mr, maneatque s. vel 

mancat suc(c)usque cdd. 

^^'^ minus Palmer uberibus M uberi cdd. uber- 
tim Mr, fortasse uberius 

1'" agitare Gerlach agitarem cdd. 

^'1 pessulum D(I.) pessulus cdd. opus M cuneost 
opus ipso Mr. cuneis ipso cdd. 

56 



BOOK IV 

167-9 

Nonius : ' Sumen ' ; The old writers would have the term 
' sumen ' used for even a woman's breast ... — 

" But if no woman can be so hard in body (as a 
man is), still she who has sap oozing within a tender 
sinew, whose hand may sink on milky teat and 
dugs," ^ 

170-1 

A lover at his mistress' door ? : j„^ ^,^^^ .n^*^^^^.- 

Nonius : ' Vectis ' is of the masculine gender ... — 

" that your hand can't make this bolt and bar 
move ; it's wedges you want. 

Sat. II. 
172-5 

. A fight betiveen tioo famous gladiators : 

Nonius : ' Spurcum ' (nasty, filthy, low), cruel or blood- 
thirsty * . . . — 

In the public show given by the Flacci was a 
certain Aeserninus, a Samnite, a nasty '^ fellow, 
worthy of that life and station. He was matched 
with Pacideianus, who was by far the best of all the 
gladiators since the creation of man. 

•* The right readings and meaning are not clear. Tenero 
(sc. corpore) maneat may be right; and lacerto may mean 
' arm ' or ' strength.' 

^ Nonius is doubtless wrong. 

" spurcus in the sense of base, common, low. Aeserninus 
may mean ' a man of Aesemia.' ' Samnis ' as on p. 59. 

^"'^ Aeserninus T {et Cic.) aserninus cdd, Non. serinus 
cdd. Quintil. munere T unae cdd, 

57 



LUCILIUS 

176-81 

Cicero, Tusc, IV, 21, 48 : In illo genere sit sane Pacideianus 
aliquis hoc animo, ut narrat Lucilius — 

" Occidam ilium equideni et vincam, si id quaeritis," 

inquit. 
" verum illud credo fore : in os prius accipiam ipse, 
quam gladium in stomacho siirdi ac pulmonibus sisto. 
Odi hominem, iratus pugno, nee longius quicquam 
nobis, quam dextrae gladium dum accommodet alter ; 
usque adeo studio atque odio illius ecferor ira." 

Cp. Serv. auct., ad Aen., XII, 646 (Lucilius VII usque adeo 
etc.) 

182-3 

Cicero, de oral.. Ill, 23, 86 : Velocius puer id didicerat, sed 
quod erat aptus ad illud, totumque cognorat. Fuit, ut est 
apud Lucilium — 

quam vis bonus ipse 
Samnis, in ludo ac rudibus cuivis satis asper. 

184 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 217, 8 K : Lucilius in IV 
' Aethiopus ' dixit pro Aethiops — 

rinocerus velut Aethiopus. 

185 
Nonius, 208, 12 : ' Gladius ' . . . Neutri Lucilius — 
Haerebat mucro gladiumque in pectore totum. 

i7«-8i trih.lih. /FMr. 

^"^ surdi W furia M furiae S furi Tischer 

sura Barth spurci Sef/ffert suria cdd. 
182-3 trib. lib. IV vel lit D (F.) 
185 ex Uhro IV ? gladiumque D(I.) gladium cdd. 

58 



BOOK IV 

176-81 

Pacideianus speaks to the onlookers, or to the givers of the 
show : 

Cicero : Let us assume in that profession a very Paci- 
deianus to be of such a spirit as Lucilius tells — 

" I'll simply kill him and win, if that's what you 
want," said he. " But I think it'll come about thus — 
first I'll take his blows on my own face ; after that 
I'll stick my sword in that dunderhead's gullet and 
lungs. Curse the fellow, I'll fight in a temper, and 
not a minute longer will we delay than it takes 
either of us to fit his sword to his right hand. So 
much am I transported with anger, fed by my passion 
and hatred of him." 

182-3 

Pacideianus again on Aeserninus ? : 

Cicero : The slave-boy had learnt his job rather more 
quickly than usual (of course it was because he was fitted for 
that business) and knew the whole thing ofE. He was, as 
occurs in Lucilius — 

" ever° so good a Samnite himself, rough enough 
for any one in the sport of quarter-staffs." 

184 
One of the gladiators viakes a successful rush : 
Priscianus : Lucilius in the fourth book used the form 
' Aethiopus ' for ' Aethiops ' — 

like an Aethiopic rhinoceros. 

185 
Nonius : ' Gladius ' . . . Lucilius has it in the neuter — 
the point, and the whole sword too, was sticking 
in his breast. 

" or, ' although.' A ' Samnis ' was a gladiator armed with 
Samnite weapons. 

59 



LUCILIUS 
LIBER V 

Sat. I. 

186-93 

Gellius, XVIII, 8 : 'O/MotoTeAeura . . . ceteraque huius- 
modi scitamenta . . . quam sint insubida et inertia et 
puerilia facetissime hercle significat in quinto Saturarum 
Lucilius. Nam ubi est cum amico conquestus quod ad se 
aegrotum non viseret, haec ibidem addit festiviter — 

Quo me habeam pacto, tarn etsi non quaeris, docebo, 
quando in eo numero mansi quo in maxima non est 
pars hominum. . . . 

ut periisse velis, quem visere * nolueris ' cum 
debueris. Hoc * nolueris ' et ' debueris ' te 
si minus delectat, quod atechnon et Eisocration 
lerodesque simul totum ac sit meiraciodes, 
non operam perdo, si tu hie. 

194-5 
Nonius, 173, 11 : ' Sententia ' . . . idem lib V — 
si tarn corpus loco validum ac regione maneret 
scriptoris, quam vera manet sententia cordi. 

^^2 XrjpwSes S oxAr/pajSeaque vel sim. cdd. ac sit H 

Eissocratium hoc ac si M symmiraciodes vel sim. cdd. 

<* This book, written about the turn of the years 117 and 
116, seems to have contained two subjects, though it is not 
possible to reach any certainty as to whether each theme con- 
sisted of a single satire or of several. 

6o 



BOOK V 



BOOK V« 

Sat. I. A letter of Lucilius to a friend who had not 'paid a 
visit to the poet in sickness. 

186-93 

Gellius : Upon my word — how very humourously does 
Lucilius in the fifth (book) of the Satires point out the stupidity, 
the idleness and the childishness of ' homoeoteleuta ' (things 
which end alike) . . . and all the other pretty tricks of this 
sort. . . . For when he complained with a friend on the 
ground that he did not come to see him in sickness, then and 
there he went on to say most cheerfully — 

Although you do not ask after me, still I M'ill let 
you know how I find myself, since I have managed to 
stay among the number in which the greater part of 
mankind is not found . . . that you wish that man 
to have passed away whom you ivould not come and 
see when you should have. If this ' would ' and 
' should ' is not to your liking because, you say, it 
is all without art,^ and Isocratian, and all rubbish and 
withal childish — I won't waste my time, if that's the 
kind you are/ 

194-5 

Nonius : ' Sententia ' . . . the same in the fifth book — 

if only the writer's body had strength to stay in 
its place and at its post even as the feeling of truth 
stays in his heart. 

^ atechnon (ar-rxvov) = iners, not deserving the name of art. 
The fault of Isocrates was that he wrote letters like speeches. 

' Cp. Leo, G.G.A., 1906, (i), 846; Fiske, 110, 432-3; 
Housman, C.Q., I, 149-151. 

6i 



LUCILIUS 

196 



Paulus, 343, 5 : ' Qucrqueram ' frigidatn cum tremore a 
Graeco Kapnapa certum est dici, unde et career. Lucilius 

Querquera consequitur . . . capitisque dolores. 
Cp. Fest., 3-42, fin. 



197 
Festus, 370, 4 :— 

Rhondes Icadionque 

cum dixit LucUius, duo nomina piratarum posuit, tarn in- 
festum sibi corpus et valetudinem referens, quam iUi assent 
saluti navigantium. 

198-9 

Nonius, 13, 11 : ' Crepera ' res proprie dicitur dubia ... — 

Fannius solus niihi in niagno niaerore <(repostor)> 
tristitia in summa, crepera re inventus salutis. 

Sat. II. 

It seems to me that a Roman glutton Gallonius is com- 
pared with a country host. Both are laughed at. Then 

Pseudo-Acro ad Hor., ^S'., II, 2, 47 : ' Hand ita pridem 
GaUoni praeconis erat acipensere mensa infamis.' Gallonius 
quidam fuit praeco, qui habebat apparatum convivium, quem 
Lucilius etiam pulsat. Hie etiam acipenserem piscem suis 
conviviis exhibebat. 

^^^ consequitur<tussim>Terzaghi <lateris>M 

19G-7 ex libro V ? 

^^^ Fannius {vel sannio vd sanus) W sed nunc i\I set 
nunc Mr. nam tu L sane nunc Corpet sannunt cdd. 
sohis D(I.) sol is M sohs cdd. post macrore add. 
metuque 8 datorque M repostor addidi coll. Ov., F., II, G3 

^®" re add S saluti es L 
62 



BOOK V 

196 

my sickness attacked me like pirates : 

Paulus : It is certain that the word ' querquera,' a cold 
fever accompanied by shivering, is derived from the Greek 
KapKapa, whence also comes ' career.' Lucilius ... — 

Then follows ague and headache. 

197 

Festus : Lucilius, in saying — 

Rhondes and Icadion 

brought in the names of two pirates by way of telling that 
his body and his bad health were just such a nuisance to him 
as they were to the safety of seafarers." 

198-9 

someone other than you saved me : 

Nonius : ' Crepera ' (dusty, dark) is a term properly used 
of a thing which is doubtful ... — 

Fannius '' alone was found to be for me a restorer 
of safety in my great grief and deep misery and 
darksome trial. 

Sat. II. 

follows an ideal dinner. But the attribution of the several 
fragments on Gallonius to any book must be quite uncertain. 

(A) A feast given by Gallonius : Laelius attacks him among 
other gluttons : 

Pseudo-Acro, on a mention of Gallonius by Horace : A 
certain Gallonius was a herald who held feasts with rich menu ; 
Lucilius also attacks him. He even used to put on show a 
sturgeon at his feasts. 

« Cichor., 51, 3 : cp. Paulus, 106, 15. Staph. Byz., s.v. 
Vovhpai, s.v. 'Poi'Satoi ; Gic, de Fato, 3, 5. 

* If this reading is right we have either a reference to one of 
Lucilius' friends or an allusion to the lex Fannia of 161 b.c. 
which enjoined simple fare (Geil., II, 24, 2). 

63 



LUCILIUS 

200-7 

Cic, de Fin., II, 8, 24, 25 : Nee ille, qui Diogenem Stoicum 
adulescens, post autem Panaetium audierat, Laelius, eo 
dictus est sapiens quod non intellegcret quid suavissimum 
asset ... — 

o lapathe, ut iactare, nee es satis cognitus qui sis ! 
in quo Laelius clamores sophos ille solebat 
edere, conipellans gumias ex ordine nostros. 

Praeclare Laelius, et recte sophos. Illudque vere — 
" o Publi, o gurges Galloni, es homo miser " inqult. 
" Cenasti in vita numquam bene, cum omnia in ista 
consumis squilla at que acupensere cum decimano." 

Is haec loquitur qui . . . non negat libenter umquam 
cenasse Gallonium (mentiretur enim), sed bene. . . . Semper 
Laelius bene. Quid bene ? Dicet Lucilius (Cic., ad Alt., XIII, 
52, 1)— 

" bene cocto et 
condito, sermone bono et, si quaeris, libenter." 

208-10 
Nonius, 445, 23 : ' Multum ' et ' satis ' . . . 
Nam si, quod satis est homini, id satis esse potisset, 
hoc sat erat ; nunc cum hoc non est, qui credimus porro 
divitias ullas animum mi explere potisse ? " 

200-7 ex libro V ? {trib. lib. IV D (F.)) 

205 acupensere Mr. acipensere ecld. accubans acre 
cdd. (accubant Erlang.) 

206 om. et Cic. de Fin. 

208 potisset vel potuisset cdd. potesset quid. ap. D (F.) 
2^0 potisse vel posse cdd. potesse quid. ap. D (F.) 

" This is probably the meaning; but it might be ' how art 
thou discussed.' Not ' boasted about ' ? 

" Shero, C.P., XVIII, 133 ; Fiske, 161. cum in both places 
is temporal, cf. Housman, C.Q., I, 67. For decimanus ' very 
big,' like every tenth wave, see pp. 168, 186-7, 192, 397. 

64 



BOOK V 

200-7 

Cicero : Our Laelius, who as a young man had heard 
lectures given by Diogenes the Stoic and later by Panaetius, 
was called wise not because he did not understand what made 
the pleasantest eating ... — 

O sorrel, how art thou a plaything of scorn," and 
men know not well enough what thy worth is. About 
this plant Laelius our * savant ' used to shout praises 
when he was reproaching all our gluttons one by one. 

Brilliantly said by Laelius ; and he is rightly called ' savant.' 
This too is a true hit — 

" O Publius, O glutton Gallonlus, you're a poor 
fellow," says he. " You've never dined well in your 
life, even when you waste all you have on that lobster 
and on that sturgeon, in size a number ten." ^ 

The man who speaks these words is one who . . . does not 
deny that GaUonius ever dined with a will (for he would be 
telling an untruth), but he denies that he dined well. . . . 
LaeHus dined always well. What does ' well ' mean ? 
Lucilius shall tell us — 

with <^ well cooked and well seasoned food, pleasant 
conversation, and, if you want to know, with a will." 

208-10 

Nonius : ' Multum ' and ' satis ' . . . — 

" For if that which is enough for a man could have 
been enough for me, then that (which I have) were 
enough ; but, as things are, since this is not so, 
how can I believe that any riches can fulfil my 
heart's desire hereafter? " 

'^ The extra words bene ... e/ ... e^ we get from Cic, 
ad Ait., XIII, 52, 1. It is just possible that cocto and condito 
refer not to food but to sermone unexpectedly added. Biit the 
context in Cicero tells against this. I put the two lines here as 
probably put into the mouth of Laelius. 

65 
VOL. III. F 



LUCILIUS 

211-2 

C. G. L., V, 233, 21, s. v. pila : Peritissimi lusores habiti 
sunt Coelius adque Veturius. De Coelio sic dicit Lucilius — 

Coelius conlusor Galloni scurra, trigonum 
cum hidet, scius ludet et eludet . . . 

213 

Nonius, 497, 4 : Accusativus posit us pro ablative ... — 
Laevius pauperem ail se ingentia munera fungi. 

214 

Priscianus, ap. G. L., II, 502, 20 K : Lucilius ... — 

Deficit alma Ceres, nee plebes pane potitur, 

secundum quartam coniugationem producta paenultima 
protulit. 

215 

Explan. in Donatum, G.L., IV, 542, 28 K : ' Sero fruges ' 
. . ' sevi ' ut Lucilius — 

Hie sunt herbae quas sevit luppiter ipse. 

216 
Nonius, 201, 1 : ' Cepe ' generis neutri ... — 
flebile cepe simul lacrimosaeque ordine tallae. 

212 scius H., C.Q., I, 157-8 solus cd. 

213 Laevius vel Laelius cdd, 
215 trib. lib. V Bouterwek 

" or, 'parry.' This seems to be the sense of eludet here; 
cf. Lindsay, C.Q., XX. 102 ; he takes eludet as ' he will win.' 
^ Cichorius, 270-1. But the right reading may be Laelius. 

66 



BOOK V 

211-2 

Gallonius : 

A gloss, on ' pila ' : Coelius and Veturius were held to be the 
skilfulest players. About Coelius Lucilius speaks thus : — 

Coelius the buffoon, player with Gallonius, when he 

plays at three-corner ball, will knowingly play and 

outplay ^ . . . 

213 
(B) A tneal given by a countryman Laevius ? * 
Nonius : The accusative put for the ablative ... — 
Laevius says that though poor he performs vastly 

important duties. 

2U 
Priscianus : Lucilius ... — 
The nurturing grain runs short, and the common 

folk get no bread,^ 

inflected ' potior ' according to the fourth conjugation, 
lengthening the penultimate syllable (' potiri,' ' potitur '). 

215 

He values his coarse food highly : 

A commentator on Donatus : ' Sero ' (sow seeds) . . . 
perfect ' sevi ' ; for example Lucilius — 

Here are plants sown by Jupiter himself. 

216 
Various potherbs are served : 
Nonius : ' Cepe ' of the neuter gender ... — 
and at the same time the weepy onion and tearful 
onion-peels in a row. 

'^ aUudes perhaps to Marius' opposition to a corndole in 
119 B.C.— Cichor., 273 (Plut., Mar., 4). 

67 
f2 



LUCILIUS 

217 
Nonius, 201, 8 : ' Ccpa ' feminini ... — 
lippus edenda acri assiduo ceparius cepa. 
Cp. Prise, ap. G.L., II, 203, 15 K. 

218 

C'harisius, ap. O.L. I, lOO, 26 K : ' Intil)a ' . . . masculine 
genere. . . . Lucilius in V deridens rusticam cenam enume- 
ratis multis herbis — 

intubus praeterea pedibus praetensus equinis. 

Cp. Schol., ad Verg., G., I, 120; Non., 209, 2. 

219 

Nonius, 449, 19 : ' Intorfici ' et ' occidi ' et inanimalia veteres 
posse vehementi auctoritate posuerunt . . . Lucilius — 

Durum molle voras, fragmenta interficis panis. 

220 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 94, 16 K : Lucilius V adipatam dicit 
feminino genere, sed ubi iungit pultera — 

adipatam . . . pultem 

221-2 

Nonius, 154, 20 : ' Primitus ' pro primo. ... — 
sicuti cum primos ficos propola recentis 
protulit et pretio ingenti dat primitus paucos. 

Cp. Non., 279, 10. 

21' assidue Prise. cepa lacrimosa cdd. Non. 

^i** praetensus Non. pressus schol. perserpsit cd. 
Charis. praetonsus G. Wagner 
21^ ex libro V ? interficis Bentin. interficit cdd. 
221 primos cdd. 154 i)rimus cdd. 279 

68 



BOOK V 

217 

Nonius : ' Cepa ' of the feminine gender ... — 
an onioner,^ blear-eyed through eating again 
and again the pungent onion. 

218 

Charisius : ' Intiba ' in the masculine. . . . Lucilius in the 
fifth book, deriding a country dinner, after giving a list of 
many potherbs, says — 

moreover endive that is spread out '^ before the 
feet of horses. 

219 

Then comes grain-food : 

Nonius : The old wTiters laid down on strong authority 
that even lifeless things can be ' killed ' and ' slaughtered ' 
. . . Lucilius — 

You gobble up the tit-bit hard and the tit bit 
soft ; you are the death of bits of bread. 

220 

Charisius: Lucilius in book V uses the term ' adipatam,' 
feminine gender, but it is when he adds ' pultem ' — 

larded pottage 
221-2 
Fruits : 

Nonius : ' Primitus ' for ' primo ' . . . — 
as happens when a huckster has laid out for sale 
early figs fresh, and at first offers you only a few at 
a huge price. 

•^ an onion-eater, not an onion-seller. 

'' This probably refers to the condition of the plant when it is 
provided as fodder. 

69 



LUCILIUS 

223 

Servius auctus, ad Verg., 0., I, 266 : ' Fiscina ' genus est 
vasis, id est corbulae brevis quas perferunt qui arbusta 
vindemiant ... — 

fiscina fallaci cumulo 

224-5 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 95, 22 K : ' Haec Qcus ' . . . ' hae 
fici ' . . . Lucilius — 

Fici comeduntur et uvae 



assiduas ficos. 
Cp. id., 128, 31. 

226-7 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 115, 8 K : ' Scutum ' vol ' scuta ' 
. . . Lucilius in V — 

Scutam . . . 
ligneolam in cerebro infixit. 

228-9 

Donatus, ad Ter., Eiin., II, 3, 45 : ' Gemens ' ob continuani 
tussim. sic Lucilius — 

Ante fores autem et triclini limina quidam 
perditus Tiresia tussi grandaevus gemebat. 

230-1 
Nonius, 235, 25 : ' Aequales ' rursuni aequaevi ... — 

Verum unum cecidisse tamen senis Tiresiai 
aequalem constat. 

224-5 trih. lib. V Mr. asse duas D (I.) 
226-7 acutam ligneoleam, e. q. s. fortasse uniiis versus verba 
sinit 
228-9 fj-ii^ iif)^ y j^^ yj ^^yjj-^ ^£ Teiresias, Bentley 

70 



BOOK V 

223 

Servius (supplemented) : ' Fiscina ' is a class of receptacle, 
that is little squat baskets of the sort carried round by those 
who are gathering the grapes from the vineyards ... — 

the rush-basket with its deceptive heap 
224-5 

Oharisius : ' Ficus,' feminine singular; ' fici,' nom. pi. fem. 
. . . Lucilius — 

Figs and grapes are gobbled up 
and 

figs again and again. 

226-7 

An angry guest runs amok and kills an old man : 

Priscianus : ' Scutum ' or ' scuta.' . . . Lucilius in (book) 
V— 

He stuck a little wooden tray in his brain. 

228-9 

Donatus : ' Gemens ' because of constant coughing. Thus 
Lucilius — 

But some Tiresias full of years, a lost soul, was 
groaning with coughs before the door and the 
threshold of the dining-room. 

230-1 
Nonius : ' Aequales ' means also of equal age ... — 
But it is however agreed that one did fall as old as 
Tiresias. 

230 verum Mercier veterum cdd. cecidisse tamen G. 
cecidisset a me rell. cecinisse Francken seni' Tiresiai 

^Ir. sene T., Mercier senem Tiresiam cdd. 



LUCILIUS 

232 

Varro, de L.L., VII, 96 : In pluribus verbis a ante e alii 
ponunt, alii non . . . Lucilius scribit — 

Cecilius pretor ne rusticus fiat. 

Cp. Diomedes, ap. O.L., I, 452, 14 K. 

233-4 

Nonius, 455, 9 : ' Rostrum ' hominis dici non debere con- 
suetudo praesumpsit, set . . . Lucilius — 

Ne designati rostrum praetoris pedesque 
spectes. 

235 

Nonius, 158, 31 : Omnia animalia ' pecudes ' dicuntur 

lascivire pecus Nerei rostrique repandum. 



232 trih. lib. V M, IX L. F. Schmidt, de Lvcil. IX, 8 
pretor onim. cdd. Varr. fias duo cdd. Diomexl. 

235 Aferei Onions niri Lu. \ nisi G. nasi Venator 



" rusticus unexpectedly far urbanus. See next fr. Lucilius 
probably hits at C. Caecilius Metellus Caprarius, son of 
Metellus Macedonicus, an opponent of the poet, and 
pretends that when Caecilius was designated as ' praetor 
urbanus ' men feared that he would turn out to be a ' praetor 
rusticus; ' hence Lucilius uses rustic spellinsr here to re])resent 
a rustic accent (Mueller, Leb. u. Werke des C. Luc. 40., Gichor., 
277-8, Marx, proleg., XLVII). Caecilius was consul in 113. 
Was he the giver of the rustic dimier of lines 213 ff. ? 

72 



BOOK V 
232 

reference to C. Caecilius Metellus Caprarius : 

Varro : In many words some put a before e, some do not 
. . . Lucilius ^^Tites — 

Let's not make Cecilius yokel '^ pretor. 

233-4 

Nonius : Common usage has taken for granted that 
' rostrum ' is a term which ought not to be used of a man, but 
. . . Lucilius in bk. V of the satires has — - 

Gaze you not at the snout ^ and feet of the chosen 
praetor. 

235 
The following also might refer to Caecilius : 
Nonius : ' Pecudes ' is a word used of all animals ... — 
The herd of Nereus, the herd upturned 
Of snout, to folic.*' 

(C) An ideal dinner ^ ? 
Drinking at dinner begins : 

^ slang; allusion to Caecilius' cognomen Caprarius (' be- 
longing to a goat ; ' ' goatherd ') ? 

'' This line probably hits at Pacuvius and certainly describes 
the dolphin, confused, as was usual, with the seal. See 
Pacuvius, ' Teucer,' Remains of Old Latin, II, pp. 292-3 : 
Xerei repandirostrutn incurvicervicum pecus. Lucilius here puts 
rostrique repandum because repandirostrum could not fit into a 
hexameter. Cf. also Livius, Remains, II, pp. 2-3. 

^ The follo-nang seems to be an account of the stratagem 
of Aemilius Paullus against the Ligurians in 180 B.C. (Livy, 
XL, 25-8; Frontinus, III, 17, 2; Cichorius, 272 flf., and Marx, 
comment., 88 ff.), and put by the poet in the form of a dinner 
(contrasted with those just described) at which Aemilius and 
M. Servilius Geminus (' tribunus railitum ' under Paullus 
against the Ligurians — Livy, XL, 27, 4) are the chief diners. 
The exploit of Paullus is related by an officer. 

73 



LUCILIUS 

236 

Nonius, 546, 26 : ' Mixtariuni,' quo misceraus ... — 
urceus haut longe Gemino, mixtarius Paulo. 

237 

Donatus, ad Ter., Andr., Ill, 2, 4 : ' Quod iussi dari bibere 
. . . date.' Consuetudinc quam ratione dixit pro ' date ei 
potionera.' Lucilius in quinto — 

' " Da bibere ab summo.' 

Cp. Porphyr., ad Hor. C, III, 21. 7. 

238 

Nonius, 363, 24 : ' Prodere ' rursus differre vel excludere 

possisne elabi an<^porro)prodenda dies sit." ' 

Cp. Donat., ad Ter., Andr., II, 1, 13 (. . . porro pro- 
denda . . .). 

239 

Nonius, 392, 1 : ' Stat ' etiani plenum est ... — 

' Interea stat sentibus pectus.' 
Cp. Cell., VIII, 5. 

240 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., X, 398 : Alii dolorem alicuius 
studii ardorem et promptam gloriae cupiditatem veterum 
more dictum volunt . . . Lucilius in V — 

* nam omnibus unus dolor <tali) re captus labosque.* 

23® haut L aut cdd. vocabula longe . . . paulo valgo 
corrupta habentur 

240 tali W turpi M 

" in which wine and water were to be mixed. 

* Livy, XL, 27, 1 ; Cichor., 275. 

'' Frontin., I.e.; Cichor., I.e. cp. Livy, XL, 27, 10-15. 

74 



BOOK V 

236 
Nonius : ' ]\Iixtarium,' in which we mix ... — 

a water-pot close by for Geminus, a mixing-vessel ° 
for Paullus, 

237 

Donatus : ' What I ordered to be given to drink, give her.' 
He said this by common usage rather than in reasoned diction, 
for ' give her a drink.' Lucilius in the fifth (book) — 

' Give them to drink beginning from the couch- 
head.' 

238 
One of the diners begins to tell of the great exploit of Aemilius. 
Aemilius waits in his camp * as though in fear ; officer speaks : 
Nonius : ' Prodere ' means also to put ofE or to exchide ... — 

' " whether you could slip away, or whether the 
day of action must be put off to the future." ' 

239 
Aemilius is worried : 
Nonius : ' Stat ' even means is full ... — 

' Meanwhile his thoughts are a standing mass of 
thorns.' 

240 
Impatience of the soldiers : 

Servius (supplemented), on ' dolor ' in Virgil : Some would 
have it that a ' dolor,' an ache, is a term used in the manner 
of the old writers for the heat of some enthusiasm and a ready 
lust for glory. . . . Lucilius has in the fifth book — 

' for at such a turn one ache, one worry, was caught 
by all.' '^ 

75 



LUCILIUS 
241-2 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 470, 6 K : * Nexi ' . . . — 
' Hie solus vigilavit, opinor, 
et cum id mi visus facere est, turn retia nexit.' 
Cp. Diomedes, ap. G,L., I, 369, 24 K. 

243 

Nonius, 552, 8 : ' Catapulta ' iaculum . . . vel sagitta 

' custodem classis catapultas pila sarisas ' 

244 
Nonius, 261, 3 : ' Cernere ' rursum disponcrc ... — 
" postquam praesidium castris educere crevi," ' 

245 
Nonius, 341, 35 : ' Mactare ' est magis augere ... — 
* '* Macte, inquam, virtute simulque his versibus 
esto." ' 
Cp. Serv. auct., ad .4ew., IX, 641. 

246 

Maerobius, S., VI, 1, 35: ' Dicite Pierides ; non omnia 
possumus oranes ' (Verg., Ed., VIII, 63). Lucilius in V — 

' Maior erat natu ; non omnia possumus omnes.' 

247-8 

Nonius, 515, 2 : ' Minutim ' pro minute ... — 

Die quaenam eogat vis ire minutim 
per eommissuras rimarum noetis nigrore. 

**3 pila L tela Roth catapulta stila cdd. 
-'•* crevi ed. ann. 1476 decrevi(t) cdd. 
2^5 his iServ. hie Non. versibus Non. viribus 

Serv., rede ? 

2*' quaenam Mr. quam cdd. 

76 



BOOK V 

241-2 
But Aemilius had a plan : 
Priscianus : ' Nexi ' as a perfect ... — 

* he alone, I think was wide awake, and while he 
seemed to me to be doing this (i.e. hesitating), he 
also strung nets.' 

243 
and C. Matienus, duumvir of the fleet, was to help : 
Nonius : ' Catapulta,' a spear ... or arrow ... — 
'the chief of the fleet, bolts for catapults, jave- 
lins, spears ' 

244 
Aemilhis decides to move : 

Nonius : ' Cernere ' also means to arrange ... — 
' " after I decided to lead the garrison out of the 
camp," ' 

245 
Praise for Aemilius — and Lucilius " .* 
Nonius : ' Mactare ' is to make grow more ... — 
' " Bravo," say I " for your valour and for these 
your verses too." ' 

246 
Macrobius, on ' Tell, you daughters of Pierus ; not all things 
can we all do,' in Virgil : Lucilius in book V — 

* He was older in vears ; not all things can we all 
do.' 

247-8 
The following fragments of bk. V may belong to a third satire. 
Nonius : ' Minutim ' instead of ' minute ' . . . — 
Tell me please what things force could squeeze 
bit by bit through seamy cracks in the black of night. 
" But perhaps viribus, ' forces,' is right in line 245. 

77 



LUCILIUS 

249-50 

Nonius, 133, 11 : ' Lupari ' ut scortari vel prostitui ... — 
<( Absterge laerimas) et divos ture precemur 
consilium fassi, placeatne impune luperis, 

Cp. Schol. Veron., ad Aen., VII, 106 (absterge . . . prece- 
mur). 

251 
Festus, 180, 5 : — 

Non omnibus dormio 

proverbiura videtur natum a Cipio quodara, qui Pararhenchon 
dictus est, quod simularet dormientem, quo impunitius uxor 
eius moecharetur : eius meminit Lucilius. 



LIBER VI 

This book, written probably about 115 B.C., contained, 
it seems, at least two satires. One of them has been taken 
(Fiske, Lucilius and Horace, 330 fif.), rightly I think, as the 

Sat. I. 
252-3 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 5, 87 : ' Oppidulo quod versu 
dicere non est.' Aequum Tuticum significat . . . Hoc autem 
sub exemplo Lucili posuit; nam ille in sexto Saturarum sic 
ait — 

Servorum est festus dies hie 
quern plane hexametro versu non dicere possis. 

2** absterge laerimas o?». Non. ; add. ex schol. 
2^" placeatne Mr. placeat S placent tune cdd. 
fortasse Placent ! Tu luperis S superbis cdd. 



" An obscure fragment; but see the passage from Festus 
which is given next. 

78 



BOOK VI 
249-50 

Nonius : ' Lupari ' (to go whoring) is used like ' scortari ' 
or ' prostitui ' . . . — 

Wipe away your tears, and having confessed our 
purpose, let us offer prayer to the gods with incense, 
to know if they will let you go and whore un- 
punished." 

251 
Festus : — 

I am not asleep for all ^ 

is a proverb which seems to have arisen from a certain 
Cipius, who was called Pararhenchon (Alongside-snorer) for 
the reason that he pretended to be asleep in order that his 
wife might commit adultery with more impunity. Lucilius 
mentions it. 

BOOK VI 

model of Horace's satire about the bore (Hor, S.,1,9). Another 
is concerned with politics, the prodigal nobility, and the 
genteel poor of Rome. 

Sat. I. Scipio Aemilianns encounters a boring buffoon. 

252-3 

The occasion : birthday of Servius Tullius {Ides of August) : 

Porphyrio on ' A little town which we cannot name in a 
hexameter.' He means Equus Tuticus; and he put this 
after the example of Lucihus, for the latter in the sixth book 
of the Satires has these words — 

This is that slaves' holiday which you could not 
name completely in a hexameter line.*^ 

* Cp. Cic, ad Fam., VII, 24, 1 ; ad Att.,Xlll, 49, 2. 

<^ Scaliger thinks the poet meant the Sigillaria. But Van 
Heusde {Stud. Crit. in Luc, 143-4, cp. Marx, comment., 92, 
Cichor., 286-7) decides for the name of a festival in honour 
of the birth of Servius Tullius; he adduces Test., 343, 7 (cp. 
Plut., Quaest.R&m., 100). 2^i<^i^^non — 'you simply couldn't' (?) 

79 



LUCILIUS 

Arnobius, Adv. Gentes, V, 18 : Ocrisiam prudentissimam 
feminam divos inseruisse genitali, explicuisse motus certos; 
turn sancta cfferventia numina vim vomuisse ^ Lucilii ac regera 
fServium natum esse Romanum {sc. taccamus). 

254-8 

Festus, 418, 17 : ' Scurrae ' vocabulum Verrius ineptissime 
aut ex Graeco tractum ait . . . aut a sequendo; cui magis 
adsentitur, quod et tenuioris fortunae homines et ceteri 
alioqui, qui honoris gratia perscqucrcntur quempiam, non 
antecedere sed sequi sint soliti, quia videlicet dicat Lucilius — 

Cornelius Publius noster 
Scipiadas t dicto tempus f quae intorquet in ipsum 
t oti et delici<(i)s luci effictae f atque cinaedo et 
sectatori f adeo ipsi f suo, quo rectius dicas. 
Ibat forte domum. Sequimur niulti atque fre- 
quent es ; 

cum secutos videri velit, ob eorum iurgia, non ob adsuetum 
officium. 

259 

Xonius, 136, 27 : ' MaceUum ' dictum pro macilentum 
Lucilius probat lib. VI — 

Si nosti, non magnus homo est, nasutus macellus. 

260 
Nonius, 159, 38 : ' Porcet ' significat prohibet ... — 

" Non te porro procedere porcent." 

^ forfasse latet Lucilii versus : tum sancta efferventia 
numina vim vomuere trib. lib. VI C, 286-7 
254-8 locus desperatus. trib. lib. VI Fiske 331-2 
255 in tempus quae latet puto vocab. scurra. fortasse 
dicta . . . scurrae quae i. 

" Perhaps Lucilius wrote ' turn . . . vomuere.^ But even 
so it is not known in what book the words should be placed. 

** Although nearly the whole passage, as it appears in the 
text of Festus, scans correcth% it must be hopelessly corrupt ; 
and all efforts to make sense of it fail. For Scii)iadas, cp. 

So 



BOOK VI 

Origin of the festival ? : 

Arnobius : Ocrisia, a most discreet woman, slipped gods into 
her womb, set forth certain movements ; then " the holy 
deities, boOing over, vomited the essence of Lucihus and the 
Roman king Servius Tullius was born. Cp. line 1271 ? 

254-8 

Scipio going home meets a bore or buffoon : 

Festus : The word ' scurra ' (dandy, or buflFoon) Verrius 
most stupidly says is derived either from the Greek ... or 
from ' sequor ; ' wdth him agreement is all the more usual 
because both people of slenderer fortune, and the rest besides 
who followed anyone about to do him honour, were wont not 
to go in front but to follow, which is clear, they say, in view 
of Lucihus' words — 

Our Publius Cornelius son o' Scipio's house . . .^ 

his male lover — or rather his 

follower (to name him more accurately). He was 
as it happened going home. We followed, numbers 
and crowds of us ; 

whereas he wants them to appear as having followed because 
of their insults, not because of a customary duty. 

259 

The bore : 

Nonius : That ' macellus ' was a word used for ' macilentus ' 
(rather lean) is proved by Lucihus in the sixth book — 

If you know him, he's not a big fellow, rather lean ; 
has a big nose. 

260 

Xonius : ' Porcet ' means prevents ... — 

" They (i.e. Scipio's suite?) are not stopping you 
from footing it farther." 

Explan. in Donat., ap. G.L,, IV, 527 10 K : ut Miltiades 
Asclepiades ila Luciliades et Memmiades Scipiades. Verrius' 
derivation of ' scurra ' from ' sequor ' was not unreasonable. 

8i 

VOL. III. G 



LUCILIUS 

261 

Nonius, 324, 4 : ' lubere ' est velle ... — 
" Salvere iubere salutem est mittere amico." 

262-3 

Nonius, 362, 13 : ' Protelare ' rursus adiuvare . . . Lu- 
cilius satyrarum lib. VI — 

quern neque Lucanis oriimdi montibus tauri 
ducere protelo validis cervicibus possent. 

264 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., I, 76 : ' Optare ' non tantum 
eligere significat , . . sed etiam velle ... — 

"... quid ipsum me facere optes." 

265 
Nonius, 497, 36 : Genetivus positus pro ablativo ... — 
" Hortare, illorum si possim pacis potiri," 

266 
Nonius, 500, 18 : Ablativus pro gcnetivo ... — 
Id solum adversae fortunae reque resistit. 

267-8 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 9, 78 : ' Sic me servavit Apollo ' 
. . . hoc illo sensu Homerico sumpsit, quern et Lucilius in 
sexto satyrarum repraesentavit sic dicens — 

nil ut discrepet ac tov 8' €^>)p7ra^€v 'AttoA-Xoov 
fiat. 

2«^ quid ipsum me IMr. ipsum quid L quid<liic> 
ipsum M quid ipsum facere Serv. 

^^^ pacis L captus S potiri D (I.) capisotiri vel 
capi sortiri cdd. 

2^^ et id cdd. seclud. et Linds. 

2G^ nil add. M Cf. Horn., 11., XX, 443 

82 



BOOK VI 

261 

Nonius : ' lubere ' means to wish ... — 

" To send welcome to a friend is to wish him well." 

262-3 
Nonius : * Protelare ' (really ' to drive forward ') means 
also to give help . . . Lucilius in bk. VI of the Satires uses 
' protelum ' (a driven team or Hne) — 

whom neither bulls bred in the Lucanian moun- 
tains could draw away in a driven team on their 
sturdy necks. 

264 

Servius (supplemented) : ' Optare ' does not mean simply 
to choose . . . but even to want ... — 

"... what you may want me myself to do." 

265 
Nonius : The genitive put for the ablative ... — 
" You encourage me, if I can gain the good will 
of yonder men," 

266 
.4 last resort saves Scipio : 

Nonius : The ablative form put for the genitive "... — 
That alone is left of his bad luck in this bad 
business. 

267-8 

Porphjo-io, on ' Thus did ApoUo preserve me ' in Horace : 
He took this in that well known meaning found in Homer; 
which Lucilius also has set forth in the sixth book of the 
Satires, when he says as follows — 

so that it may be all the same and become a case 
of ' and him Apollo rescued.' 

" But re is more probably a dative — " This alone resists 
bad luck and a bad business." 

83 
g2 



LUCILIUS 

Saf. IT. 
269 

Nonius, 159, 36 : ' Prodigitas ' dicta profusio ... — 
" Nequitia occupat hos petulantia prodigitasque." 

270-1 
Nonius, 111, 21 : ' Facul ' pro faciliter ... — 

** Peccare impune rati sunt 
posse et nobilitate facul propellere iniquos." 



272 

Nonius, 125, 9 : ' Innubere ' positum transire, quod hae 
quae niibunt ad domos maritorum transeunt ... — 

" in suam enim hos invadere rem atque innubere 
censent." 

273-4 

Nonius, 21, 18 : ' Quiritare ' est clamare ; tractum ab is qui 
Quirites invoeant ... — 

" Haec inquam rudet ex rostris atque heiulitabit 
concursans veluti Ancarius clareque quiritans." 

Cp. Varro, L.L., VII, 103. 

269 hos D (I.) hoc cdd. 

2'i nobilitate cdd. cp. //, C. Q., I, 57 nobilitati 

{(jeneliv.) M 

2 '2 in . . . hos . . . rem suppl. C, 286 suam enim in- 
vadere atque innubere cdd. insinuare L suam enim 
<rem> invadere <se> M 

2'* angarius S {recte /) 



84 



BOOK VI 

Sat. TI. Roman 'politics, procligalit;/, and genteel poverty. 

269 
A democratic politician speaks against the nobles : 
Nonius : ' Prodigitas ' is a term used for prodigality . , . — 
" Wickedness and wantonness and prodigality 
takes hold of these men." 

270-1 
Nonius : ' Facul ' for ' faciliter ' . . . — 
" They thought they could sin unpunished and that 
it was easy to repulse their enemies by virtue of 
their high birth." 

272 

Nonius : ' Innubere ' was put for to pass across, because 
women who marry pass over to the houses of their 
husbands ... — 

" For they {the nobles) look upon them {the common 
folk) as attacking their property and passing into 
it by marriage." " 

273-4 

one of the ' nobles ' speaks : 

Nonius : ' Quiritare ' means to shout ; it is derived from 
those who call upon the Quirites ... — 

" All this, I say, will he roar and yell from the 
platform, running to and fro like Ancarius and 
hallooing loudly." ^ 

" So Cichorius, 285-6. Nonius seems to have mistaken 
the meaning of innubere. 

^ Someone perhaps compares a democrat (C. Memmius?) 
with a forbear of Q. Ancharius a senator who was killed in 87, 
(Appian, B.C., I, 73 ?) or with C. Gracchus (Plut., Tib. Gracch. 
2, 2) — Cichor., 282 flf. But Scaliger's proposal angarius 
{dyyapos), an express messenger, may be right. 

85 



LUCILIUS 

275-6 

Nonius, 68, 20 : ' Abstemius ' . . . — 

*' Chauno meno " inquit balba, sororem 
lanificam dici siccam atque abstemiam ubi audit. 

277 

Nonius, 540, 26 : ' Amphitapoe ' vestes dicuntur utrimque 
habentes villos ... — 

pluma atque amphitapoe et si aliud quid deliciarum. 

278-81 

Nonius, 78, 2 : ' Bulga ' est sacculus ad bracchium pen- 
dens ... — 

Cui neque iumentum est nee servus nee comes uUus, 
bulgam et quidquid habet nummorum secum habet 

ipse; 
cum bulga cenat dormit lavit ; omnis in una est 
res homini bulga ; bulga haec devincta lacerto est. 

282 

Nonius, 189, 24 : ' Zonatim,' per goerum ... — 

Zonatim circum impluvium cinerarius . . . 
cludebat. 

2'^ chauno meno M davju-a fxey' Mr. Oavfia fiev L 

Oavfiaivco Haupt x^^^^^t^^^V Mercier thaunumeno 

Lu. thaunomeno G. fortasse thanum (= sanum) 

omen id vel rpavXx] fidfo) 

280-1 omnis in unast res (spes alii) homini bulga L 
omnia in una sunt M omnis in una seti hominibus bulga 
haec cdd. lacerto Duebner certo cdd. 

2^2 per zonatim cdd. seclud. per edd. cinerarius Lips 

c. <aeger> M cini' raru' fluebat Mr. alii alia 

86 



BOOK VI 

275-6 

Wantonness of women : 

Nonius : ' Abstemius ' . . . — 

" I'll thtay open " " said she with a lisp, when she 
heard that her sister was said to be a spinster of 
wool, and to be sober and temperate. 

277 
The rich : 

Nonius : ' Ampliitapoe ' is the name given to coverings 
having nap-tufts on both sides ... — 

feather-do^vn and double-napped coverlets and 
every other choice luxury there is. 

278-81 
The genteel poor ? : 

Nonius : ' Bulga ' (bag, knapsack) is a little satchel hanging 
to the arm ... — 

He who has no beast, slave, or any companion, 
actually keeps with him his wallet, and whatever 
coins he has; he dines, sleeps, washes in company 
with his wallet ; all the man's property is in the one 
wallet alone ; this wallet hangs tied to his upper arm. 

282 
Their mean house : 

Nonius : ' Zonatim,' in circles ... — 
The hair-curler limped girdle-like round the rain- 
basin.^ 

" if chauno nieno (xo-vvois) fj-evco or /Mevco), as Marx reads, is 
right, then it must be in two senses, one of them obscene; 
so also perhaps ' siccam,' dry. 

^ in the atrium ; or the word may mean here the central 
space in the atrium ; it also can denote the skylight above. 

87 



LUCILIUS 

283 
Nonius, 212, 7 : ' Latrinas ' . . . neutro ... — 
Hie tu apte credis quemquam latrina petisse ? 

284 

Nonius, 181, 22 : ' Tenta ' dictum pro ' extensa ' . . . — 
tres a Deucalione grabati restibus tenti. 

285-6 

Nonius, 281, 14 : ' Dominus ' rursum appellatur convivii 
exhibitor ; unde et * doniinia' convivia ... — 

" Qui te dominum fortem bonus luppiter — ," inquit 
Crasso Mucius cum cenabat. 

287-8 

Porphyrio ad Hor., S., I, 3, 1 : Lucilius ' Sardiniensem ' 
dixit in sexto satyrarum sic — 

e Sicula Lucilius Sardiniensem 
terram. 

289 

Nonius, 137, 21 : ' iMusimones ' asini rauli aut equi 
breves ... — 

Praedium emit qui vendit equum musimonem. 

283 hoc cdd. hac tu ab re Mr. 

2 85-6 qyj ^g bonus luppiter inquit crasso mucium cum 
cenabat dominum fortem Non. dominum fortem trans- 
posui cum cena dominum improbe M cum quo cenabat 
dominum ornet L dominum male fortem Leo, G.G.A., 
1906, (i), 847 

28* praedium D (F.) emit pretio L pretium redimet 
M praetium emit cdd. huius emit pretium olim M 

88 



BOOK VI 

283 
Nonius : ' Latrinae ' ... in the neuter ... — 
Would you reasonably believe that anyone here 
has made for the baths ? " 

284 
Nonius : ' Tenta ' is a term used for ' extensa ' . . . — 
three camp-beds, dating from the Flood, and 
stretched on cords. 

285-6 

Unplaced fragments : JIucius Scaevola to his son-in-law : 

Nonius : ' Dominus ' (master) again is the name applied 
to the giver of a banquet ; whence also ' dominia ' means 
banquets ... — 

" And may good Jupiter," said Mucins to Crassus, 
when he was dining, " — you, my brave master! " 

287-8 

Lucilius refers to his Sicilian and Sardinian estates ? : * 

Porphyrio : Lucilius used the form ' Sardiniensis ' in the 
sixth book of the Satires, thus — 

Lucilius . . . from the Sicilian to the Sardinian land. 

289 
Nonius : ' Musimones,' small asses, mules or horses ... — 
He who sells a horse, a pony,^ buys an estate. 

" or, ' privies.' 

* Cichorius, 28-9. 

<^ Nonius takes musimonem here as an epithet ; but he may 
be wrong, because musimo was also used, as a noun, of the 
moufflon, found in Corsica, Sardinia, Spain, N. Africa, and 
Cyprus. 

89 



LUCILIUS 
LIBER VII 

Sat. I. 
290 

Nonius, 351, 20 : ' Nobilis ' dicitur et notus. . . . Lucilius 
Satyrarum lib. VII — 

Phryne nobilis ilia iibi amatorem inprobius quem 

291 

Nonius, 23, 1 : ' Sagae ' mulicres dicuntur feminae ad 
lubidinem virorum indagatrices ... — 

aetatem et faciem ut saga et bona conciliatrix. 

292-5 

Gellius, IX, 14, 21-2 : In casu . . . dandi, qui purissime 
locutisunt, non ' faciei ' uti nunc dicitur, sed ' facie ' dixerunt. 
Lucilius in Saturis — 

prinium facie quod honestae 
aetas accedit. 

Lucilius in libro septimo — 
" Qui te diligat, aetatis facieque tuae se 
fautorem ostendat, fore amicum poUiceatur." 

Sunt tamen non pauci qui utrobique ' facii ' legant. 

296-7 
Nonius, 95, 10 : ' Desquamat ' squamis expoliat ... — 
** rador subvellor desquamor pumicor ornor 
expolior pingor." 

2^3 aetas W aetati Mr. et annis B honeste 

tantis cdd. trib. lib. VII Mr. 

28' expolior pingor D (F.) expilor expingor vel exque 
pilor pingor coni. M expilor et pingor Guietus expilor 
pingor aid. 

90 



BOOK VII 
BOOK VII ° 

Sat. I. Le-'isons in sexual vuitter^-. 

290 

A notorious whore : 

Nonius : ' Nobilis ' is a term used also for ' notus.' 
Lucilius in the seventh book of the Satires — 

When that notorious Phryne villainously . . . 
some lover 

291 

Xonius : ' Sagae,' as applied to women, is a term for those 
who explore after the lust of men ... — 

in youth and looks, like a bawd and a rare pro- 
curess. 

292-5 

Gellius : In the dative case those whose diction was the 
purest used not the form ' faciei,' which is now used, but 
' facie.' Lucilius in the Satires — 

first because to her good looks there is added 
youth. 

Gellius continues : Lucilius in the seventh book — 

" He who loves you, and reveals that he is taken 

by your youth and looks, and promises to be your 

friend." 

But there are not a few who read in both instances ' facii.' 

296-7 

Nonius : ' Desquamat,' deprives of scales ... — 
"I'm being scraped, underplucked, scaled, rubbed, 
adorned, polished and painted." 

* There were probably two satires at least in this book, 
one upon matters of physical love, and another of uncertain 
bearing but perhaps deahng with hfe's changes of fortune. 
The order is indicated by Nonius, 21, 24; 21, 31; 22, 3. 

91 



LUCILIUS 

298 

Nonius, 21, 24 : ' Caries ' est vetustas vel putrilago ... — 
" ne auriculam obsidat caries, ne vermiculi qui." 

299 

Nonius, 215, 3 : * Nasus ' . . . neutri ... — 
" quels oculi non sunt neque nasum et qualia sanis." 

300 

Nonius, 450, 9 : Etiam humanam vocem nonnulli ' gan- 
nitum ' vocaverunt ... — 

" Eodem pacto gannis." 

301 

Nonius, 169, 34 : ' Simat ' . . . — 
si movet ac simat nares, delphinus ut olim. 

302 

Nonius, 19, 20 : ' Evannctur ' dictum est ventiletur vel 
moveatur, a vannu in qua legumina ventilantur. Pomponius 
e. q. s. . . . Lucilius satyrarum lib. VII — 

hunc molere, illani autem ut frumentum vannere 
lumbis. 

298 vermiculi qui L vermiculique cdd. 

299 queis(Iun.) . . . sanis Mr. quoi si . . . nasum est, 
qualia sent it ? L quos . . . et qualia sunt cdd. qualia 
alis sunt roni. Linds. 

3°" pacto oggannis D {¥.) fortasse rede pacto li oganni ! 
Mr. pactologannis cdd. 

3"^ sic Mr. fortasse is ac simat Roth aximad cdd. 

92 



BOOK VII 
298 

Nonius : ' Caries ' (decay) means oldness or rottenness 

" lest a gathering, lest certain little worms block 
up your tiny ear." " 

299 
Nonius : ' Nasus ' ... of the neuter gender ... — 
** those who have no eyes or nose and what the 
sound in body have." 

300 

The following also perhaps belong to this theme : 

Nonius : Some writers used ' yelping ' even of the human 
voice ... — 

In the same way you yelp." 
301 

Nonius : ' Simat ' . . , — ■ 

if he sets his nostrils a-quivering and snubs them 
flat as at times a dolphin.^ 

302 

An unfaithful wife ? : 

Nonius : ' Evannetur ' (will be winnowed out) was used 
for 'fanned' or 'moved,' from ' vannus ' (winnowing -fan), 
in which pulse-plants *" are tossed about. Pomponius e.q.s. 
. . . Lucilius in bk. VII of the Satires has ' vannere ' — 

that he grinds, but she winnows out as it were 
corn with her loins. 

" auricula is properly the ear-lap, the outside ear. 
* Suss, H., LXII, 354. 

" legumina. But Nonius by this word means cereals. 
The future evannetur in Pomp, he takes as a wish. 

93 



LUCILIUS 

303-5 

Nonius, 398, 31 : ' Samium ' rursum acutum ; unde et 
samiare dicimus acuerc, quod in Samo hoc genus artis pol- 
leat ... — 

Hanc ubi vult male habere, ulcisci pro scelere eius, 
testam sumit homo Samiam sibi ; "aim noceo," 

inquit, 
praeceidit caulem testisque una amputat ambo. 

Cp. GeU., IV, 16, 6. 

306-7 

Nonius, 21, 31 : ' Virosae ' mulieres dicuntur virorum ad- 
petentes vel luxuriosae ... — 

Dixl. Ad principium venio : vetulam atque virosam 
iixorem caedam potius quam castrem egomet me. 

308-9 

Apuleius, ApoL, 10 : Improbarira (sc. Lucil.) quod Gen- 
tium et Macedonem pueios directis nominibus carmine suo 
prostituerit. 

Donatus, ad Ter., Andr., V, 6, 12 (976) : 'Tuus est nunc 
Chremes.' Lucilius in \'II — 

Nunc praetor tuus est ; meus, si discesserit horno 
Gentius. 

310 

Nonius, 110, 11 : ' Flaccet,' languet, deficit ... — 
Hie est Macedo, si f Agrion f longius flaccet. 

304 sibi L tibi B ibi cdd. 
30® discesserit Cich. decesserit Mr. 
30^ Gentius vulg. gentili cdd. 

310 <ccce>hic Terzaghi agrion cdd. rede ' dxpelov 
L eugion Quich. Gentio' ]\lr. 

94 



BOOK VII 

303-5 

Revenge of the husband : 

Nonius : ' Samiura ' also means sharpened, whence we 
use also ' samiare ' " as a term for to sharpen on the ground 
that skill of this kind flourishes in Samos ... — 

When the man wants to spite this woman and wants 
to have vengeance for her wickedness, he takes to 
himself a Samian sherd ;^ "its the old woman I 
hurt," says he, and cuts off the stalk and lops off 
both cods at once. 

306-7 

Someone protests at this : 

Nonius : ' Virosae,' as applied to women, is a term for 
luxurious women or women who long for men ... — 

I've said enough. To come to the main point: 
I would rather cut off my wretched old man-mad 
wife than geld myself. 

308-9 

On Gentius and Macedo : 

Apuleius : I must disapprove of Lueilius for sullying in 
his poetry the boys Gentius and Macedo pointedly under 
their own names. 

Donatus, on ' Chremes is yours now ' in Terence : Lucihus 
in the seventh book — 

Now the praetor is yours ; but mine will he be if 
Gentius leaves this year. 

310 
Nonius : ' Flaccet,' is faint, weakened ... — 
There is Macedo here if Agrion(?) droops any 
longer. 

** samiare, to pohsh with Samian stone; cf. next note. 

* not real ' Samian ware ' but stone polished up in the 
Samian manner. Lueilius makes a pun on testa and testis. 
We might say ' sherd . . . and sherds ofE . . .' 

95 



LUCILIUS 

311-2 

Nonius, 258, 38 : ' Contendere ' significat comparare . . . — 

Huncin ego umquam Hyacintho hominem cortinipo- 

t cutis 
deliciis contend! ? 

Sat. 11. 

313 

Nonius, 496, 15 : Genetivus casus positus pro 
accusativo ... — 

Tristes difficiles sumus, fastidimus bonorum. 

314 
Nonius, 139, 4 : ' Muginari,' murmurare ... — 
Muginamur molimur subducimur. 
Cp. Non., 346, 16. 

315-6 

Nonius, 200, 16 : ' Collus ' niasculino ... — 

calda simeitu 
ac bene plena ei vasa olerorum atque anseris collus. 



317 

Nonius, 395, 11 : ' Segetem ' etiam ipsam terrani dicimus 
. . . (395, 28)— 

solem auram adversam segetem immutasse satumque. 

316-6 calda simeitu ac bene plena ei vasa olerum Mr. (vasa 
olerum Koch) splenia olorum 31 S Seal. calda siem ac 
bene plena si olorum M caldais seme (caldissime G. 
calda insemul vel insemel coni. Linds.) ac bene plena iiasolorum 
cdd. 

31' solem cdd. (solam G. rede ?) satumque D (I.) 

statumque cdd. 

96 



BOOK VII 

311-2 
Nonius : ' Contendere ' means to compare ... — 
Have I ever compared this fellow to Hyacinthus. 
the darling of the Tripodipotent ? " 

Sat. II. Human ^vi<ihe.s and fate's decisions ? 

313 

Man's discontent : 

Nonius : The genitive case put for the accusative ... — 
We are glum and hard to please ; we are dis- 
dainful of our good things. 

314 
Nonius : ' Muginari,' to grumble ... — 
We hum and ha,^ we plan mightily, we are dragged 
under. '^ 

315-6 
Nonius : ' Collus ' in the mascuHne ... — 
for him at the same time a fine full hot-pot of 
vegetables ^ and a goose's neck. 

317 

The farmer's troubles ? : 
Nonius : ' Seges ' is a term which we apply even to the 
ground itself ... — 

that the sun and an unfavourable wind wrought 
a change in the cornfield and its sown crop. 

" Apollo ' strong i' the tripod.' 

* or dally. 

"^ or, we shirk, ' take French leave.' 

** Butthecorrupttext may hide o/or«im (swans; not smells?). 

97 

VOL. III. H 



LUCILIUS 

318 
Nonius, 506, 7 : ' Fulgit ' pro fulget ... — 
Priiniim fuloit uti calduin v furii;ici})us ferrum. 

319 
Nonius, 102, 19 : ' Exculpere ' est extorquere ... — 
esuriente leoni ex ore exculpere praedam, 

320 
Nonius, 457, 71 : ' Catuli ' . . . — 

<(leae i)ratae ad catulos aecedere inultum. 

321-2 

Nonius, 22, 3 : ' Capronae ' dicuntur comae quae ante 
frontem sunt ... — 

iactari caput atque comas fluitare capronas 
altas frontibus immissas ut mos fuit illis. 

Cp. Paul, ex Fest., 33, 32 (capronae equorum iubae . . .); 
C. Gl.L., IV, 29, 49. 

323 

Nonius, 552, 30 : ' Rorarii ' appellabantur milites qui 
. . . primo . . . inibant proelium ... — 

quinque hastae, aureolo cinctu rorarius veles. 

^^^ \'1I esuriente Usener, IMr. II II L uti esurienti 
cdd. 

320 iratae Quich. <utque leae i>ratae M ferai vel 
pantherai Mr iratae <tigris>o/m Leo qui postea iratae 

leae iratae <que ursae> C rete D (I.) rate cdd. 

98 



BOOK VII 

318 

Nonius : ' Fulgit ' for ' fulget ' . . . — 

First it glares like hot iron from the furnaces. 

319 

Rosh desires or actions : 

Nonius : ' Exculpere ' (chisel out, wrench from) means to 
twist out ... — 

to wrench from a lion's hungry mouth its prey, 

320 
Nonius : ' Catuli ' . . . — 

to approach unharmed the cubs of an angry 
lioness. 

321-2 
Spanish affairs ? : The Lusitanians ? : " 

Nonius : ' Capronae ' (forelocks) is a term applied to the 
hair which is in front of the forehead ... — 

that their head was tossed about, their forelocks 
floated about on high, let loose upon their foreheads, 
as was their manner. 

323 

reward to soldiers in Spain ? : 

Nonius : ' Rorarii ' was a name given to soldiers who . . . 
joined battle first ... — 

. . . five lances, the light-armed and sldrmishers 
with a little golden circlet.^ 

" Cp. Appian, Iher., 67. Lucilius may refer to PopiUius' 
campaign of 139 (Cichor., 32-3); but might he not refer to 
a fine horse (Fiske, 26) ? 

* The clause quinque hastae is incomplete. The fragment 
refers to military rewards. Marx, ad 290. 

99 
h2 



LUCILIUS 
LIBER VIII 

Sat. I. 

324-5 

Nonius, 489, 22 : ' Gracila est ' pro gracilis est, Lucilius 
satyrarum lib. VIII — 

quod gracila est, pernix, quod pectore puro, 
quod puero similis. 

326 
Nonius, 217, 12 : ' Posticam ' . . . neutro ... — 
Pistrinum adpositum posticum cella culina. 

327-7« 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 115, 15 K : ' Panus.' . . . Lucilius 
in VIII— 

<(fusus) 

intus modo stet rectus, foris subteminis panus. 

Cp. Non., 149, 19; Charis., ap. G.L., I, 105, 18 K : VII, 
285, 20. 

328-9 

Nonius, 427, 22 : ' Priores ' et ' primorcs ' . . . — 

gallinaceus cum victor se gallus honeste 

in tentos digitos primoresque erigit ungues. 

324 et L 

326 ceUa Gulielmus sella cdd. 

327 fusus add. W subterainus Flor. 3 Nmi. substeminis 
G. No7i. substeminiis Lti. Non. 

329 in tentos H altius in M homeste intulit is L h. i. 
in Quich. honeste sustulit in Aid. onesteratelitus cdd. 

ICO 



BOOK VIII 

BOOK VIII « 

Sat. I. On women and me?i's relations with them 
324-5 

The best woman for a man ? 

Nonius : ' Gracila est ' for ' gracilis est.' Lucilius in the 
eighth book of the Satires — 

because she is slender and nimble, because she 
has a pure heart, because she looks like a boy. 

326 

A simple house : 

Nonius : ' Postica ' ... in the neuter gender ... — • 
Built on to it is a pounding-mill, a backhouse, a 
store-room, and a kitchen. 

327-7« 
The good wife^s work : 

Priseianus : ' Panus ' . . . Lucilius in book VIII — 
provided that, inside, the spindle stands upright 
and, outside,^ a bobbin-full of weft. 

328-9 
Her pride ? : 

Nonius : ' Priores ' and ' primores ' . . . — 
when a poultry-cock, winner in a good fight, 

raises itself on its toes at full stretch and on its front 

claws. 

" This book certainly dealt with matters of sex, and probably 
with trades which ministered to table-luxury. 
* that is, all round, covering the spindle. 



LUCILIUS 

330 

Priscianus ap. G.L., II, 397, 24 K : A ' lenteo ' ' lentesco ' 
dcrivatur, quoniodo a ' duro ' ' duresco ' et a ' vireo ' ' viresco.' 
Lucilius in VIII — 

lentet opus. 

Cp. Macrob., ap. G.L., V, 650, 31 K. 

331-2 

Nonius, 257, 37 : ' Conponere,' coniungere ... — 
" cum poclo bibo eodem, amplector, labra labellis 
fictricis conpono, hoc est cum fixiXoKoirovixai." 

Cp. Xon., 308, 22. 

333 

Nonius, 257, 37 : ' Conponere,' coniungere ... — 
" Turn latus conponit lateri et cum pectore pectus." 

334 
Porphyrio ad Hor., S., I, 2, 125 : Lucilius ait in VIII — 
" . . . et cruribus crura diallaxon," 



335 

Porphyrio ad Hor., *Sf., I, 2, 68 : ' Muttonem ' pro virili 
membro dixit Lucilium imitatus; ille etenim in VIII sic ait — 

" at laeva lacrimas muttoni absterget amica." 

332 tlswXoKOTToviiai lunlus recte\ cf. Cronert, Rh. Miis., LXV, 
470-1 iti papyro psolo copumai M ipso loco pomas 
cdd. 257 via idXokottoviit] Lu. 308 om. via G 308 via 
OKoaioviiT) Gen., Bern. 83, 308 

Porph. : VIII edd. VII cdd. 

102 



BOOK VIII 

330 

She is allured by on adulterer ? : 

Priscianus: From 'lenteo' is derived 'lentesco,' like 'duresco' 
from ' duro,' ' viresco ' from ' vireo.' Lucilius in book V^ITI — 

her work slows up. 

331-2 

The adulterer seduces her : 

Nonius : ' Conponere,' to join together ... — 

" \\Tien I drink from the same cup, embrace her. 
lay my lips to her little ones (the scheming jade !) " — - 
that is, when I'm lustful." 

333 
Nonius : ' Conponere,' to join together ... — 
" Then she lays side to side and joins breast with 
breast." 

334 

Porphyrio : Lucilius says in book VIII — 

" and I about ^ to cross legs with legs," 

335 

Porphyrio : By ' mutto ' he meant the male organ, in 
imitation of Lucilius. For he in book VIII writes as follows — 

" But, with her left hand, from my counterpart 
My mistress '^ wipes the tears." 

" This is probably right. Nonius is probably wrong in 
quoting this fragment elsewhere as illustrating the use of 
fingere for lingere, as though ' fictrix ' meant a ' licker into 
shape.' (Non., 308, 18 fif.) 

'' StaAAa^cor, future iQj^ic- Possibly SiaAAa^ov, aorist im- yi^,^, 
perative. 

'^ Or perhaps it is amica (sc. manu) as in Martial, IX, 41 ; 
Priapea, XXXIII, 6 Mr. 

103 



LUCILIUS 

Sal. IT. 

336 

Nonius, 497, 36 : Genctivus positus pro ablativo ... — 

qiiariim et abundcmus rerum et quarum indigeamus. 

337-8 

Nonius, 119, 16 : ' Gigeria ' intostina gallinarum conquisita 
cocta ... — 

Gigeria insunt 
sive adeo hcpatia. 

339 

Nonius, 84, 8 : ' Colustra,' lac concretum in mammis ... — 

t hiberam insulam f omento omnicolore colustra. 



340 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 546, 9 K : ' Sallio ' sallitum facit, 
* sallo ' salsum ... — 

sallere murenas, merceni in frig-daria ferre. 



341-2 
Nonius, 212, 27 : *Mercatura ' feminini ... — 
verum et mercaturae omnes et quaesticuli isti 
intuti . . . 

337 gigeria (Bentin.) insunt Mr. gizeria insunt L gi- 
zeria ni sunt M gigeriae sunt S gizerini sunt cdd., an 
rerte ? 

339 Jortasse ferinam | . . . insulsam o. o. c. hiberam in- 
sulam fomcnto vel sim. cdd. vide Linds. ad he. permulsam 
fomento horto omnicolore colustra M 

^*^"2 iyti intuti S isti M instituti cdd. {sequitur in 
Non. Turpilius . . .) 

104 



BOOK VIII 

Sat. II. On table-luxury ? 

336 
Human needs : 

Nonius : The genitive put for the ablative . . . 
of what things we have plenty and of what we 
stand in need. 

337-8 
Some people are epicures : choice dishes : 
Nonius : ' Gigeria,' <* the choice cooked entrails of poultry 

There's giblets or indeed foies gras in it. 

339 

Nonius : ' Colustra,' milk congealed in the breasts . . . 
. . . with tripe of all hues, and beestings. 

340 

The fish-merchant : 

Priscianus : ' SalHo ' (I salt) makes ' salhtum ' its supine, 
' sallo ' (I salt) makes ' salsum ' . . . — 

to salt sea-murries,^ and to bring the wares into 
his cold-storage house. 

341-2 

Nonius : ' Mercatura ' of the feminine gender . , . 
but also all those business deals and those petty 
little profits that are unsafe . . . 

" It is uncertain whether the correct form is gizeria or 
girjeria. 

* The murena is a ' sea-eel ' [Murena helena). 



LUCILIUS 

343-4 

Nonius, 4, 1 : ' Tolutim ' dicitur quasi volutim ... — 
Si omne iter evadit stadiumque acclive tolutim, 

idem — 
Velle tolutim hie semper iter coepturus videtur. 

345-6 
Nonius, 533, 25 : ' Cercurus ' navis est Asiana pergrandis 

Verum flumen uti atque ipso divortio aquae vis 
propellit pedibus cercyrum currat ut aequis. 

LIBER IX 

Of the two satires in this book (written c. 112-111 B.C.), 
one deals with sights seen apparently on a walk in Rome 
during the month of March, and with thoughts about them ; 

Sat. I. 

347 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 251, 12 K : Invenitur etiam ' haec 
capis capidis ' cuius diminutivum est ' capidula ' . . . Lucilius 
inIX— 

Hinc ancilia, ab hoc apices capidasque repertas. 

^^* iter coepturus L et incepturus Bouterwek agi in- 
cepturus M semper incepturus cdd. 

345-6 yjg _ _ aequis W divortio igneis pedibus cercyrum 
concurret aequis cdd. aquae sunt . . . conferet Mr. de 
vortice montis saxura ingens pedibus cercurum currere ut 
aequis M aquarum ilignis . . . concinit lun. 

io6 



BOOK IX 

343-4 

The follotving fragments seem to refer to a Spanish 

Nonius : ' Tolutim ' (lifting up the feet ?) is a term used 
just like ' volutim ' , , . — 

If he passes over the whole track of the steep 
race-course at a rapid trot, 

the same poet — 

About to begin a journey, he seems to want it 
always at a rapid trot. 

345-6 
Nonius : ' Cercurus ' means a very large Asiatic ship ... — 
But, like a river and the rush of water from its very 
watershed, it pushes on the pinnace so that it runs 
along with the sheet-ropes let out equally.'^ 

BOOK IX 

and the other with rules of spelling and literary composition, 
which Lucilius lays down in opposition to the views of 
Accius. 

Sat. I. 

347 

The Salii, flamines, and poniifices : 

Priscianus : We find even nom. feminine ' capis,' gen. 
' capidis ' (one-handled bowl), of which the diminutive form 
is ' capidula ' . . . Lucilius in book IX — 

Hence arose the Shields, hence the invention of 
the Cone-Caps '^ and the Bowls. 

" i.e. with the viind right aft, at full speed (cp. Cic, ad 
Att.,XYI,6; Ov., i"., Ill, 565). This passage is desperately 
corrupt. The cercurus was really a light ship used particularl}' 
bv the Cj'prians. 

^* Plut., Nuvi., 13; Livy, VI, 41, 9; X, 7, 10; Cic, Par., I, 
11, The ancilia belonged particularly to the Salii, the apices 
to the flamifies, and the capides to the pontifices. 



LUCILIUS 
348 

Festus, 370, 32 : ' Redantrnare ' dicitur in Salionim cxulta- 
tionibus; " cum pracsul amptruavit," quod est motus cdidit, 
ei referuntur invicem idem motus. Lucilius — 

praesul ut amptruet inde, ut vulgus redamptruet 

inde. 

Cp. Non., 165, 17 (. . . Lucilius lib. IX . . . redandruet). 



349 

Nonius, 67, 17 : ' Parcutactoe ' qui de pueritia veniunt ad 
pubertatem . . . Lucilius lib. IX — 

unde pareutactoe clamides ac barbula prima. 



350-1 
Nonius, 18, 17 : ' Rutrum ' dictum est a ' radendo ' . . . — 
Frumentarius est ; modium hie seeum atque rutellum 
una adfert. 

348 vulgus Fest. ut vulgus Non. redandruet inde 

Non. redamplavit at Fest. [seqnitur Pacuvius . . .) 

Non. 67 : Pareutactoe qui Buecheler parectato hi qui 
cdd. 

^** unde vel inde cdd. pareutactoe chlamydes Bue- 

cheler parectato e calamides cdd. 

« Buecheler, Rh. Mus., XLVIIT, 1893, 631; Cichor., 44; 
C.I. A., Ill, 1, 107, 109 {TTapevraKToi mentioned; cp. 
■napevraKTeu) Polyb., HI, 50, 7; and even V, 56, 7). Cp. 
also Lucilius, Bk. XX\'III, 1. 816, pp. 262-3. 

io8 



BOOK IX 
348 



Dance of the Salii : 



Festus : ' Redantruare ' is a term used in describing the 
leapings of the SaUi (Jumpers, Dancers) ; " when the dance- 
leader ' amptruavit ' " (has leaped around), that is, has set 
the movements, all movements in reply are made to agree 
with his. Lucilius — 

that tlie dance-leader should leap around on this 
side and the chorus should leap around in time 
with him on that. 



349 

The ' ephebi ' of Attica : 

Nonius : ' Pareutactoe ' is a term apphed to those who 
from boyhood are approaching puberty , , , Lucilius in 
bk. IX— 

whence comes their name TrapetVaKTot (' in regular 
training '), and their cloaks and first short beard.*^ 



350-1 

Applicant for the corn-dole : 

Nonius : ' Rutrum ' (shovel) is a term derived from 
' rado ' * . . . — 

He's a corn-doler ; '^ he brings Avith him a peck- 
measure and a little shovel too. 

* riitrmn comes really from riio. 

" Cichorius, 292 ff., rightly sees in this fragment an allusion 
to a receiver of the corn dole after 123 e.g., rather than to 
a corn-dealer. Lucihus may be playing on both senses and I 
have translated accordingly. 

109 



LUCILIUS 

352-3 

Nonius, 44o, 13 : ' Acerosum ' et ' aceratum ' utrumque 
nove positum. . . . Aceratum est lutum paleis mixtura, ut 
laterariis usus est ... — 

Lateres qui ducit habet nihil amplius nuincjuam 
quam commune lutum ac paleas caenumque aceratum. 

354-5 
Nonius, 166, 4 : ' Ramites ' dicuntur pulmones vel hirnea 

quod deformis senex apOpiTLKoq ac podagrosus 
est, quod mancus miserque exilis ramite magno. 

356 

Priscianus ap. G.L., II, 507, IK:' Scabo, scabi ' . . . — 
Scaberat ut porcus contritis arbore costis. 

357-8 
Nonius, 216, 4 : ' Ostrea ' . . . (17) neutri . . . — 

Quid ergo si ostrea Cerco 
cognorit fluvium limum ac caenum sapere ipsum ? . . . 

352 lateres Leo G.G.A., 1906, (1), 848 nam laterem 
lun. et laterem M latere cdd. nil M mihi cdd. 
numquam Linds. a me Leo natum M unquam lun. 
nam quam cdd. 

353 ac paleas Francken a paleis cdd. caenumque 
aceroso cdd. cenoque aceratum M (aceratum D. (F.)) 

357 quid ergo ? si ostrea Cerco C 296-8 (ergo L) quid 
ergo si tenera ostrea M alii alia quid ego si cerno ostrea 
cdd. 

358 cognorit cdd. cognorim Bentin. 

no 



BOOK IX 
352-3 



a hrick-maker 



Nonius : ' Acerosum ' (wholemeal bread) and ' aceratum ' 
(clay mixed with chaflF) are both put as unusual words. . . . 
' Aceratum ' is " clay mixed with chaff, according to the custom 
of brickmakers ... — 

He who makes bricks never lias more than common 
natural clay and chaff, mixed mud and grain-husks.^ 



354-5 

an old icreck of a man : 

Nonius : ' Ramites ' (blood-vessels of the lungs) is a term 
used for lungs, or for a rupture ... — 

because he is a deformed, rheumaticky, gouty- 
old man, because he is a poor maimed lanky wretch 
with a big rupture. 

356 

Priscianus : ' Scabo,' perfect ' scabi ' . . . — 

He had scratched as a pig does by rubbing its 
ribs against a tree. 

357-8 

an old glutton with spoilt palate : 

Nonius : ' Ostrea ' ... of the neuter gender ... — 

What then if Cerco '^ finds that oysters taste 
of the very mud and mire of the rivers ? 

" The distinction drawn by Nonius was not stricth" observed 
bv the Romans. 
"" cf. Leo, G.G.A., 1906, (i), 848. 
" Cichor., 296-8. 

Ill 



LUCILIUS 

359-60 

Nonius, 497, 36 : Genctivus positus pro ablativo . . . 
(498, 14)— 

Si nihil ad faciem et si olim liipa prostibulumque, 
iiiimmi opus atque opus fit. 

361 
Nonius, 19, 20 : ' Evannetur ' . . . — 
Crisabit ut si frumentum clunibus vannat. 

362-3 
Nonius, 455, 10 : ' Rostrum ' . . . — 

Arripio et rostrum labeasque huic Zop) riatim 
percutio dentesque advorsos discutio omnes. 

364 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 100 K : ' Lora ' . . . e corio vin- 
cula ... — 

ipsa suo e corio omnia lora. 

365 
Gellius, I, 16, 10 : Lucilius ... in libro IX ... — 
Tu milli nummuni potes uno quaerere centum. . . . 
dixit . . . ' uno milli nummum ' pro ' unis mille nummis 
Cp. Macrob., Sal., I., 5, 7. 

3^" opus fit coni. H subit M assis Lips obsi 
{ = 6,Pov) Leo, G.G.A., 1906 (i), 849 obsit cdd. 

^^^ crisabitque D(L) crissavit lun. cursavit cdd. 

^^2 huic Westerhow zopyriatim Varges vociferanti M 
huic zopyrioni Junius hoc zopyrioni L hoc zeferiat in 
aid. fortasse ne feriat me 

^** suo e M si se cdd. 



with her buttocks. ^ rJ^L . v^ 

362-3 



BOOK IX 

359-60 
an old u'hore : 

Nonius : The genitive put for the ablative ... — 
If she's nothing much in looks, and if she was of 
old a whore and a harlot, shew a shilling, she'll be 
willing. 

361 
Nonius : ' Evannetur ' . . . — j^ 

She'll jerk as though she were winnowing corn y^ ^ 

a fight: f% 

Nonius : ' Rostrum ' . . . — 

I lay hold of him Zopyrion-wise.* I hit his mug 
and his lips and shatter all his teeth that meet my 
blows. 

364 
Charisius : ' Lora ' ... as meaning bonds made out of 
hide ... — 

even all the straps from his hide.^ 

365 
Good business in Rome : 

GeUius : Lucilius ... in the ninth book ... — 
With but one thousand sesterces you can get a 
hundred (thousand) . . .'^ 

, . . used . . . ' uno miUi nummum ' instead of ' unis 
mUle nummis.' 

° If this reading be right, there is an allusion not to the 
Persian Zopyrus (Herod., Ill, 154; Justin, III, 10 S.), but 
to the slave mentioned by Lucilius in bk. XXII, fr. 626. 

^ Apparently some sort of proverb, but the meaning is not 
clear. 

'^ sc. sesterces ; or one hundred delicacies. 

113 
VOL. III. I 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. II. 

Cp. Accius, Remains of Old Latin, Vol. II, introd., pp. 
xxii-xxiv. The extant fragments of Lucilius given below 
have caused much discussion, especially as to whether Lucilius 
meant to lay down rules not only of speUing but also of pro- 
nunciation. The chief points arise out of the rules for ' i ' 
and ' ei ' (Lines 375 fif.). See Sommer, in Hermes, XLIV, 

366-7 

Nonius, 286, 33 : ' Discere ' est ignotam rem meditando 
assequi ... — 

Labora 
discere ne te res ipsa ac ratio ipsa refellat. 

Porphvrio, ad Hor., S., I, 10, 53 : meminit Lucilius IX 
et X. 

368-72 

Terentius Scaurus, ap. G.L., VII, 18, K : Lucilius in nono 
saturarum de orthographia praecipiens ait — 

* a ' primum est, hinc incipiam, et quae nomina ab 

hoc sunt. . . . 

deinde — 

' aa ' primum longa, * a ' brevis syllaba ; nos tamen 

unum 
hoc faciemus et uno eodemque ut dicimus pacto 
scribemus pacem Pacideianum, aridum, acetum, 
Apes "Apes Graeci ut faciunt. 

^'^'^''^ labora d. n. te res D (I.) discere 1. n. r. t. aid. 

'■^*^^ post sunt trib. Liicil. deinde M 

369 aa geminum longa a brevis Ribb. a primum longa 
brevis cdd. diximus D (I.) 

^^^ pacem Pacideianum B pacem placide ianum aridum 
cdd. 

^^^ ^Ap€s "Apes I) (I.) apec ape vel sim. cdd. 

114 



BOOK IX 

Sat. II. On literary compositicm. Rules of spelling. 

70 fif.; Fay, in Am. Joiirn. Phil, XXXTII, no. 131, 311 ff . ; 
Kent, in id., XXXII, no. 127, 272 ff. (full detaHs) and in 
Glotta, lY, 299 ff. ; Siiss in U., LXII, 342 ff. ; Colson in C.Q., 
XV, 1921, 11-17. My own view is that Lucilius deals with 
spelling primarily. 

366-7 
Attention required : 

Nonius : ' Discere ' means to become master of a thing 
not known, by studying it . . . — 

Take pains to learn, lest the very essence and 
the very principle of the thing should elude you.*^ 

we shall differ * from the teaching of Accius : 

Porphyrio : Lucilius makes mention of Accius in (books) 
IX and X. 

368-72 
Vowels, a : " 

Terentius Seaurus : Lucilius, laying down the rules of good 
spelling in the ninth book of the Satires, says — 

' a ' comes first ; I will begin with this and then 
the letter-names which come after it. . . . 
and then — 

First ' aa ' for the long, ' a ' for the short syllable.'^ 
But we vAW spell both ^vith one letter, and as we say 
now will write in one and the same way pacem 
Pacideianum, aridum acetum,^ just as the Greeks 
do with ^Apcs "Ape?. 

« Siiss, H., LXII, 346-7. 

* i.e. from Accius' rules on spelling only (it seems). 

" cf. also E, Cocchia, Atti della r. ac. di Napoli, N.S., V, 
1917, 337 ff. 
'^ says Accius. 

* on Pacideianus see above, lines 172 ff. ; aridum, acetum, 
dry, wine- vinegar. ''Apes "Ape? — Homer, Iliad, V, 31. 

115 
i2 



LUCILIUS 

373 

Nonius, 503, 16 : Ab co quod est ' fervit ' brcviato acccntu 
' fcrvcre ' facit, ut ' spcrno spernere ' . . . — 

Fervere ne longum. Vero hoc lictoribus tradam. 
374 

Quintil., I, 6, 8 : Apud Lucilium — 

Fervit aqua et fervet ; fervit nunc fervet ad annum. 

Cp. Non., 503, 11 : (. . . Lucilius lib. IX. . . .) Prise, 
ap. G.L., II, 478, 18 K ; Prob., ap. G.L., IV, 241, 22 K. 

375-6 

Charisius, ap. C.L., I, 78, 8 ff. : Lucilius . . . et per unura 
'i' . . . genetiVum scribi posse exist imat . . . — 

Porro hoc si fihus Luci 
fecerit, i solum, ut ' Corneh Cornificique.' 

377-9 

Velius Longus, ap. G.L., VII, 56, 2 K : Alii . . . quorum 
est . . . Lucilius, varie scriptitaverunt; siquidem in iis 
quae producerentur alia per ' i ' longam alia per ' e ' et ' i ' 
notaverunt, velut differentia quadam separantes, ut cum 
diceremus ' viri,' si essent plures, per ' e ' et ' i ' scriberemus. 



fervere e, ne vel fervere ne e longum fervere 

an e L vero cdd. verum Mr. lictoribus vel 

lectoribus cdd. 

3^5-6 yide M ad loc, et G.L., I, 78 

" The normal conjugation in best Latin prose is ferveo, 
fervere. 

* apparently a pun on ' corripere,' make a syllable or vowel 
short, and ' corripere,' arrest; cf. Siiss, H., LXII, 342-3. 
But Lucilius may have written ' lectoribus ' ' my readers.' 

ii6 



BOOK IX 

373 

e : 

Nonius : From the word ' fervit ' comes ' fervere ' " witli 
shortened tone, as ' spemo, spernere ' . . . — 

' Fervere,' not with long ' e.' To be sure, I'll 
leave this to the beadles.* 

374 

Quintilian : We have in a passage of Lucilius — ■ 
Water boils {fervit) and will boil {fervet) ; ' fervit ' 
now, ' fervet ' for the coming year. 

375-6 
i and ei .• *= 

Charisius : Lucilius thinks that the genitive can also be 
written with one ' i ' . . . — 

Further, in " If the son of Lucius (Luci) does this," 
put ' i ' alone, as in "of Cornelius and Cornificius " 
{Cornell Cornificique). 

377-9 

Velius Longus : Others, of whom . . . Lucilius is one, 
used to differ in their spelling : thus in the case of i-vowels 
which were pronounced long they spelt some with i long, 
some with e and i, really making a certain distinction of 
usage, so that when we said "viri," nominative plural, we 
should write it ' virei ' with ' e ' and ' i ' ; but if it was genitive 

^ The order of the succeeding fragments seems to me to 
be estabhshed by the following references : Charis., G.L., 
I, 78 (lines 375-6); Charis., op. cit., 79 (379); Quint,, I, 7, 15 
(377-8); Vel. Long., G.L., VII, 56, 2 (377-9); Quint., I.e. 
(380-1); Vel., o;>. cit., 56, 10 (382-3); Vel., 56, 13 (386-7). 
Any further alteration of Marx's order would be wrong. See 
also Kent, Am. J. Ph., XXXII, no. 127, 281; id., XXXIV, 
no. 135, 315 fiF., cp. Siiss, H., LXII, 347. Skutsch, Glotta, 
I, 310 and others add lines 380-1 to this fr. 

117 



LUCILIUS 

si vero esset unius ' viri,' per i notarcmus. Et Lucilius in 
nono — 

lam ' puerei venere ' * e ' postremum facito atque * i ' 

ut puerei plures fiant ; ' i ' si facis solum. 

* pupilli pueri Lucili,' hoc unius fiet. 

Cp. Charis., ap. G.L., I, 79 K. ; QuintiL, I, 7, 15. 

380-1 

Quintil., I, 7, 15 : Ac deinceps idem — 

' Mendaci ' * furique ' addes ' e,' cum dare furei 
iusseris. 

382-3 
Velius Longus, ap. G.L., VII, 56, 10 K : Item — 
' Hoc illi factum est uni,' tenue hoc fades ' i ' ; 
' haec illei fecere,' addes ' e,' ut pinguius fiat. 

384-7 

Terentius Saurus, ap. G.L., VII, 18, 23 K : Itemque quod 
Lucilius ubi ' i ' exile est per se iubet scribi, at ubi plenum 
est praeponendum esse ' e ' credit, his versibus — 



^'^ fiant Quint. faciant Vel. 

^®" mendaci Furique [genetiv.]; addes e cum dare furei 
iusseris <aut mendacei homini> Skutsch, Glotta, I, 310. 
cum dabi ' Furi, Mr. dato, Furei L 



« Fay, op. cit., 313. Cp. lines 375-6. 

* For discussions on this fragment see Fay, Am. J. Ph., 
XXXIII, p. 313 and id. XXXVI, no. 141, 79; Colson, 
C.Q., XV, 13 if. ; Sommer, //., XLIV, 76-7 ; Suss, H., LXII, 
343-4; .Skutsch, Glotta, I, 310. It may be that Lucilius 

Il8 



BOOK IX 

singular, we should represent it with an ' ?.' Thus Lucilius 
in the ninth book — 

Now the next point: — "the boys have come;" 
put at the end (of puerei) ' e ' and ' i,' that the 
puerei may express the plural, boys. If you put ' i * 
alone, " pupilli, pueri, Liicili " then you make it 
express the genitive singular (of an orphan, of a boy, 
of Lucilius).'^ 

380-1 

Quintilian : And again the same poet — 

To mendaci (a liar) Mi^furi (a thief) add ' e ' when 
you order anyone to give it to a thief (Jtiret) or to a 
liar {inendacei).^ 

382-3 

Velius Longus : Again — 

" This was done illi uni " (to him alone) ; this ' i ' 
you will write simple. " All this illei (they) did; " 
add ' e ' that it may become richer/ 

384-7 

Terentius Scaurus : And again, Lucilius orders that when 
i is ' thin ' it should be written by itself, but when it is ' full,' 
he believes e should be put in front, in these lines — 

here uses dare like our colloquial " to give it to someone," 
and says : Add ' e ' to the dative so as to give. For the 
ablative (take-away-case) Lucilius may thus have said " take 
away a letter." But it is hardly likely that he really did lay 
down such fatuous precepts except perhaps to provide 
mnemonics for rules of spelling. 

' Suss, H., LXII, 345-6. Skutsch, Glotta, I, 309. Does 
Lucilius, in the matter of ille and the like, break his rule 
of "-ei ' for the dative singular in order to distinguish UUi 
plural ? 

119 



LUCILIUS 

Mille ' hominum, duo ' milia ' ; item hue ' e ' 
utroque opus ' nieillc, 
meilia.' lam tenues * i ' ' pila ' in qua lusimus, ' pilum ' 
quo piso, ' i ' tenues. Si plura haec feceris ' pila ' 
quae iacimus, addes ' e,' ' peila,' ut plenius fiat. 

Cp. Vcl. Long., ap. G.L., VII, 56, 13 K; Marius Victorin,, 
ap. G.L., VI, 18, 3 K. 



388 

Quintil., I, 7, 18 : ' Ae ' syllabam cuius secundam nunc 
' ' litteram ponimus varie per ' a ' et ' i ' efferebant . . . est 
in hac quoque parte Lucili praeceptum ... in nono. 

Martianus Capella, III, 266 . . . Lucilius in dativo casu 
* a ' et ' e ' coniungit dicens — 

t huic Terentiae Orbiliae Licinius f 

Cassiodorius, ap. G.L., VII, 149, 1 K : Q littera tunc recte 
ponitur cum illi statim ' u ' littera et alia quaelibet una 
pluresve vocales coniunctae fuerint ita ut una syllaba fiat; 
cetera per ' c ' scribuntur. Hoc quoque Lucilio videtur. 



384 vide G.L., VII, 19. mille . . . milia Colson C.Q., 

XV, 12 meiUe . . . meilia S 

384-5 nieille | meilia iam Colson meiles | meilitiam S 
mille militiam cdd. pila in qua Fay, A. J. P., XXXIII, 

pp. 313 sqq. {uhi et tenuest) tenue i. pilam Ken pila 

in, qua Siiss, //., LXII, 348 pilam qua ludimus S alii 
alia pinsimus Kent 

386 piso, * i ' tenues \V tenue i, si plura Kent om. i Ter. 

Cassiod. : Lucilio Semler lucio cdd. 



" here Lucilius shortens the vowel-name — Colson, C.Q., 
XV, 12. But see Kent, A.J. P., XXXIV, 318. Lucilius must 
mean ])ila both in the singular and in the plural. 



BOOK IX 

A thousand (mille) men, two thousand (milia); 
here again an ' e ' is needed in both, meille, meilia. 
Now the next point : — you must put a simple short 
' i ' '^ in pila (ball) at which we have played, also a 
simple long ' i ' in pilum (pestle) with which I pound. 
If you make a neuter plural, e.g. plla (spears) which 
we' throw, add ' e,' peila, that it may be a fuller word.'' 



388 

Diphthongs, ae : 

Quint ilian : The syllable ' ae,' for whose second letter we 
now put ' e,' they used to pronounce differently, with ' a ' 
and ' i ' . . . On this point also there is a precept of Lucilius 
... in the ninth book. 

Martianus Capella : Lucilius joins ' a ' to ' e ' in the dative 
case, when he says — 

' Tereniiae ' and * Orbiliae,' ' To this Terentia . . . 
and Orbilia ' Licinius *^ 



Consonants, q : 

Cassiodorius : It is right to put the letter ' q ' when the 
letter ' u ' and any other single or several vowels are directly 
joined to it in such a way that one syllable is made; in all 
other instances ' c ' is written. This is the opinion of 
Lucilius among others. 



^ See Fay, Am. J. Ph. XXXIII, no. 131, 313-6; Colson, 
C.Q., XV, 12; Suss, H., LXII, 348; Kent, Am. J. Ph., 
XXXII, 272 ff.; XXXIV, no. 135, 315 ff.; Sommer, H., 
XLIV, 75. 

'^ If this fr. is not wholly corrupt (Liclmus certainly is, 
probably for Licinus), then Martianus has given simply some 
relevant words, not the whole fragment. 

121 



LUCILIUS 

389-92 

Velius Longus, ap. G.L., VII, 47, 1 K : Possit etiara 
plerosque consonantes et omnes semivocales pro syllabis 
ponere. Nam apud Lucilium in nono, in quo de litteris 
disputat, omnes vicem syllabarum implent, cum dicit — 

' r ' ; non multum est hoc cacosyntheton atque 

canina 
si lingua dico ; nihil ad me ; nomen enim illi est. 

Item — 

' s ' nostrum et semigraeci quod dicimus * sigma ' 
nil erroris habet. 

Apparet ergo haec nihil aliud quam locum syllabae tenere nee 
tamen syllabas esse. 

Velius Longus, ap. G.L., VII, 60, 14 K : Antiquos scimus et 

* abs te ' dixisse . . . scimus ipsos et ' ab LuciUo ' dixisse. 

393 

VeUus Longus, ap. G.L., VII, 62, 18 K : ' Abbibere ' etiam 
quidam geminato ' b ' maluerunt et dicere et scribere inter- 
missa ' d,' et in hoc nuUam differentiam putat esse Lucihus 
qui ait — 

* abbibere ' ; hie non multum est ' d ' siet an ' b.' 

^*' r Mr. a re cdd. 

^^" ad cdd. ar D (I.) enim M hoc cdd. 
Vel. Lwif]. 60, 14 K : trih. Lucilio Becker. 
393 hie add. M 



" the ' half- vowels ' f, 1, m, n, r, s, x, which can be spoken 
with continued sound ; x tended to become ss in vulgar speech. 
'' r a snarling sound ' er,' as opposed to evawdeaia. 
'^ i.e. ' r ' pronounced. 

122 



BOOK IX 

389-92 

r ; s : 

Velius Longus : It would be possible to write even most 
consonants and all the half- vowels ^ so as to represent syllables. 
For in Lucilius, in the ninth book, in which he argues about 
letters, all of these play the part of syllables, when he says — 

' r ' ; it does not make much difference if I speak 
this in an ugly sound-unit ^ and in dog-language ; 
I am not answerable for it, because that sound '^ 
is its name. 

Again — 

our ' s ' and what we call in our half-Greek way 
' sigma ' has no fault in it. 

It is clear therefore that they reaUy do stand as syllables 
and are stiU not syllables.'^ 

'prepositions, a, ah : 

VeUus Longus : We know that the archaic writers said 
' abs te ' . . . and that they also said ' ab Lucilio.' 

393 

ad : 

Velius Longus : Some even preferred to speak and write 
' abbibere ' (to drink in) with double ' b,' ' d ' being dropped, 
and Lucilius thinks this makes no diflference ; he says — 

' abbibere ' ; here it is not of much moment 
whether we have ' d ' or • b.' 

^ in fact, in Lucilius these letters are to be taken as pro- 
nounced rather than named; probably also, in naming, e.g., 
letter m, Lucihus made a mere mumble with tips closed, 
instead of saying ' em.' But sometimes he naturally used, 
for the other consonants, their names, for metrical reasons, 
just as he liked. Thus, in the next fragment 'd' and 'b' 
must be pronounced as ' de,' ' be,' in order to make them 
occupy the position of a long syllable. 

123 



LUCILIUS 

394-5 

Velius Longiis, ap. G.L., VII, 61, 16 K : Haec similiter 
littera ('c') geminatur in eo quod est ' capio accipio '; 
itaque Lucilius — 

atque ' adcurrere ' scribas 
' d ' ne an ' c ' non est quod quaeras atque labores. 

396 

Velius Longus, ap. G.L., VIT, 65, 11 K : ' Per' vero prae- 
positio omnibus integfa praeponitur, nisi cum incidit in ' 1 ' 
litteram, adfinem consonantem . . . nee aliter apud Luciliura 
legitur ... — 

' pelliciendus,' quod est inducendus, geminat ' 1.' 

397 
Pompeius, ap. G.L., V, 289, K : Lucilius . . . ait . . . — 
Adde soloecismon genera atque vocabula centum. 

Et percurrit ipsa vocabula versibus scriptis arte, et ibi 
enumerat ilia omnia. 

Cp. Donatus, ap. G.L., IV, 393, 18 K : a/. 

398-400 

Charisius, ap. G.L., III, 6 K : ' Intro ' est in locum, ' intus ' 
in loco . . . Lucilius ... — 

Nam veluti ' intro ' aliud longe esse atque ' intus ' 

videmus, 
sic item ' apud te ' aliud longe est, neque idem 

valet 'ad te ' ; 
* intro ' nos vocat at sese tenet ' intus.' ' 

•'^^ atque vuUjo eque M aeque c<l. 

396 (rpminato L 
3»^ ex libro IX ? X coni. M 
398-400 irih. lib. IX D (F.) 
398 item add. L vide M p. 83 
124 



BOOK IX 
394-5 

Velius Longus : In like manner this letter ' c ' is doubled 
in the word ' accipio ' (from ' caiiio ') ; therefore LueiUus — 

and there is no need to query and make a fuss as 
to whether you will write ' accurrere ' (to run to) 
with a ' d ' (' adcurrere ') or a ' c ' (' accurrere '). 

396 

per : 

Velius Longus : But the preposition per is put unaltered 
before all words except when it falls next to the letter ' 1,' 
a related consonant . . . nor do we read otherwise in Lucilius 

' pelliciendus,' which means ' he must be led on,' 
doubles the ' 1.' 

397 

Solecisms and usages : 

Pompeius : Lucilius . . . says ... — 

Take also a hundred kinds of solecisms and their 
word-forms/' 

And he runs through the word-forms themselves in skilfully 
written lines, and in them enumerates all the solecisms. 

398-400 
intro, intus : 

Charisius : ' Intro ' means into a place, ' intus ' in a place 
. . . Lucilius ... — 

For just as we see that ' into ' is something far 
different from ' inside,' so also ' with you ' is some- 
thing far different from ' to you ' and has not the 
same force. A man calls us ' into,' but his position 
is ' inside.' 

" Marx attributes this line to bk. X. 

125 



LUCILIUS 

401-10 

Nonhis, 428, 5 : ' Poesis ' et ' poema ' . . . — 
Non haec quid valeat, quidve hoc intersit et illud, 
cognoscis. Primum hoc quod dicimus esse ' poema.' 
Pars est parva ' poema ' <:^' poesis.'^ 

Idem — 

Epistula item quaevis non magna ' poema ' est ; 
ilia * poesis ' opus totum, ut tota Ilias una est, 
una 0€(TL<; sunt Annales Enni atque eVos unum, 
et maius multo est quam quod dixi ante ' poema,' 
quapropter dico — nemo qui culpat Homerum 
perpetuo culpat, neque quod dixi ante ' poesin '; 
versum unum culpat, verbum, enthymema, locumve. 

LIBER X 

Sat. I. 

Vita Persii, p. 238 (lahn) : Lecto Lucili libro decimo 
vehementer saturas componere instituit . . . sibi primo mox 
omnibus detractaturus cum . . . recentium poetarum et 
oratorum insectatione. 



*°^ valeat cdd. valeant L hoc intersit et illud coni. 

^Ir. inter sit Deubner intersiet illud cdd. {an recte ?) 

^"2 poema vel poesis cdd. ' poema ' ' poesis ' W 

*^^ ut tota Ilias una est D (I.) totaque ilia summast cdd. 

^"^ sunt L, Vahlen velut Leo ut cdd. Itto? L 
opus ]\I estoc cdd. 

•*"' et Linds. est cdd. 

*^° locumve L locum unum M locumque vel. 

locum cdd. poema Leo 

.126 



BOOK X 

401-10 
What is poetry ? : " 

Nonius : ' Poesis ' (a long poem) and ' poema ' (a passage 
of verse, a small poem) ... — 

You do not understand what this (poesis) means 
and how the one differs from the other. First take 
that which we call a ' poem.' A ' poem ' is a small 
part of' poesy.' 

The same writer — 

Again any epistle (in verse) which is not long is a 
' poem,' but the ' poesy ' above mentioned is a whole 
work just as the whole Iliad and the Annals of 
Ennius each make one theme and one epic ; and it is 
a much bigger thing than that (namely, a ' poem ') 
which I mentioned before. WTierefore I say : no 
one w^ho blames Homer blames him all through, 
nor that which I mentioned before — his ' poesy ' ; 
he blames a line, a word, a thought, or a passage.^ 

BOOK X^ 

Sat. I. On style in poetry and oratory. 

Life of Persius : Having read the tenth book of Lucilius 
he eagerly set about composing satires destined to disparage 
in this way first himself, and soon the general public, including 
persecution of poets and orators of recent date. 

" dispute with Accius ? 

* The distinction which Lucilius draws is not between 
a poem and poetry in the abstract, but between a small 
piece of verse (independent or as an episode or mere phrase) 
and a long continuous work like the Iliad, cf. Deubner, //., 
XLV, 311-2; Fiske, 148-9. 

'^ So far as we can tell from the meagre remains, two satires 
formed the contents of this book. One seems to carry on 
the theme of the second (?) satu-e of book IX, while from the 
other we have apparently a stormy landing from a fleet in 
some war. 

127 



LUCILIUS 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 10, 53 : ' Nil comis tragici mutat 
Lucilius Acci ? ' Facit autem haec Lucilius cum alias turn vcl 
maximc in tertio libro : meminit IX et X. 



411 

Atil. Forhin., G.L., VI, 278, 17 K : Quod si omnia velis 
cognoscere et nomina et genera metrorum . . . veteres 
legemus, id est ut ait Lucilius — 

archeotera . . . undo haec sunt omnia nata. 



412 

Donatus, ad Ter., Andr., II, 1, 24 : ' Ne iste baud mecum 
sentit.' ' ne,' valde, aut ut quidam volunt ' o quam.' Luci- 
lius in X — 

— " Ne tu in arce bovem descripsti magnifice," 
inquit. 

Servius, ad Aen., VIII, 83 : Sciendum . . . hoc esse 
vitiosum monosyllabo finiri versum, nisi forte ipso mono- 
syUabo minora explicentur animalia . . . Gratiores enim 
versus isti sunt secundum Lucilium. 



411 trib. lib. XXX Fiske, IX Mr. archeotyra cd. A. 
-pa cd. B archetypa ed. princ. archetypos Keil 

412 ne tu . . . descripsti H, C.Q. I, 57 ne ego ilium M 
ne ! quern Mr, vrj rov Buecheler ne qui Dziatzko 
ne quem vulgo ne cdd. ABV neque TC cdd. deter. 
descripsisti cd. V descripsit cd. C descripsi rell. 

Serv., Aen., VIII, 83 : lib. IX tribuitur, fortasse rede 



° i.e. of Homer, thinks Marx ; of the old comedy, thinks 
Fiske, 109, 281, who assigns the fragment to book XXX. 
Lucilius may have written apx^rurra, ' original models.' 

128 



BOOK X 



(a) On poetic compositions : 

Porphyrio : ' Is there nothing in the tragedy writer Accius 
which poHte Lucilius would like to alter ' ? Lucihus does in 
fact do this above all in the third book, and also elsewhere; 
he mentions him in books IX and X. 



411 

Ancient masters as sources of style : 

Atilius Fortunatianus : But if you want to know aU the 
names and classes of metres . . . we will read the old writers, 
that is in the words of Lucilius — 

the older works," whence all these have arisen. 

412 

One writer praises another : 

Donatus on ' ne ' in Terence : ' Ne,' strongly ; or, as 
some would have it, ' oh how ' — . Lucilius in the tenth 
book — 

" Oh, how magnificently " said he, ** did you 
describe ^ the ' bull on the citadel.' " 

On monosyllabic endings [of Ennius ?) : 

Servius : Still we must understand that it is bad verse- 
composition when a line ends in a monosyllable, unless 
perhaps by that very monosyllable the smaller animals are 
expressed . . . For thus, according to Lucilius, such lines 
as these are more pleasing. 

* apparently in a poem imitating Attic comedy, from 
which the Attic proverb /Sou? eV TroAei was drawn; or in an 
eVtSet^ts in a speech (Fiske, 110). See Jahn, H., Ill, 181. 
A huge bronze buU was dedicated on the Athenian acropolis. 

129 
VOL. III. K 



LUCILIUS 
413 

Servius, ad Aen., XI, 602 : ' Horret ager,' terribilis est. 
Est autem versus Ennianus, vituperatus a Lucilio dicente per 
inrisionem debuisse eum dicere — 

horret et alget. 

Cp. Hor., S., I, 10, 54. 

Hieronymus, Comment, in Michaeam, II, 7 (vol. VI, 518-9 
Vail. ; VI, 1220 Mignc) : Poeta sublimis, non Homerus alter 
ut Lucilius de Ennio suspicatur, sed primus Homerus apud 
Latinos. 



Cp. Hor., Ep.y II, I, 50. 



414-5 



Schol., ad luv., Ill, 175 : Exodiarius apud veteres in fine 
ludorum intra bat qui ridiculus foret. . . . spectaculi . . . 
huius et Lucilius meminit — 

Principio exitus dignus 
exodiumque sequatur. 



416 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., IX, 573 : Ut ait Lucilius — 

bonum schema 

est quotiens sensus variatur in iteratione verborum, et in 
fine positus sequentis fit exordium ; qui appellatur ' climax.' 



*^3 add. ex Ennio * sparsis hastis longis campus ' et M 
413-6 e;c lihro X ? vel IX ? 

*i*"5 ex lihro XP sequatur M sequetur edd. 

sequitur Schol. 

130 



BOOK X 

413 

On awkward lines of Ennius : 

Servius : on ' horret ager ' in Virgil : ' Horret ' means ' is 
terrible.' It is in fact a line of Ennius jibed at by Lucilius 
who derisively says that he ought to have put horret et alget — 

bristles and shivers. 

Stillt Ennius was a great poet : 

Jerome : A subUme poet, not a second Homer, as Lucilius 
suspects of Ennius, but the first Homer amongst the Latins. 



414-5 

Take care about the plot of a icork : 

A SchoHast on ' exodium ' « : In the old writers an ' after- 
piece actor ' used to come in at the end of the play in order 
to be funny. . . . Amongst others Lucilius mentions this 
spectacle — 

Let an ending and afterpiece follow whicli shall 
be worthy of the beginning. 



416 

(&) On oratory. The ' climax ' ; 

Servius (supplemented) : — 

a good figure 

as LucUius says comes whenever any sense is altered by 
repetition of words, and being put at the end of a clause is 
also the beginning of the next; this is called a ' cUmax.' 



« a comic piece added to plays (chiefly Atellanae); under 
the empire it was given as a separate show after tragedies. 

k2 



LUCILIUS 

417-8 

Nonius, 396, 13 : ' Sumcre ' etiam significat cligcrc. . . . 
Lucilius Satyrarum lib. X — 

Horiini est iudiciunij crisis ut describimus ante ; 
hoc est, quid sumam quid non, in quoque locemus. 

Chir. Fortunat., Ill, G, ap. R.L., 124, 7 H : Quid hie aliud 
observabimus ? Ut quae verba magis sonantia sunt, ea 
potius conlocemus, quae Lucilius ' euphona appellat.' 

418a 

Nonius, 262, 5 : ' Confidentia ' rursum temeritas, audacia 
. . . idem lib. X — 

improbus confidens nequam malus ut videatur. 

Sat. II. 
419 

Nonius, 234, 37 : ' Aptum ' rursum conexum et conligatum 
significat ... — 

tonsillas quoque praevalidis in funibus aptas. 

420 
Nonius, 512, 22 : ' Firmiter ' pro firme ... — 
fluctibus a ventisque adversis firmiter essent. 

*^' honorum cdd. bonorum D (I.) crisis L, M 

Crassis C crassis cdd. ut cdd. sicut Corpet 

discribimus cdd. descripsimus D (I.) dixi scribimus Leo 

*i^<» lib. X G. om. X Oen. al. liber Linds. [trih. Pacuvio) 
praecedit in Non. Pac. Alal. gradere . . . confidentiam 
[Remains, II, 182-3) tunc idem e. q. s. idem (sc. Pac.) ** 
idem {sc. Lucil.) lib. X Gerlach ut add. Mr., L 

*i» praevalidis D (F.) ex vet. cd. quae validis M 
quoque validis Buecheler quoque validis cdd. 

132 



BOOK X 

417-8 

Choice of words or phrases {or topics ?) : 

Nonius : ' Sumere ' also means to choose. . . . Lucilius 
in the tenth book of Satires — 

Such persons as these use judgment, ' selection ' 
as I describe it before ; that is what word I should 
choose and what not, and where we should place it.^ 

Choice of pleasant-sounding words : 

Chir. Fortunat. : What other rule shall we keep here ? 
We should prefer to arrange together words which are of the 
more sounding sort, words which Lucilius calls ' musical.' 

' 418a 

The unprincipled modern orator ? : 

Nonius : ' Confidentia ' means also rashness, boldness . . . 
the same poet in bk. X — 

that he appears a bold bad villain audacious and a 
worthless waster.^ 

Sat. II. 

419 

Mooring of ships : 

Nonius : ' Aptum ' means also entwined and bound up 

and also the mooring-stakes bound up in strong 
ropes. 

420 

Nonius : ' Firmiter ' for ' firme ' . . . — 

they might stand firm against the dashing waves 
and winds. 

" Fiske 110 and 463, and in T.A.P., XL, 124. Cichor. 
300. Perhaps ' To these principles belong judgment . . . ' 

^ Lindsay, C.Q., XX, 63 argues that this is a line of Pacuvius. 
The matter is doubtful; see apparatus criticus. 

133 



LUCILIUS 
421 

Nonius, 517, 10: ' Dcsubito ' . . . (34)— 
quamvis desubito trinis deducere scalis. 

422 
Nonius, 219, 12 : ' Pigror ' generis masculini ... — - 
Languor obrepsitque pigror torporque quietis. 

423 
Nonius, 552, 30 : * Rorarii ' . . . — 
Pone paludatos stabat rorarius velox. 



LIBER XI 

The character of this book, written between 116 and 
110 B.C., and containing only one satire, is well marked. It 
consisted of a number of anecdotes about well-known con- 
temporaries of Lucilius (Cichor., 302flF.); we can see six of 

424-5 

Gellius, IV, 17, 1 : Lucilii ex XI versus sunt — 
Scipiadae magno improbus obiciebat Asellus 
lustrum illo censore malum infelixque fuisse. 

' Obiciebat ' ' o ' littera producta multos legere audio. 

Cp. Cic, de Oral., II, 268 (et 258 ?). 

*2^ fortasse scalis deducere trinis 

*22 obrepsitque pigror languor Mr. (obrepsitque lun.) 
obressitque {vel -quae) cdd. fortasse obpressit quietis 
cdd. vietus Mr. 

*23 paludatos Mr. -um Dousa (F.) -us cdd. 

" or perhaps it is quietis, ' of sleep.' 

^ On Scipio his particular friend Lucilius probably dwelt 
at greater length than he did on other prominent men of the 
day, and of course in a comi^hmentary not satiric manner. 



BOOK XI 
421 

Orders to land : 

Nonius : ' Desubito ' . . . — 

ever so suddenly to lead do^vn by three ladders 
from each (ship). 

422 

Rest : 

Nonius : ' Pigror ' of the masculine gender ... — 

As they lay quiet,^ weariness . . . and sloth 
and numbness crept upon them. 

423 
A battle-line made ready : 
Nonius : ' Korarii ' . . . — 

Behind those in soldier's cloaks was standing the 
swift skirmisher. 

BOOK XI 

these anecdotes, and in five cases chance has preserved for 
us, so far as I can see, the beginning of the story. The 
whole book was perhaps addressed to one Pacenius (see line 
440). 

424-5 

/. On Scipio AemilianusJ' 

(a) On the censorship of Scipio and Mummius (b.c. 142) ; 

GeUius : From the eleventh book of Lucilius there are the 
lines — 

The villain Asellus ^ laid to the charge of the great 
son o' Scipio 's house, that when he was censor it 
was a bad and unlucky period.^ 

I hear many read ' obiciebat ' with the vowel ' o ' long. 

* Tiberius Claudius Asellus, who as a tribune accused 
Scipio in 140 B.C. 

^ lustrum means the five years between the opening of two 
censorships; or the solemn purification which was supposed 
to follow the taking of a census; or the eighteen months during 
which censors were in office every five years. 

^35 



LUCILIUS 

426-7 

Nonius, 344, 34 : ' Meret,' militat . . . idem lib. XI — 
" Annos hie terra iam plures miles Hibera 
nobiscum meret." 

428 

Nonius, 181, 22 : ' Tenia ' dictum pro extensa ... — 
Hue iibi concessum pellesque ut in ordine tentae, 

429 
Nonius, 212, 7 : ' Latrinas ' genere feminino ... — 
qui in latrina languet. 

430-1 
Nonius, 394, 16 : ' Spurcum ' etiara fetidum ... — 
Praetor noster ad hoe, ' quam spurcust ore, 

quod omnes 
extra castra ut stereus foras eiecit ad unum' ! 

432-5 

Charisius, ap. G.L., 94, 21 K : ' Forfices ' et ' forcipes ' 
quidam distinguunt. . . . Lucilius etiam medicorum forcipes 
(licit libro XI — 



milia viginti. 



scalprorum forcipiumque 



*26 hie t. i. Palmer {Spic.) hie errat tarn vel incerrat 
tarn vel si77i. cdd. Hibera Palmer (Spic.) hiberna cdd. 
*28 hue Mr. hie cdd. consessum Dousa (F.) 
*3" ad hoc Mr. adhuc cdd. spurcust Mercier 

spurcus sit Mr. spurcos L spurcus cdd. 

<» Cichor., 39-40. On Lucilius' service with Scipio in 
Spain, see Marx, proleg., XXV', Cichor., 29 fF. (between 
139 and 134?) 

136 



BOOK XI 

426-7 

(6) On Scipio in Spain ; at Numantia (134-3 B.C.). 

Nonius : ' Meret,' serves as a soldier . . . the same poet 
in the eleventh book — 

" He has been serving many years already with 
us in the land of Spain.'^ 

428 
Winter quarters : 

Nonius : ' Tenta ' is a term used for stretched out ... — 
When they all withdrew hither, and the tent- 
skins were stretched out in lines, 

429 
Slack ways of the soldiery : 

Nonius : ' Latrinae ' (closets) in the feminine gender ... — 
who grows languid in the wash-bath.^ 

430-1 
Scipio expels all the filthy camp-followers : 
Nonius : ' Spurcum ' (dirty) also means smelly ... — 
To this our praetor : What a dirty face he's got 
because he has thrown out of the camp all those 
fellows to a man like dung into the open.'^ 

432-5 

Health of the army ? : 

Charisius : Some distinguish between ' forfices ' (scissors) 
and ' forcipes ' (pincers). . . . Lucilius in book XI mentions 
' forcipes ' even of surgeons — 

twenty thousand knives and pincers. 

* Scipio dealt suitably with this sort — App., Iher., 85 ; cp. 
[Plut.], apophthegm. Scip. min., 16, 201 C. ; cf. Cichor., 304-5. 

' Appian, Iher., 85; Livy, Epit., 57; Valer. Max., II, 7, 
1, etc. 

137 



LUCILIUS 

item paulo post — 

et uncis 
forcipibus dentes evelleret. 

436-7 
Nonius, 18, 14 : ' Rudus,' stercus ... — 

vial 
sternendae iaciendum hue aggerem et id genus 
rudus. 

438-9 
Nonius, 227, 33 : ' Torquem ' generis masculini ... — 
Conventus pulcher; bracae saga fulgere, torques 
t datis t magni. 

Cp. Non., 506, 24. 

440-2 
Nonius, 22, 29: 'Tricones,' morosi et ad reddendum 
duri ... — 

Lucius Cotta senex, crassi pater huius, Paceni, 
magnus fuit trico nummarius, solvere nulli 
lentus ; 

id est facilis. 

Cp. Non., 338, 11. 

443 

Nonius, 8, 11 : ' Tricae ' sunt inpedimenta et inplicationes 

Nee mihi amatore hoc opus nee tricone vadato. 

436 y[g^[ Mercier vim cdd. 

*^' sternendae Mercier sternendai Mr. sternenda et 
cdiL 

438-9 torquem datis cdd. 227 torques {om. datis) cdd. 506 
caelati C praedatis Linds. aurati M induti Mr. 
torques sat L 

**" paceni cdd. 22 pacem cdd. 338 Paconi Nettleship 
Panaeti Bcntin., D (F.) Udvaldov lun. panaethi Mr. 

**^ amatore lun. amore cdd. 

138 



BOOK XI 

and again a little after this — 

and that he micrht draw out teeth with liooked 
pincers. 

436-7 

He gives orders to push on with military -works : 

Nonius : ' Riidus,' dirt ... — 

for the laying of a level road they must bring 
here and bank up rubbish and rubble " of that kind. 

438-9 
The Celtiberi and the Nwmantines : 
Nonius : ' Torquem ' of the masculine gender ... — 
A comely crowd; there was a gleam of war- 
cloaks, and trousers and big necklaces.^ 

440-2 

//. On Lucius Aurelius Cotta,'^ consul in 144 B.C. ? 

Nonius : ' Trieones ' (tricksters) capricious {or ' morosi,' 
dilatory) persons and hard to get a return from ... — 

The old man Lucius Cotta, my dear Pacenius, 
the father of this fat fellow,^ was a great trickster, 
a taker of bribes, pliant for paying no one ; ^ 

' lentus,' that is, easy. 

443 
Nonius : ' Tricae ' (trifles, triflmg, trickeries) are hindrances 
and entanglements ... — 

I've no use for this lecher, no use for this bail- 
bound trickster. 

<* ' rudus ' means Umed stones. * Cichor., 306-8. 

" He was unfriendly to Scipio, and ruined by debts. 

^ perhaps L. Cotta, consul in 119 — Cichor., Rom. Stud., 77. 
Or possibly it is ' Cotta, father of Crassus . . .' or ' Cotta, 
father of this fat Pacenius . . .' 

« Cichor., Untersuch., 308-310. 



LUCILIUS 

444 

Gellius, XI, 7, 9 : " Non enim Lucilium " inquit " legistis 
qui tergiversatorem bovinatorcm elicit." Est autem in 
Lucilii XI versus hie — 

Si tricosus bovinatorque ore improbus duro . . . 

Cp. Non., 79, 29. 

445-7 

Nonius, 276, 20 : ' Damnare ' est exheredare ... — 
Cassius Gaius hie operarius, quern Cephalonem 
dicimus, sectorem furemque ; hunc Tullius Quintus 
index heredem facit, et damnati alii omnes. 

448-9 

GeUius, IV, 17, 1 : Lucilii ex XI versus sunt . . . idem 
infra — 

Conicere in versus dictum praeconis volebam 
Grani. 

In hac quoque primi verbi praepositione . . . producunt. 

Cicero, Brut., 46, 172 : Ego memini T. Tincam Placentinum 
hominem facetissimum cum familiari nostro Q. Granio prae- 
cone dicacitate certare. " Eon," inquit Brutus, " de quo 
multa Lucilius ? " Isto ipso ; sed Tincam non minus multa 
ridicule dicentem Granius obruebat nescioquo sapore 
vernaculo. 

**^ Quintus L inquam Quich. quem cdd. 
**' index cdd. index ed. princ. 

" bovinator means a cowman, cowboy, dawdler. Lucilius 
may mean ' blusterer ' here, for ' hovinor ' means ' I brawl.' 
On bovinator and tricosus see Landgraf, Philologus, LXXII, 
156-7. 

* Cichor., 314-15 (he suggests C. Cassius Sabaco); cp. id., 
Rom. Stud., 83. Cephalo = Capito; there is a pun on sector, 
cut-purse, and sector, purchaser of confiscated goods, the real 

140 



BOOK XI 

444 

Gellius : " What," he said, "you have not read Lucilius, 
who speaks of a shuffler as ' bovinator ' ? " And in fact there 
is in book XI of Lucilius this Une — 

If this tricky fellow, this brazen-faced shuffling * 
villain . . . 

445-7 
///. On Gains Cassius : 

Nonius : ' Damnare ' means to disinherit ... — 
Here we have Gains Cassius, an odd-job man 
whom we call Cephalo, this cut-purse and thief. 
Him does Quintus TuUius the informer make the 
heir, and all the others lose their cases. ^ 

448-9 

IV. On Quintus Granius the crier : 

Gellius : From book XI of Lucilius there are the hnes 
. . . the same poet lower down — 

I was wanting to put into verse a speech of 
Granius the crier. ^ 

In this preposition also — that of the first word (conicere). 
they lengthen the vowel. 

Cicero : I remember how Titus Tinea of Placentia, a very 
witty feUow, was having a contest of wordy wit with our 
friend Quintus Granius the crier. " Do you mean," said 
Brutus, " with him about whom Lucilius has much to 
say? " That's the very man; but Granius by some inborn 
flavour overwhelmed Tinea who was not behind-hand in 
making many a good joke. 

vocation of Capito ; and probably two meanings in operarius, 
' man of business.' index, judge, may well be right. 

" Siiss, H., LII, 350. On Granius, see also pp. 186-7 and 
190-1; Marx ad 411; Cic, Brut., 43, 160; ad Fam., IX, 
15, 2; de Orat., II, 244, 254, 281, 282; pro PL 33. 

141 



LUCILIUS 

450-2 

Nonius, 305, 23 : ' Fama ' est rursus infamia . . . unde et 
' famosum ' dictum est infame ... — 

Quintus Opimius ille, lugurtini pater huius, 
et formosus homo fuit et famosus, utrumque 
primo adulescens ; posterius dat rectius sese. 



453 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 231, 13 K : ' Puellus, puella.' 
Lucilius in XI — 

Inde venit Romam tener ipse etiam atque puellus. 

Cicero, de Oral., II, 277 : Quom Q. Opimius consularis 
qui adulescentulus male audisset, festivo homini Egilio, qui 
videretur esse moUior nee esset, dixisset : " quid tu, Egilia 
mea? quando ad me venis cum tua colu et lana ? " " non 
pel," inquit, "audeo; nam me ad famosas vetuit mater 
accedere." 

Cp. Non., 198; 15; 305,21. 



454 

Charisius, ap. G.L.y I, 240, 8 K : ' Mu ' pro mutire ... — 

non laudare hominem quemquam neque mu facere 
umquam. 

*52 dat vnlq. dare T da cdd. 

Cic. : ecilio cdd. Cic. {deest apud Non.) Decio M, 
Cichorius ecilia cdd. Cic. decilla Non. trib. Luc. lib. 
XI M Fortasse scripsit Lucil. : namque ad famosas vetuit 
me accedere mater 

*^* inquam cd. Colon. Dousae fortasse recte umquam N 
in quemquam exc. Par. trib. lib II exc. Cauch. XI D (F.) 

142 



BOOK XI 

450-2 

V. On QuinUis Opimius, consul in 154 B.C. ; 

Nonius : ' Fama ' means also infamy . . . whence ' famo- 
sum ' is a term for ' infamous ' . . . — 

The well knoAvn Quintus Opimius, father of this 
Jugurthine," was a man both graceful in form and 
graceless in fame ; he was both these at first when 
he was a youth ; but afterwards he behaved himself 
better. 

453 

Priscianus : ' Puellus' feminine puella.' Lucilius in XI — 

Thence he himself came to Rome, still tender, still 
a little boy. 

Cicero : When Quintus Opimius (now of consular rank), 
who as quite a youth had been spoken badly of, had just 
said to a cheery fellow Egilius (who appeared to be rather 
unmanly but was not) the following : " What about you, 
my dear ]\Iiss Egilia ? When are you coming to see me with 
your distaff and wool? " "Upon my word," he said, "I 
daren't. For mother has forbidden me to make any advances 
towards debauchees.^' * 

454 

A remark of Lucilius about this book in general : 
Charisius : ' Mu ' for ' to mutter ' . . . — 
never to praise any man nor to boo at him. 

" i.e. Lucius Opimius, consul in 121 B.C., bribed by 
Jugurtha in 116, condemned in 110, and exiled, cf. Cichor., 
310 fF. 

* Cicero uses ' famosus ' and ' adulescentulus ' (cp. fr. 450-2) ; 
the last words quoted are an altered hexameter; accedere (ad) 
is an especially Lucihan term ; — thus the attribution to 
LuciUus and his eleventh book is probable. The reading of 
the name Egilius is uncertain. 

143 



LUCILIUS 

LIBER XII 
455 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., II, 77 : ' Fucrit quodcumque ' 
. . . ' quodcumque ' vctusta voce mortem significari Luci- 
lius docet in XII — 

Hunc, siquid pueris nobis me et fratre fuisset 

hoc est si mors vel me vel f ratrem oppressisset. 

456-7 

Nonius, 513, 1 : ' Publicitus ' pro ' publice.' Lucilius 
satyrarum lib. XII — 

" huic homini quaestore aliquo esse opus atque 

corago, 
publicitus qui mi atque e fisco praebeat aurum." 



458-9 
1 

quibus fructibus . 



Diomedes, ap. G.L., I, 365, 4 K : ' DecoUo, decollavi. 
hoc verbum apud veteres ' decipio ' significat ... — 



me decollavi victus. 



460 
GeUius, IX, 14, 9 : ' Fames, fami.' . . . Lucilius in XII — 
" rugosum atque fami plenum." 

458-9 quibus fructibus me de | colavi victus M victus me 
decoUavi Mr. 



" Whether this is Manius Lucilius {Ephem. Epigr., IV, 213, 
Cichor., 1 fif., 19 ff.) we cannot be sure. 

^ Lucihus uses the word choragus, xoprjyos, the man who 
fitted out and trained the chorus for a Greek play. 

144 



BOOK XII 

BOOK XII 

455 

Lucilius and his brother ? : 

Servius (supplemented) : ' Fuerit quodcumque ' (whatever 
may become of me) . . . that ' quodcumque ' as an archaic 
expression means death we can learn from LuciUus in the 
twelfth book — 

If anything had become of us, me and my brother,* 
in our boyhood, this man . . . 
that is, if death had overwhelmed either me or my brother. 

456-7 
Lucilius^ father speaks of his sons'' extravagance ? : 

Nonius : ' Publicitus ' for ' publice.' Lucihus in the twelfth 
book of the Satires — 

" that as for me, I need some state-treasurer and 
outfitter^ who might provide me ^^ith gold on the 
public account from a state money-bag." 

458-9 
and of his own sacrifices ? : 

Diomedes : ' Decollo, decollavi.' This verb in the old 
writers means ' I deceive ' . . . — 

of these enjojTnents of living I detruncated 
myself.*^ 

460 
GeUius : ' Fames, gen. fami ' . . . Lucihus in book XII — 
" shrivelled and full of hunger." 

'^ Fiske 322 translates : — ' upon which fruits of hfe I have 
fertilised myself ' and takes them as words of praise of the 
poet to his teacher. The notice in Diomedes is imperfect, 
and Marx may be right in reading decolavi, in transitive sense 
{decolare is properly to trickle away through a colander) 
instead of decollavi {decolkire ' to take oS" from the neck, 
behead,' ' to rob '). 

145 
VOL. III. L 



LUCILIUS 

461-2 

Nonius, 363, 1 : ' Protelare ' . . . — 

Hunc iuga mulorum protelo ducere centum 
non possunt. 

463 
Nonius, 512, 21 : ' Firraiter ' pro ' firme ' . . . — 
" Firmiter hoc pariterque tuo sit pectore fixum. 



464 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 399, 12 K : ' Assentio ' et ' assen- 
tior.' . . . Lucilius in XII — 

Assensus sum homini. 



Diomedes, ap. G.L., I, 487 K : Liberalibus apud Atticos 
die festo Liberi patris vinum cantoribus pro coroUario dabatur, 
cuius rei testis est Lucilius in duodecimo. 



LIBER XIII 

Sat.l.t 
465-6 

Nonius, 216, 4 : ' Ostrca ' . . . neutri . . . (20) idem lib. 
XIII— 

Hoc fit idem in cena ; dabis ostrea milibus nummum 
empta. 

« Imitated from Homer, Od., IX, 241-2. 
146 



BOOK XIII 

461-2 
some huge 'person or thing : 
Nonius ' Protelare ' . . . — 

This a hundred yoke of mules cannot draw in a 
team.^ 

463 

Lucilius accepts advice from his father or teacher ? 
Nonius : ' Firmiter ' for ' firme ' . . . — 
*•' Let this likewise be firmly fixed in your 
breast." 

464 

Priscianus : ' Assent io ' and ' assentior ' . . . Lucilius in 
bk. XII— 

I agreed with him. 

an Attic customs : 

Diomedes : At the Dionysia, a holiday of father Dionysus 
amongst the people of Attica, wine was given as a prize * to 
the singers {i.e. the actors) ; of this custom Lucilius is a witness 
in the twelfth book. 



BOOK XIII 

Sat. I. ? Table-luxury and its cure. 

465-6 
Costly delicacies : 

Nonius : ' Ostrea ' ... of the neuter gender , . . the 
same poet in the thirteenth book — 

This same thing comes about at a dinner; you 
will present oysters bought for thousands of sesterces. 

* corollarium, garland-money for a wreath of flowers, and 
so, a free gift. 

147 
l2 



LUCILIUS 

467 
Nonius, 398, 26 : ' Sainium ' est testeum ... — 
et non pauper uti ac Samio curtoque catino. 

468 
Nonius, 151, 10 : ' Pasceolus,' ex aluta sacculus ... — 
adde Syracusis sola pasceolum . . . alutam. 

469 
Nonius, 204, 15 : ' Epulum ' generis . . . feminini ... — 
Idem epulo cibus atque epulai lovis omnipotentis. 
Qui versus utrumque designat, 

470-1 
Nonius 511, 18 : ' Ampliter ' . . . — 

nam sumptibus magnis 
extructam ampliter atque apte cum accumbimus 
mensam, 

472 

Nonius, 281, 14 : ' Dominus ' rursum appellatur convivii 
exhibitor; unde et ' dominia ' convivia . . . — 

Primum tollantur dominia atque sodalicia omnia. 

*^' pauper uti ac W pauperitiae cdd. pauper uti 
edd. coll. quae ex Cic, de Rep., Ill, in Non. sequuntur 

*^^ pasceolum ** alutam M pasceolum aluta C 315-6 
pasceolumque et alutam D (I.) (alutam ed. princ.) pasce- 
olum alutamen cdd. pasceolum optima aluta coni. Ter- 
zaghi 

*^^ epulai Mr. epulatio cdd. 

*^i extructaM apte arfr/. Mr. ampliter ac dccumanam 
L mensam ed. a. 1476 mensa cdil. 

'*"2 primum tollantur W tollantur post omnia cdd. 
toUant Havet Rev. d. Phil., XIV, 29 {seqnitur in Nonio Tur- 
pilius) domnia B dominia tW dominicfW. i primum 
domina (= dominia) a. s. o. tollant Mr. [ed. Non.) 

148 



BOOK XIII 

467 

served on costly table-ware : 
Nonius : ' Samiiim ' is earthen ... — 
and not like a poor man and on a broken Samian 
dish." 

468 
Costly dress : 
Nonius : ' Pasceolus,' a little bag made out of soft leather 

and besides these, shoe-soles from Syracuse, a 
fine bag, a leathern purse. ^ 

469 
A feast fit for the gods : 

Nonius : ' Epulum ' ... of the feminine gender ... — 
The same food and the same festive dishes in a 
feast of Jupiter the all-powerful. 
This line shows both forms. 

470-1 
Nonius : ' Arapliter ' . . . — 

for when we take our seats at a table garnished 
plentifully and suitably and at great cost, 

472 

A protest against table-luxury : 

Nonius : ' Dominus ' again is a name appHed to the giver 
of a banquet, whence also ' dominia ' are banquets ... — 

First let all masterships of revels and all fellow- 
ships be done away with. 

" or, ' not like a man poor and possessed of broken Samian 
ware.' 

^ aluta means soft leather; but in Juv., XIV, 282 it means 
a purse. 

149 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. II. ? 
473 
Nonius, 425, 6 : ' Fors ' et ' fortuna ' . . . — 
cui parilem fortuna locum fatumque tulit fors. 

474 

Servius auctus, ad Verg., G., IV, 25 : ' Inertem ' hie pro 
otioso posuit . . . quae vox ponitur . . . pro eo qui sine 
arte sit, ut apud Lucilium in tertio decimo — 

ut perhibetur iners ars in quo non erit uUa, 

Cp. Serv., ad Aen., IV, 158. 

475 
Nonius, 519, 2 : ' Multos ' . . . malos appellabant ... — 
unus modo de multis qui ingenio sit. 

476 
Nonius, 261, 3 : ' Cernere ' rursum disponere ... — 
Acribus inter se cum armis confligere crerint, 

477-8 

Nonius, 425, 6 : ' Fors ' et ' fortuna ' . . . — 
aut forte omnino ac fortuna vincere bello ; 
si forte ac temere omnino, quid rursum ad honorem ? 



*'* erit Serv.y ad Aen., est ad G. 

*'^ ingenio sit vel ingeniosa sit cdd. ingenues sit Mr. 
ingeniosust Linds. {rede ?) 

*^^ crerint L cernunt Francken cernit cdd. 

*^^ rursum L, Mr. quorsum ? ad honorem ? M cur- 
sum a. h. cdd. 



BOOK XIII 

Sat. II. ? The fortunes of man in peace and war ? : 
473 
Nonius : ' Fors ' and ' fort una ' . . . — 

a man to whom chance and Fortune have brought 
a like position and destiny. 

474 
The uncultivated man : 

Servius (supplemented) : He put ' iners ' here for ' otiosus' 
... a term which is put . . . for a man who is artless, as 
in Lueihus in the thirteenth book — 

as he in whom there will be found no art at all is 
called artless." 

475 

The rarity of genius : 

Nonius : ' Many ' was a term they gave to the ' bad ' . . . — 

only one among the many who may be a man of 

talent. 

476 
The test of war : 

Nonius : ' Cemere ' again means to arrange ... — 
WTien they have arranged ^ to fight it out among 

themselves in bitter conflict, 

477-8 

Victory by chance is not glorious : 

Nonius : ' Fors ' and ' fortuna ' . . . — 

or to win in war altogether through chance and 
Fortune ; if through chance and altogether through 
sheer luck, what again has it to do with honour ? 

" i.e. rude, vulgar, 

* cernit of the cdd. may be right (when he sees them fighting) ; 
but if so, Nonius is wrong in adding this quotation here. 



LUCILIUS 

LIBER XIV 

Sat. I. 

479 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 106, 24 K : ' Palumbes ' Vergilius 
feminino genere dixit . . . Lucilius XIV masculine — 



macrosque palumbes. 



Cp. Non., 219, 6. 



480 

Serv. auct., ad Verg., G., I, 129 : Non numquam pro 
fetore ponitur ' virus,' ut apud Lucilium — 

anseris herbilis virus. 

Cp. Paul, ex Test., 71, 28. 



481 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 79, 15 K : ' Caseus ' maseulini generis 
est ... — 

Caseus allium olit. 

482 
Nonius, 477, 5 : ' Manducatur ' pro ' manducat ' . . . — 
cum illud quid fticiat quod manducamur in ore. 

"0 trib. lib. XIV Shero, CP. XVIII, 130, lib. IX Fiskc 
382, lib. V Mr. 

^^^ alium olit M allium olet Lindemann allia oiens 
D (I.) alvum I molliet Stowasser W. St., XXVII, 212 
aula I mollis M ala molis cd. Col. ala molliet ed. pr. 
ala mol lit aut alumol liet Neap, alii alia 

^*2 cum cdd. tum Linds. num hilum quid satiat Mr. 



BOOK XIV 



BOOK XIV « 

Sat. I. Discourse on life in Rome. Simple living : 
479 

Charisius : Virgil uses ' palumbes ' in the feminine gender 
. . . Lucilius in (book) XIV has it in the masculine — 

and lean '' ring-doves. 



480 

Servius (supplemented); Sometimes 'virus' is put for a 
stench, for example in Lucilius — 

the poisonous stench of a grass-fed goose/ 



481 

Charisius : ' Caseus ' is of the masculine gender ... — 
The cheese stinks of garlic. 

482 

Objects of eating ? : 

Nonius : ' Manducatur ' for ' manducat ' . . . — 

when what we munch in the mouth has some 
result.'^ 

" A satire or discourse on Roman life is followed apparently 
by one on affairs in provinces and particularly Spain. 

* through ill-feeding. Normally the ring-dove is the 
fattest of its kind. 

<= Shero, C.P., XVIII, 130. Paulus says that a ' herbilis 
anser,' fed on ' herba,' was not so fat as one fed on grain. 

^ or, ' since he makes something — that something which we 
munch in the mouth,' 



LUCILIUS 

483 

Nonius, 230, 17 : ' Vulgus ' . . . — 
Dilectum video studiose vulgus habere. 

484 

Nonius, 220, 17 : ' Prosecta,' exta quae aris dantur ex fihris 
pecudum dissecta, sunt generis neutri. . . . Feminine — 

" eenam," inquit, " nullani neque divo proseciam 
ullam." 

485-6 
Nonius, 184, 12 : ' Viscus ' positum pro viscera ... — 
" Idne aegre est magis an quod pane et viscere 

privo ? ' ' 
" Quod viscus dederas tuquidem, hoc est ; viscera 
largi." 

Cf. Non., 470, 30. 

487-8 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 534, 25 K : ' Lacesso lacessivi.' . . . 
Caper . . . ' lacessi ' dicit esse . . . et profert exemplum 
Lucilii quo usus est in XIV — 

Num vetus ille Cato . . . lacessisse . . . 
conscius non erat ipse sibi ? 

Sed potest ' lacessisse ' per syncopam esse prolatam ' vi ' 
syllabae, 

^** proseciam Mr. prosiciem S [sequitur in Non. : Varro 
. . . prosiciem) prosectam cdd. (prosecam Lu.) 

485 aegre D (I.) aegri cdd. 

Prise, 534 K : Cato lacessisse f appeUari quod f conscius ; 
varia docti 

" Marx takes dilectum as a man favoured by the crowd; 
but cp. Housman, C.Q., I, 66. 

* or ' real meat.' What this fragment means or alludes to 
I do not know. cf. Marx, ad 474; Havet, Eev. d. Phil., 



BOOK XIV 

483 
Public distributions of food (' viscerationes ') in Rome. A 
mob gathers : 

Nonius : ' Vulgus ' . . . — 

I see that the common crowd is eagerly holding 
a levy.^ 

484 

complaint by one of the crowd demanding a ' visceratio ' ? : 

Nonius : ' Prosecta ' (cut off), that is entrails cut away from 
the guts of cattle and offered on altars, is a term of the neuter 
gender. ... In a feminine form ... — 

" no dinner," says he, " nor any cutlet offered to 
a god." 

485-6 

Nonius : ' Viscus ' put for ' viscera ' . . . — 

** Is that a worse trouble ? Or is this a worse 
trouble that I deprive you of bread and meat? " 
** This is the meat you had given us ! Give us 
a good dole of meats." ^ 

487-8 

allusion to Cato : 

Priscianus: ' Lacesso, lacessivi.' Caper says the past is 
* lacessi ' . . . and he adduces an example of it used by 
Lucilius in the fourteenth book — 

Surely our old Cato knew in his own heart that 
he stirred up . . . ? 

But ' lacessisse ' may possibly be a form uttered in syncope 
with the syllable ' vi ' cut out. 

XX, 65; Cichor., -325 fif. It is difficult to accept tu qiiidem 
in spite of Buech., Arch. lex. Lat. Ill, 145 and in spite of the 
two references in Nonius. Quod viscus . . . may mean 
' This is the worst trouble — that you had offered us meat.' 
Note also that hoc est might mean ' he is eating this.' The 
fragment possibly deals with a visceratio or public distribution 
of meat. 

155 



LUCILIUS 

489-90 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 215, 7 K : ' Hilum ' pro ' ullum ' 
vetustissimi proferebant ... — 

Naumachiam licet haec inquam alveolumque 

putare et 
calces ; delectes te, hilo non rectius vivas. 

491-2 

Nonius, 519, 1 : Veterum raemorabilis scientia paucorum 
numerum pro bonis ponebat ... — 

non panels malle ac sapientibus esse probatum 

1] TTaaiv v€.Kvc(T(Ti KarafpOLfxevoLcriV ai'daanty. 

(Horn. Od., XI 491.) 

493-4 

Nonius, 425, 36 : ' Antiquior ' melior ... — 

Quin potius vitani degat sedatus quietani." 
" Quanto antiquius quam facere hoc fecisse videri! " 

*^^ degas lun. 

*^* quanto D (I.) quamtu cdd. videri M vi- 

derist L videris D (F.) videaris cdd. 



" the game of duodechn scripta, a kind of backgammon, 
was played on a lined board {alveus, alveolus) with calculi 
{calces is here used to fit hexameter verse). Tyrrell, Herm- 
athenu, II, 365 thinks that Lueilius depicts a guest consoling 
a host for an accident at a meal ; life is chance ! cf. Shero, 
C.P., XVIII, 131. A naunuichia (vau/Lia^ia) was a sham sea- 
fight. 



BOOK XIV 

489-90 

Philosophical advice ; right living : 

Priscianus : Very old writers used to say ' hilum ' for 
* ullum ' . . . — 

Say I, you may look on all this as the game of 
' sea-fight ' or a game '^ with board and counters ; 
even though you may amuse yourself, not a whit 
the more upright would your life be. 

491-2 

seek the praise of the wise few, and a quiet life : 

Nonius : The ancients in their memorable wisdom used 
to employ the term ' few ' in number""^ express ' good ' 
men ... — ^^.^"^''"^ 

not to prefer to be thought honourable by the 
few and wise rather than " to be a king over all the 
souls that are dead and gone." '^ 



493-4 

Nonius : ' Antiquior ' better ... — 

" But rather let him pass a restful life in quiet- 
ness." " How much better than to do this is — 
being found guilty of doing. ' ' ^ 

» Homer, Od., XI, 491. 

'^ Here the second speaker prefers a life embroiled in 
poUtical affairs. Fecisse videri is a legal phrase used of an 
accused who has lost his case. 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. II. 
495-6 
Nonius, 533, 25 : ' Cercyrus ' navis Asiac pergrandis ... — 
" Ad regem legatus Rhodum Ecbatanam ac Baby- 

loneni 
ibo, cercurum sumam." 



497 

Servius auctus, ad Vcrg., G., IV, 387 : Carpathium mare 
inter Rhodum et Alexandriam appellatum esse dicitur a 
Carpatho insula, ut Lucilius — 

*' Carpathium mare trans vectus cenabis Rhodi." 



Porphyrio, ad Hor,, C, I, 7, 1 : ' claram Rhodon ' . . 
de qua et Lucilius sic ait — 

*' Carpathium Rhodus in pelagus se inclinat apertum.' 



499-500 

Nonius, 18, 24 : ' Nebulones ' et ' tenebriones ' dicti sunt 
qui mendaciis et astutiis suis nebulam quandam et tenebras 
obiciant ... — 

** Publius Pavus Tuditanus mihi quaestor Hibera 
in terra fuit lucifugus nebulo, id genus sane.** 

"' trib. lib. XIV Mr. 

498 trib. lib. XIV iMr. Carpathium Rhodus cdd. Rhodus 
Carpathium cdd. qua Rhodus M 

499 Tuditanus mihi Bouterwek mihi Tuditanus D 
(F.) mihi Bubetanus coni. M mihi turbitanus cdd. 
(tubitanus G., Flor. 3) 



158 



BOOK XIV 

Sat. II. Affairs in the provinces. 

495-6 

Journeying to the East : 

Nonius : ' Cercurus ' is a very large Asiatic ship ... — 
" I will go as envoy to the king, to Rhodes, to 
Ecbatana and Babylon. I will take a pinnace." " 

497 

Servius (supplemented) : The Carpathian sea between 
Rhodes and Alexandria is said to have been so called from 
Carpathus island, as Lucilius has it — 

" WTien you have been carried across the Car- 
pathian sea, you will dine at Rhodes city." 

498 

Porphyrio, on ' Rhodes the briUiant ' in Horace : Lucihus 
also speaks of it thus — 

" Rhodes island slopes down into the open sea 
of Carpathus." 

499-500 

Spain. 

A bad quaestor {attached to Scipio's staff ?) : 

Nonius : ' Nebulones ' and ' tenebriones ' (night-birds, 
swindlers) are terms applied to persons who throw a kind 
of ' nebula ' fog or darkness in front of their dishonesties and 
trickeries. ... — 

" Publius Pavus Tuditanus was my state-treasurer 
in the land of Spain, a son of darkness, a shady 
fellow, truly one of that kind." 

" The cercurus was really a small Cyprian ship. Marx 
thinks the speaker is Scipio Aemihanus on his journey 
taken c. 139 B.C.; Cichor. (324-5) argues for a legatio libera 
such as that of P. Scipio Nasica to Pergamum in 132. The 
mention of Babylon (by then a ruin) suggests, if not a sight- 
seeing tourist, an imaginary event. 



LUCILIUS 

501-2 

Macrob., S., VI, 4, 2 : ' Teucris addita luno ' ... id est 
adfixa et per hoc infesta ; hoc iam dixerat Lucilius in libro 
quarto decimo his versibus — 

" Si mihi non praetor siet additus atque agitet me, 
non male sit; ille ut dico me exenterat uniis." 
Cp. Serv. ad Aen., VI, 90. 

503 

Donatus ad Ter., Phorm., I, 4, 7 : ' Punctum ' pro 
momento ... — 

puncto uno horae qui quoque invasit. 

504 
Nonius, 481, 16: ' Libertatem uti ' pro ' uti libertate ' 

" quem metuas saepe,interdum (][uem utare libenter." 

505 

Nonius, 17, 22 : ' Gradarius ' est molli gradu et sine suc- 
cusatura nitens ... — 

Ipse ecus non formosus gradarius optimus vector, 

506 

Apuleius, Flor., 21 : Sibimet equura deligunt diutinae 
fortitudinis, vivacis pernicitatis, id est ferre vahduni et ire 
rapidum — 

qui campos collesque gradu perlabitur uno, 

ut ait Lucilius. 

^•^^ quiquomque ^Ir. iuvassit Sabbadini 
^°^ vector lun. victor ccUl. 
50« ex libro XIV? 



" i.e. Viriathus, suggests Cichor., 33-4. 
l6o 



BOOK XIV 

501-2 

counter -com'plaint of the quaestor : 

Macrobius, on ' Juno, hanging onto the Trojans ' in Virgil : 
* Addita,' that is, fixed to, and because of this, unfriendly. 
Lucilius had already used the word in this sense, in these 
lines of the fourteenth book — 

" If there were no governor hanging onto me and 
harassing me, it would not be so bad, but it's he, 
I'm telling you, and no other, who is disembowelling 
me." 

503 
Donatus : ' Punctum ' (point) for ' momentum ' . . . — 
" who ^ attacked every minute in the hour. 

501 
Nonius : * Libertatem uti ' for ' uti libertate ' . . . — 
" whom you must fear often, but must now and 
then be good friends with." 

505 

a {Spanish ?) horse : 

Nonius : ' Gradarius ' (a pacer) means making effort with 
easy stride and without jolting ... — 

The horse himself, not a shapely beast, but a 
steady pacer, an excellent mount, ^ 

506 
Apuleius : They choose for themselves a good mount, a 
horse of staying strength and lively nimbleness, that is to 
say vigorous in carrying a weight and quick in movement — 

who slips over plains and hills with one stride,*^ 

^ Cichor., 34-6 suggests that Lucilius saw Viriathus on 
horseback, perhaps at the meeting between Viriathus and 
Popilius in 139 B.C. The description suggests an ' Asturco ' 
(Asturian horse). 

•^ or possibly ' at one level pace.' 

i6i 



LUCILIUS 



LIBER XV 



Most of this book was taken up with setting forth certain 
benefits of philosophy (as taught by the Cynics and the 
Stoics?) though it is not easy to see the bearing of fragments 
which deal with one of Lucilius' favourite topics, namely 
horses. That these fragments came early in the book is 



507-8 

Nonius, 537, 5 : ' Paenula ' est vestis quam supra tunicam 
accipimus. . . . Lucilius satyrarum lib. XV — 

Paenula, si quaeris, cantherius, servus, segestre 
utilior mihi quam sapiens. 



509-10 
Nonius, 344, 35 : ' Meret,' militat ... — 

dum miles Hibera 
terrast atque meret ter sex aetati' quasi annos. 

511-3 

Gellius, I, 16, 10 : Lucilius ... in libro XV ita dicit — 
Hunc milli passum qui vicerit atque duobus 
Campanus sonipes succussor nuUus sequetur 
maiore in spatio ac diversus videbitur ire. 

... * Milli passum ' dixit pro ' mille passibus.' 

Cp. Macrob., S., I, 5, 7 ; Non., 16, 31. 

^^^ terrast atque L ac meret hie ter M ter sex lun. 
terras ac meret tersa ex cdd. aetate cdd. prob. Leo (genetiv.) 
aetati' L prob. M anneis Mr. 

162 



BOOK XV 



BOOK XV 

indicated by the sequence Nonius 537, 9 and 538, 2. 
Marx puts them late in it ; but this is due to his theory that 
Nonius or his slaves glanced through each book of Lucilius 
backwards. See my Introd. 

507-8 
(A) On horses {especially the breeds of Spain ?) 
What is useful ? : 

Nonius : ' Paenula ' (overcloak) is a garment which we 
put on over the tunic. . . . Lucilius in bk. XV of the Satires — 

If you ask me, an overcloak, a gelding, a slave, 
a straw-coat — I have more use for any one of these 
than I have for a wiseacre. 

509-10 
Experience in Spain : 

Nonius : ' Meret ' serves as a soldier ' . . . — 
while he is a soldier in the land of Spain and serves 
for eighteen years or so of time.^ 

511-3 
A Spanish horse compared with a Campanian ? : 
GeUius : Lucilius . . . in book XV has the following — 
No jolting clattering prancer from Campania, 
though he may have gained a lead over him in a 
run of a thousand or two thousand paces, will be 
seen following in a longer run, but will look as 
though he is going the other way. 

. . . He wrote ' milli passum ' instead of ' mille passibus.' 

"■ Military service in Spain was very much disliked by the 
Romans. The campaigns would be those which took place 
B.C. 153-135 during the Celtiberic War. 

163 
m2 



LUCILIUS 

514 

(Jellius, IV, 17, 3 : Item XV— 
^ubicit huic humileni et suffert citus posteriorem ; 
' subicit ' u littera longa legunt. 

515 

Nonius, 490, 23 : ' Holerorum ' pro ' holerum ' . . . — 
Tintinnabulum abest hinc surpiculique holerorum. 

516-7 

Nonius, 123, 28 : ' Incitas ' . . . — 
Vilicum Aristocratem mediastrinum atque bubulcum 
commanducatus conrupit, ad incita adegit. 

Cp. Nonius, 143, 6; 479,4. 

518 

Nonius, 22, 23: 'Stomis' {vel ' Prostomis' ?) dicitur 
ferrum quod ad cohibendam equorum tenaciam naribus vel 
morsui inponitur, Graece, aTro tov arofiaros ... — 

Trulleus pro stomide huic ingens de naribus pendet. 

^^* sufifert citus Leo sufFercitus cdd. 

Non. 22, 27 : postomis cdd. prostomis Linds. stomis 
Saumaise 

^^^ pro stomide Saumaise postomide cdd. an pro- 
stomis ? 



" The reference is probably to a horse. 

^ I take the meaning to be that this good horse needs no 
bcli hke a sheep to keep him from going astray nor dangUng 
bags of greens to make him move. 



164 



BOOK XV 

514 

Gellius : Again in book XV — 

He bends himself low to this rider and quickly 
brings down his hind quarters ; " 

people read ' subicit ' with the vowel ' u ' long. 

515 

Nonius : ' Holerorum ' for ' holerum ' . . . — 

Here there is present no sign of a bell nor of rush- 
baskets of pot-herbs.^ 

516-7 

A vicious horse : 

Nonius : ' Incitas ' . . . — 

He chawed up and made a ruin of the bailiff 
Aristocrat es, the odd-job man, and the cow-man, 
and checkmated them/ 

518 

Nonius : ' Stomis,' mouthpiece (or ' Prostomis,' twitch) 
is the term used for a piece of iron which is put in the nostrils 
or jaw of horses to restrain their stubbornness ; it is a Greek 
word and is derived ^ from ard^a ... — 

For a mouthpiece he has a huge basin ^ hanging 
from his nostrils. 

' ' Reduced them to a standstill.' On incita, see above, 
p. 36. 

'^ This is certain. But see next note. 

* By trulleus Lucilius probably means here a feeding-vessel. 
But it is not clear Avhether pro stomide is right. The ]\ISS. 
of Nonius have fostomis in the lemma, and postoviide in the 
quotation, perhaps rightly, for a glossary says postomis, 
iTTLOTOfjiis. Moreover, LucQius may be speaking of a horse, 
of a flute-player {i-maToyLis and arofxts, mouth-band), or of a 
tippler. 

165 



LUCILIUS 
519 

Nonius, 22, 7 : ' Cerebrosi ' dicuntur ad insaniam faciles, 
quibus frequenter cerebrum moveatur ... — 

te primum cum istis, insanum hominem et cere- 
brosum. 

520-3 

Nonius, 533, 11 : ' Corbita ' est genus navigii tardum et 
grande ... — 

Multa homines portenta in Homeri versibus ficta 
monstra putant ; quorum in primis Polyphemus 

ducentos 
Cyclops longus pedes ; et porro huic maius bacillum 
quam malus navi in corbita maximus ulla. 

524-9 

Lactantius, Div. Instil., I, 22, 13 : Lucilius eorum 
stultitiam, qui simulacra deos putant esse, deridet his 
versibus {epit., 22) — 

Terriculas Lamias, Fauni quas Pompiliique 
instituere Numae, tremit has hie omnia ponit. 
Ut pueri infantes credunt signa omnia aena 
vivere et esse homines, sic isti somnia ficta 
vera putant, credunt signis cor inesse in aenis. 
Pergula pictorum, veri nil, omnia ficta. 
Cp. Nonius, 56, 7 (526-7). 

530 

Nonius, 124, 17 : ' Inuncare ' quasi unco invadere et adri- 
pere ... — 

at qui nummos tristis inuncat. 

^23 navi in corbita D (I.) navis in . . . ulla cdd. 
navi e . . . ullast opus 7nusiv. Tunis, ubi v. 523 citatur ; v. 
2)p. 421-2 

^2' somnia L omnia cdd. istic omnia Mr. 

^^^ pictorum Lactant. fictorum M 

i66 



BOOK XV 

(B) Philosophy cures superstition : 

519 

Nonius : ' Cerebrosi ' is a term applied to those who are 
easily made mad, whose brain is often disturbed ... — 

and with them you first, you crack-brained man. 

520-3 
Nonius : ' Corbita ' is a slow and massive kind of ship ... — 
People think that in the poetry of Homer there 
are many prodigies which are make-believe monstro- 
sities, among the chief of which is Polyphemus 
the Cyclops, two hundred feet tall; and further 
his httle M'alking-stick, bigger than the biggest mast 
of any cargo-boat. 

524-9 
Lactantius : Lucilius, in the following lines," laughs at 
the silhness of those who think that images are gods — 

As for scarecrows and witches, which our Fauns 
and Numa Pompiliuses established — he trembles 
at them, and thinks them all-important. As baby 
children believe that all bronze statues are alive 
and are men, so these (superstitious grown-ups) think 
the fictions of dreams are real, and believe that 
bronze statues have a living heart inside. These 
things are a painters' gallery, nothing real, all 
make-believe. 

530 

(C) Philosophy cures avarice and teaches the simple life : 

The miser : 

Nonius : ' Inuncare,' to attack and pull in sharply as with 
an * unca,' a hook ... — 

and one who, gloomy of visage, hooks in his coins. 
" given in the epit. 

167 



LUCILIUS 

531-2 
Nonius, 2, 14 : ' Senium ' , . . — 
In numero quorum nunc primus Trebellius multost 
Lucius, nam arcessit febris senium vomitum pus. 

533 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 96, 9 K : ' Alicam ' sine aspirations 
dietam Verrius tradit, et sic multi dixerunt; quamvis Luci- 
lius XV— 

" Nemo est halicarius posterior te," 

cum asperatione dixerit. 

534-5 

Nonius, 537, 32 : ' Palla ' est honestae mulieris vesti- 
mentum ... — 

" Cum tecum est, quidvis satis est ; visuri alieni 
sint homines, spiram pallas redimicula promit." 

536-7 

Nonius, 445, 14 : ' Acerosum ' . . . panem farre minus 
purgato nee sordibus a candido separatis dicendum veteres 
putaverunt ... — 

" quae gallam bibere ac rugas conducere ventris 
ffirre aceroso oleis decumano pane coegit." 
Cp. Paul., ex Test., 96. 

531-2 multos titos lucios cdd. multost Lucius L nam 
(L) arcessit Mr. marcebat Dacier nam sanat L vdpKT} 
Onions narce saeva i(s) M alii alia narces{s)ibai 
cdd. plus cdd. pus Aid. 

"5 spiras pallam D (I.) 

^^^ ventri cdd. Paul. 

"' oleis Linds {qui el Olei = Auli coni.) oleo lun. 
olei cdd. decumano pane coegit T d. p. cumano 

c. cdd. 

t68 



BOOK XV 

531-2 

The viiserly Trebellius : 

Nonius : ' Senium ' . . . — 

Among this crowd Lucius Trebellius now comes 
easily first, for he calls up fevers in a man, and 
vexation, and retching, and festering. 

533 

Charisius : Verrius relates that ' alica ' was pronounced 
thus without an ' h,' and many have pronounced it so; yet 
Lucilius, in the fifteenth book pronounced it ' halicarius', 
with an ' h' — 

" No spelt-eater ^ comes second to you," 

534-5 
The miser's wife ? : 

Nonius : ' Palla ' (mantle) is a garment worn by a modest 
woman ... — 

When she is with you, anything vdW do ; should 
other men be coming to see her, she brings out her 
chin-ribbons,^ her mantles, her headbands. 

536-7 
Nonius . . . Old writers thought that ' acerosus ' was a 
term to be used for bread not well cleared of coarse meal, when 
the orts have not been separated from the pure ... — 

" who ^ forced them to drink gall-A\-ine, and their 
bellies to contract in wi-inkles through feeding with 
coarse wholemeal, with olives, and hunks of bread 
number tens in size." 

" So Cichor., 294; not spelt-grinder. 

* Thus in Juv., Ill, 208. Or possibly braids of hair — 
PUny, IX, 117; Val. Flacc, VI, 396. 

' It is uncertain what the antecedent of quae is ; it might 
be fames, paupertas, egestas or parsimonia, to judge from the 
remark of Paulus, from Test., 96, 3, on part of this fr. For 
deaimanus, see pp. 64, 168, 186-7, 192, 396-7, 

169 



LUCILIUS 

538-9 
Nonius, 213, 21 : ' Medimnum ' . . . masculini . . . — 
praeter quam in pretio ; primus semisse, secundus 
nummo, tertius iam pluris quam totus medimnus. 

540-1 
Nonius, 397, 25 : ' Sacrum ' etiam scelestum et detestabile 

Ac de isto sacer ille tocoglyphos ac Syrophoenix 
quid facere est solitus ? 

542 
Nonius, 536, 15 : ' Tunica ' est vestimentum sine manicis 

Scit TTOLYjTLKov cssc, vldct tuiiica et toga quid sit. 



543 

Nonius, 447, 5 : ' Ergastilum ' et ' ergastilus ' ut genere ita 
intellectibus differunt; nam neutro carceris locus est, mas- 
culino custos poenalis loci . . . 

non ergastilus unus. 

'^' pluris lun. plurcst Mr. plures cdd. 

^*^ ille tocoglyfos ac Roth illoto colfo sax cdd. 



*» which contained six modii. This fragment is obscure ; e.g. 
in 'pretio may be part of an expression in pretio esse, ' to be 
of value,' and primus, secundus, tertius, may all qualify 
medimnus. 

'> ToKoyXv(f)os, one who records minutely the interest on his 
loans (yAu^co, inscribe on wax tablets). 

170 



BOOK XV 

538-9 
The price of corn ? : 

Nonius: ' Medimnum ' . . . of the masculine gender . . . — 

. . . except in the matter of price ; the first 

modius was sold for half an as, the second for a 

sesterce, the third for more than a whole bushel ^ 

would fetch. 

540-1 
Tricks of the money-maker : 

Nonius : ' Sacrum ' (sacred; also accursed, devilish) means 
also villainous and hateful ... — 

But that devil of a money-grubber,^ that Syro- 
phoenician, what did he usually do in a case like that ? 

542 
Nonius : ' Tunica ' is a garment without sleeves . . . 
He knows it is ' creative,' he sees the difference 
between a shirt and a suit.'^ 

543 

Unplaced fragment : 

Nonius : ' Ergastilum ' (prison) and ' ergastilus ' (prison- 
foreman ? '') differ both in gender and meaning, for in the 
neuter it means the place of imprisonment, in the masculine 
a guardian of the place of penalty ... — 

not one foreman of a prison. 

« Or ' he sees what a coat and a cloak means.' I take this 
fragment as referring to the money-maker of the last fragment. 
He knows that his loans or his hoards are creative {ttoltjtlko.) 
of fresh interest (rd/cot). The reference to tunica and toga is 
clearly proverbial. Scit ttol-qtikov esse might mean ' he knows 
what it is to be creative.' 

"* the word more probably means a slave confined in an 
ergastilum. 

171 



LUCILIUS 

LIBER XVI 

544-6 

Nonius, 98, 16 : ' Demagis,' valde magis. Lucilius lib. 
XVI— 

Rex Cotus ille duo hos ventos, austrum at que aqui- 

lonem 

novisse aiebat se solos demagis ; istos 

ex nimbo austellos nee nosse nee esse putare. 

547-8 
Nonius, 201, 14 : ' Cubitus ' . . . neutri ... — 
Lysippi luppiter ista 
transibit quadraginta cubita altus Tarento. 

549-51 

Nonius, 422, 2.5 : ' Horridum ' plerumque extans et pro- 
minens ... — 

et 
hi quos divitiae producunt et caput ungunt 
horridulum. 

5*5 <:se^ solos ed princ. aiebat solos sed Gerlach alii 
alia 

^" istac L 

649-50 et iii ]\]; et ii (hii, i) cdl. hie {plur.) Mr. for- 
tasse hi et set Ribb. 



" There was probably one satire in this book, of a philo- 
sophical character, dcahng with hixury in the city and 
simphcity in the country. On the title ' CoUyra,' attributed 
to bk. XVI by Porphyrio, see notice on bk. XXI, pp. 194r-5. 

172 



BOOK XVI 

BOOK XVI « 

544-6 

(A) Tonni-life. 

A saying of Cotys : ^ 

Nonius : ' Demagis,' very much more. Lucilius in the 
sixteenth book — 

That famous King Cotys used to say that he knew 
these two winds, the south wind and the north wind, 
very much more than others ; but as for those 
gentle south winds made out of a rain-cloud, he said 
that he neither knew them nor thought they existed. 

547-8 
A big merchant-ship ? 

Nonius : ' Cubitus ' ... of the neuter gender ... — 

In this (ship?) Lysippus' * Jupiter,' <^ forty ells 
high, shall cross from Tarentum.^ 



549-51 

The new rich : 

Nonius : ' Horridum ' generally means standing out and 
prominent ... — 

and those whom riches promote, whose frowsy 
little heads riches anoint. 

* A Thracian, either the father of Cersobleptes (4th cent. 
B.C.), or the ally of Perseus but later reconciled to the Romans 
(2nd cent. B.C.). The fr. looks like the beginning of a satire; 
but cf. the excellent notes of Marx, ad 527. 

« on this statue, see Strabo, VI, 278 ; Pliny, N.H., XXXIV, 
39. 

^ sc. to Rome. 

173 



LUCILIUS 
552-3 

Gellius, IV, 1,3: Mundum muliebrem Lucilius in satyrarum 
XVI . . . genere . . . neutro appcllavit his verbis — 

Legavit quidam uxori mundum omne penumque ; 
quid ' mundum ' atque ' penus,' quid non ? quis 
dividet istuc ? 

Cp. Nonius, 214, 15 (legat u. m. o. p.). 

554 
Servius, ad Aen., 1, 703 : Feminino Lucilius posuit ut — 
uxori legata penus. 

555 
Nonius, 513, 1 : ' Publicitus ' pro publico ... — 
" Publicitus vendit tamen atque extrema ligurris." 

556 
Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 72, 30 K : ' Pistrinum ' . . . feminine 

media est pistrina 

ad tabernam referens. 
Cp. Varro, L.L., V, 138. 

557-8 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 87, 15 K : Vetustissimi . . . com- 
parativis etiam huiuscemodi sunt . . . usi ... — 

Fundi delectat virtus te, vilicus paulo 
strenuior si evaserit." 

*^^ omne atque penumque cdd. Gell. omm. atque cdd. 
Non. 

^^^ atque penum add. edd. vett. penus M 

"* trib. lib. XVI D (I.) 

655 vendis cdd. vendit Bentin. 

174 



BOOK XVI 

552-3 

Bequeathing one's possessions : 

Gellius : Lucilius in book XVI of the Satires used ' mundus,' 
as applied to a woman's toilet, . . . in the neuter gender ; his 
words are these — 

Someone bequeathed to his wife all the toilet and 
store. What is ' toilet ' and ' store ' ? What is not ? 
W^ho will settle that point ? 

554 

Servius : Lucilius put it {penus or penum) in the feminine 
gender; for example — 

the store bequeathed to the ^\ife. 

555 

bankruptcy ? : 

Nonius : ' Publicitus ' for ' publice ' . . . — 
" Still, he sells it all by public auction and you 
lick up the last leavings." 

556 
Description of an inn : " 

Charisius : ' Pistrinum ' ... in the feminine ... — 
in the middle is a pounding-mill 

referring to an inn. 

557-8 
(B) Country-life. 
The farm : 

Priscianus : Very old writers used comparatives even in 
this way . . . — 

" The goodness of your farm is a delight to you if 
the bailiff has turned out to be a little more active 
than usual." 

" Varro, L.L., V, 138 may indicate that Lucilius is referring 
to a building in the city ; but see p. 421 . 

175 



LUCILIUS 

559-61 

Nonius, 234, 37 : ' Aptura ' rursum concxura et conligatum 
significat ... — 

" Ibat forte aries," inquit, " iam quod genus, quantis 
testibus ! vix uno filo hosce haerere putares, 
pellicula extrema exaptum pendereonusingens." 

562 
Nonius, 201, 1 : ' Cepe ' generis neutri ... — 
** Hoc aliud longe est " inquit qui cepe serebat. 

563 
Nonius, 513, 14 : ' Ignaviter ' pro ignave ... — 
" Cur tam ignaviter hoc praesertim tempore quaeris }" 
Cp. Priscianus, ap. G.L., III, 71, 2 K. 

Censorinus, de die natali, III, 3 : Euclides . . . Socraticus 
duplicem omnibus omnino nobis genium dicit adpositum, 
quam rem apud Lucilium in libro satyrarum XVI licet 
agnoseere. 



LIBER XVII 

Sal. I. 

564 
Nonius, 134, 35 : ' Laverna,' dea cui supplicant furcs. . . . 
Lucilius lib. XVII — 

Si messes facis et Musas si vendis Lavernae, 

^^* si messes odd. et add. M semissis facient ]Musas 
D (I.) si semissis facis Musas L, Onions /or/a.s.se rede si 
messes facitis Mr. 

" This may be the beginning of a fable (Fiske, 167-8). Marx 
takes 'pellicula in the sense of foreskin ; how I do not know. 

176 



BOOK XVII 

559-61 

Story of a ram : 

Nonius : ' Aptum ' means also tied and bound to . . . — 

" There went by chance a ram," said he, " and what 

a breed ! How huge his cods are ! You'd think they 

were stuck on by scarcely so much as a single thread, 

that this huge load hung fastened to the outside 

of his hide." ^ ^-_ 

562 

The kitchen-garden : 

Xonius : ' Cepe ' of the neuter gender ... — 

" This is quite another thing," said the man who 
was planting onions. 

563 

an untimely questioner : 

Nonius : ' Ignaviter ' for ' ignave ' . . . — 

" Why are you so inept with your questioning at 
this of all times? " 

A double influence in everyone : 

Censorinus : Euclides the Socratic states that a double 
genius is attached to every single one of us; this you may 
learn from the sixteenth book of Lucihus' Satires.* 

BOOK xvn^ 

Sat. I. A parody and commentary on incidents in the 
Odyssey {with allusions to Roman life ?) 

Plagiarism : 564 

Nonius : ' Lavema,' a goddess to whom thieves make 
prayer. . . . Lucihus in the seventeenth book — 

If you reap harvests and sell poetry to Laverna, 

* We may take it that Lucihus himself stated this doctrine 
of Empedocles in this book as a hypothesis or a conclusion. 

'^ The fragments show traces of a parody of Homer, and i 
possibly of a satire on business-Hfe in Rome. * 

177 

VOL. III. N 



LUCILIUS 

565-6 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 475, 25 K : Lucilius in XVII — 
** Nupturum te nupta negas, quod vivere Ulixen 
speras." 

In hoc quoque subaudiendum est ' esse,' id est ' nupturum 
esse ' pro ' nuptum ire ' yayL-qQ-qaeadai. 

567-73 
Nonius, 25, 26 : ' Conpernes ' dicuntur longis pedibus ... — 
" Num censes calliplocamon callisphyron ullam 
non licitum esse uterum atque etiam inguina tangere 

mamniis, 
conperneni aut varam fuisse Amphitryonis acoetin 
Alcmenam atque alias, Helenam ipsam denique — nolo 
dicere ; tute vide atque disyllabon elige quodvis — 
Kovprjv eupatereiam aliquam rem insignem habuisse, 
verrucam naevum punctum dentem eminulum 
unum ? " 
Cp. Non., 26, 8. 

574 

Nonius, 371, 9 : ' Praestare,' antecellere ... — 
** Si facie fjicies praestat, si corpore corpus." 

5^' num 8 nunc cdd. ullam S illam cdd. 

^'° Helenam S Heram Onions Ledam edd. lenam 
cdd. menam Lu. \ 

^'^ Kovprjv M Ty^cu lun. piv cdd. 

^'^ punctum M dictum cdd. 

Non., 371 : Lucilius lib. XXYUcdd. XVII L 

^^* facie facies Escorial. facies rell. 

" On the use of the masculine form for the feminine, cp. 
Gellius, I, 7 ; originally ' nupturum ' was ' nuptu + erom,' 
' erom ' being the infinitive of ' sum.' 

T78 



BOOK XVII 

565-6 

Temptation of Pendoye : 

Priscianus : Lucilius in the seventeenth book — 
" Married as you are you deny that you will get 
married,*^ because you hope Ulysses is alive." 

Here also we must understand ' esse,' that is ' nupturum 
esse ' for ' nuptum ire,' in Greek yaixrjO-qaeaOaL. 

567-73 

Nonius : ' Conpemes ' is a term applied to people with 
long feet.* ... — 

" Surely you don't believe that any woman with 
lovely curls and lovely ankles could not touch paunch 
and even groin with her breasts, and that Amphi- 
trion's wife '^ Alcmena could not have been knock- 
kneed or bow-legged, and that others, even Helen 
herself, could not have been — I prefer not to say it ; '^ 
see to it yourself and choose any two-syllabled word 
you like — that a maiden begotten by a noble father ^ 
could not have had a mark of note, a wart, a mole, a 
pock-mark, one little prominent tooth? "/ 

574 
Nonius : ' Praestare,' to stand out (surpass) ... — 
" If she surpasses her, looks for looks, and figure 
for figure."^ 

, * it really means with knees bent inwards. 
\\ " Homer, Od., XI, 266 'Afj^Lrpvcovos aKoiriv. . 

^ scortum, whore ; or rtioecham, adulteress, v 

' Homer, //., VI, 292; 0(/., XXII, 227; cp. //., Ill, 
426; Od., XI, 23.5 {Tupcj Ihov euTrarepeiav. Thus Tupoj may 
be the right reading here for piv). 

f on this fr. of. Haupt, Opusc, I, 186. 

' This is the general sense; facie is dative, cor pore ablative 
of comparison, the missing word being pulchrius or the like. 

179 
n2 



LUCILIUS 

575-6 
Macrob., S., VI, 1, 43 : Lucilius in septimo decimo — 
Magna ossa lacertique 
apparent homini. 

Sat. II. ? 

577-8 

Nonius, 361, 27 : 'Proprium ' rursum significat perpetuum 
. . . (362, 9)— 

Cetera contemnit et in usura omnia ponit 

non magna ; proprium vero nil neminem habere. 

579-80 

Nonius, 6, 21 : ' Calvitur ' dictum est fnistratur . . . 
(7, 2)- 

" Si non it,capito " inquit," eum, et si calvitur." " Ergo 
fur dominum? " 



LIBER XVIII 
581-2 

Nonius, 544, 8 : ' Cadi ' vasa quibus vina conduntur. 
Lucilius lib. XVIII— 

Milia ducentum frumenti toUis medimnum, 
vini mille cadum. 
Cp. Non., 495, 38. 

^^^ hominis L 

679-80 endo ferto manum Carrio 

^^^ tu centum Bouterwek, Leo 

° Marx takes usura as enjoyment of Life's gifts. ' He lays 
out his all in enjoyment.' This may well be right. 

I So 



BOOK XVIII 

575-6 
Boxing-match between Ulysses and Irus ? : 
Macrobius : Lucilius in the seventeenth book — 

His big bones and muscles show up. 

Sat. II .? On business life in Borne ? 

A business man : 

Nonius : ' Proprium ' (one's own) also means perpetual ... — 

He wagers his all in a little money-lending," and 

spurns all other professions ; for to be sure no one 

has anything for ever his o^^'n. 

579-80 
Serving a warrant : 

Nonius : ' Calvitur ' is a term used for ' frustratur ' . . . — 
" If he does not go," said he, ** and if he shirks, 
arrest him." " Shall the thief arrest the 0A\'ner 
then?"^ 

BOOK XVIII 

581-2 

From a satire on gluttony ? 

Nonius : ' Cadi ' are jars in which wines are stored. 
Lucihus in the eighteenth book — 

You take away twelve hundred bushels of corn 
and a thousand jars of wine. '^ 

* Lucihus here adapts a law of the Twelve Tables pre- 
served in Porphyr., on Hor., S., I, 9, 76 ' ni it, antestamino ; 
igituremcapito,' andFest., 452, 6 ' Si calvitur pedemve struit, 
manum endo iacito.' See below, pp. 42-i-7. Lucihus calls 
attention to ambiguity in the wording of the law. 

« Imitated by Horace, S. II, 3, 111 flF. Fiske, 234. 

l8i 



LUCILIUS 
583 

Nonius, 113, 6 : ' Frunisci ' pro ' frui ' . . . — 
Aeque fruniscor ego ac tu. 

LIBER XIX 

584 

Nonius, 176, 6 : ' Singulatim ' et ' singillatim ' a singulis. 
. . . Lucilius lib. XIX — 

Sic singillatim nostrum unus quisque movetur. 

585 
Nonius, 396, 13 : ' Suraere ' etiam significat eligere ... — 
Sume diem qui est visus tibi pulcherrimus unus. 

586-7 
Nonius, 357, 33 : ' Olim ' temporis futuri ... — 
Sic tu illos fructus quaeras, adversa hieme olim 
quis uti possis ac delectare domi te. 

588-9 
Nonius, 358, 13 : ' Optare ' eligere ... — 
Aurum vis hominemne ? Habeas. " Hominem? 

quid ad aurum ? 
quare, ut dicimus, non video hie quid magno opere 
optem." 

58G sic Lu., G. si Gen., Bern. 83 
58'' ac D (I.) haec cd<l. 

588 hominemne Quich. <-ve> Corpet <en> D (I.) 

hominem cdd. 

" On this book Fiske, 230 ff., 246-7 is worth consulting. 
It contained perhaps one satire only; at any rate most of 
the fragments seem to be written in cynic-stoic tone upon 
the theme of contentment with one's lot. 

*• Housman, C.Q., I, 153-4. 

182 



BOOK XIX 

583 
Nonius : ' Frunisci ' for ' frui ' . . . — 
I enjoy things as much as you. 

BOOK XIX « 

584 

Individual feelings : 

Nonius : ' Singulatim ' and ' singillatiin ' from ' singuli ' 
. . . Lucilius in the nineteenth book — 

Thus each of us is stirred one by one, 

585 
Nonius : ' Suraere ' even means to choose. ... — 
Take for example the day which seemed to you to 
to be the very loveHest of all.^ 

586-7 

Looking to the future : 

Nonius : ' Olim ' of future time. ... — 

So *^ you too should procure those gains with which 
you may enjoy and delight yourself at home one day 
when winter rages against you. 

588-9 

Desire for gold ami other good things : 

Nonius : ' Optare,' to choose ... — ■ 

Gold or man/ which do you want? Take your 
choice. "The man? What is the man compared 
with his gold? Wherefore, as we say, in such a 
case I do not see what I should earnestly choose." ^ 

'^ sc. like the ant. 

** or simply ' Is it gold or the man you want to have ? ' 
* Fiske, 237 ; or possibly ' why I should earnestly desire,' 
or ' choose the man,' or ' make a choice.' 

183 



LUCILIUS 

590 
Nonius, 11, 20 : ' Passum ' est proprie rugosum vel siccum 

Rugosi passique senes eadem omnia quaerunt. 

591 
Nonius, 445, 23 : ' Multum ' et ' satis ' . . . — 
Denique uti stulto nil sit satis, omnia cum sint. 

592-3 

Nonius, 149, 27 : ' Peniculamentum ' a veteribus pars 
vestis dicitur ... e^ 55, 26 : ' Infans ' a non fando dictus 
est . . . (56, 5)— 

Peniculamento vero reprehendere noli, 

ut pueri infantes faciunt, mulierculam honestam. 



594 

Priseianus, ap. G.L., II, 542, 26 K : Alia vero in ' si ' 
desinentia supra dictam regulam servant, id est generalem 
in ' si ' desinentium — ' sensi sensum,' ' rausi rausum.' Undo 
Lucilius in XIX — 

rausuro tragicus qui carmina perdit Oreste. 

692-3 coniunx. M peniculamento v. r. n. Non. 149 ut 
p. e. q. s. Non. 56. 



" sc. gain. Fiske, 231. 
'' Imitated by Horace, S., I, 1, 61 fif. 

"^ Fiske, 238-244 sees in this a scene from childhood where 
the nurse is a respectable relation of the child ; if this is right, 

184 



BOOK XIX 

590 

Nonius : ' Passum ' means properly wrinkled or dry . . . — 

Wrinkled and shockheaded old men seek all those 
same rare delights.*^ 

591 
The fool is never satisfied : 
Nonius : ' Multum ' and ' satis ' . . . — 

And lastly so that nothing is enough for a fool, 
though all the world is his.^ 

592-3 

The following fragments refer to right behaviour : 

Nonius : ' Peniculamentum ' is a term used by the old 
writers for part of a garment . . . a^id ' Infans ' is a term 
derived from ' non fari ' . . . — ■ 

But do not seize by the skirt, as infant children do, 
a modest little woman.'' 



594 

Priscianus : However other perfects ending in si keep the 
rule mentioned above, I mean the general rule of perfects 
ending in si — ' sensi, sensum,' ' rausi, rausum.' Whence 
Lucilius in book XIX — 

a tragic player who is the ruin of his verses 
because his Orestes will be hoarse.*^ 

then, as Fiske suggests, the SchoKast's remark ' hoc nutricula 
sicca vetusta infantibus monsirat ' (on Juv., XIV, 208) may be 
a real hexameter of Lucilius and not an accidental one (Fiske, 
241), though Lucilius is not mentioned by the scholiast. 

•^ Because he will speak hoarsely in the part of Orestes 
{rausuro, ' inclined to be hoarse,' from raucio). 

i8s 



LUCILIUS 



LIBER XX 

Written in 107 or 106, this book contained a satire on a 
banquet, probably given by Granius in 107 (see Marx, proleg., 
XLIX for the attribution of at least one account by Lucilius 

Sat. I. 

Cic, Brut., 43, 160 {de L. Licinio Crasso) : Nisi in eo magis- 
tratu cenavisset apud praeconem Granium idque nobis (bis?) 
narravisset Lucilius, tribunum plebis nesciremus fuisse. 

595 

Nonius, 321, 17: ' Invitare ' significat replere. . . . 
Lucilius — 

pulchre invitati acceptique benigne. 

596 

Servius ad Verg., G., II, 98 : ' Rex ipse Phanaeus.' de 
Lucilio hoc tractum est, qui ait — 

Xto9 re 8vi'U(TT?/?, 
id est olvos. 

597 
Paulus, ex Festo, 50, 25 : — 

decumana ova 

dicuntur . . . quia sunt magna ; nam . . . ovum deci- 
mum mains nascitur . . . 

Cp. C.G., V, 566, 49. 

Cic. : trib. lib. XX M, lib. XI ol. 

"5 trib. lib. XXX Mr., lib. XX W 

"6 trib. lib. XX Fiske 

5" trib. Luc. Usener, lib. V Mr., lib. XX W 

" See note on p. 141. The second account of or allusion 
to this banquet may have been in book XXI or possibly 
XXIII. But in Cicero's notice (nobis) bis may be a ditto- 
graphy, so that there was perhaps no second account at all 
(Shero, C.P., XVIII, 128). 

i86 



BOOK XX 
BOOK XX 

of this dinner to bk. XX). It is probable also that there 
was another satire describing ships in a storm, but it is 
doubtful. 

Sat. I. 

A dinner given by Quintus Granius the crier to L. Licinius 
Crassus, tribune in 107 B.C. 

Cicero : Had he (L. Licinius Crassus) not dined during his 
holding of that magistracy at the house of Granius " the crier, 
and had not Lucilius related it (twice ?) for us, we should not 
be aware that he had been a tribune of the plebs. 

595 

The guesls are well entertained : 

Nonius : ' Invitare ' (invite, entertain) means to fill. . . . 
Lucilius — 

splendidly entertained and received kindly. 

596 

The first course (' promulsis,* * gustatio.^) ? : 

Servius : ' Even the king of Phanae.' * This idea is 
derived from Lucilius, who says — 

and our Lord of Chios, 
that is, wine. 

597 

Paulus : — 

eggs, number tens 

are so called . . . because they are big. For every tenth 
egg comes forth bigger than the others.'^ 

* Phanae was a headland of Chios, which was famed for its 
wine. 

<= Cp. the explanation of deciimani fluctus, every tenth wave, 
also given here by Paulus. That Lucilius is the source is 
indicated by Schol. on Luc, V, 672 giving decumanis fluctibus 
from ' Lucius.' The first course of a dinner usually included 
eggs. 

187 



LUCILIUS 

598 
Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 485, 19 K : ' Tergeo, tersi.' . . 
Lucilius in XX — 

Purpureo tersit tunc latas gausape mensas. 

599 
Gellius, II, 24, 7 : Lex deinde Licinia rogata est . . . cum 
et carnis aridae et salsamenti certa pondera in singulos dies 
constituisset, quidquid esset tamen e terra vite arbore 
promisee atque indefinite largita est. . . . Lucilius quoque 
legis istius meminit in his verbis — 

" Legem vitemus Licini." 

600 

Paulus, ex Fest., 38, 1 : Dicebantur ' Centenariae cenae ' 
in quas lege Licinia non plus centussibus praeter terra enata 
impendebatur, id est centum assibus, qui erant breves nummi 
ex acre. 

601-3 

Macrob., 8., Ill, 16, 17 : Sed et Lucilius acer et violentus 
poeta ostendit scire se hunc piscem egregii saporis qui inter 
duos pontes captus esset, eumque quasi ligurritorem ' catil- 
lonem ' appellat . . . qui proxime ripas stercus insectaretur. 
Proprie autem catillones dicebantur qui ad poUuctum Herculis 
ultimi cum venirent catillos ligurribant. Lucilii versus hi sunt — 

Fingere praeterea, adferri quod quisque volebat ; 
ilium sumina ducebant atque altilium lanx, 
hunc pontes Tiberinus duo inter captus catillo. 

59» ex lihro XX ? 

Paul., 38 : trib. Luc. M trih. lib. XX W 

601-3 trib. lib. IV J) {¥.), XX ca/ii. M 

" That Festus refers to * centenaria cena ' or the like used 
by Lucilius we may be certain; cp. bk. XXVIII, fr. 729. 
If Lucilius used the plural (e.g. ce/we centenariae), then this 
notice probabl}- apphcs to one of books XXVI-XXIX. 

* i.e. the Pons Aemilius and the Pons Sublicius. The cloaca 
maxima emptied into the Tiber a little above the Pons Sub- 

i88 



BOOK XX 

598 



Beitveen the courses 



Priscianus : ' Tergeo,' perfect ' tersi.' . , . Luciliua in 
book XX— 

Then he wiped the broad tables with a rough 
purple cloth. 

599 

The second course : 

Avoiding the Licinian laxu [passed between 129 and 105 b.c. ?) 

Gellius : Then a Licinian law was brought forward . . . 
which laid down fixed weights of dried meat and pickled fish 
for each day, and yet bestowed without distinction of kind or 
quantity whatever came from soil, vine or fruit-tree. . . . 
LuciHus also mentions this law in these words — 

" Let us avoid the Licinian law." 

600 

Paulus : ' Dinners called ' hundred-halfpenny dinners '° 

were those on which by a Licinian law, not counting food 

sprung from the soil, not more than a ' centussis ' was spent, 

that is one hundred ' asses,' which were small coins of copper. 

601-3 
Macrobius : But Lucilius also, a biting and boisterous poet, 
shows that he knows this fish of specially good taste caught 
between the two bridges, and he caUs it, as being a glutton, 
a*plate-hcker' . . . a fish that is to sa}', which hunted out dung 
very close to the banks. But ' catillones ' was properly a term 
which was habitually employed for those who, when they came 
last to an offering for Hercules, used to lick the plates. The 
lines of Lucilius are these — 

Besides he ordered to be made ready and brought 
to the table what each one wanted. This man's fancy 
was taken by pigs' paps and a dish of fattened fowls, 
while the other's was taken by a licker-fish of the 
Tiber, caught between the two bridges.^ 

licius; cf. Marx ad 1174; Shero, C.P., XVIII, 132; Siiss, 
/^., LXir, 352; Fiske, 410-411. 

189 



LUCILIUS 

604 

Nonius, 151, 1 : ' Praecisum ' et ' omasum,' partes carnis 
ct viscerura. . . . Lucilius lib. XX — 

Illi praeciso atque epulis capiuntur opimis. 

605-6 
Nonius, 201, 20 : ' Colubra ' feminini ... — 
" lam disrumpetur medius, iam, ut Marsus colubras 
disrumpit cantu venas cum extendcrit omnes." 

607-8 
Nonius, 427, 22 : ' Priores ' et ' primores ' . . . — 
" Calpurni saevam legem Pisonis reprendi, 
eduxique animam in primoribus oribus naris." 

609-10 
Cic., ad Alt., VI, 3, 7 : Tibi autem valde solet in ore esse — 

Granius autem 
non contemnere se et reges odisse superbos. 
C^.QiG.,adAtt., II, 8, 1. 

611 
Nonius, 18, 24 : ' Nebulones ' . . . — 
" nugator cum idem ac nebulo sit maximus multo." 

^"' saevam legem lun. saeva lege in cdd. 

^°8 primoribus oribus Suss, H., LXII, 353 primoris 
faucibus M fortasse primoris vel primoribus partibus vel 
primoribus naribus {Aid.) primoribus naris cdd. seclud. 
in Mr. 

609-10 trib. Lucil. lib. XI edd., lib. XX coni. M 

^1^ cum idem Mr. cuidem cdd. 

" With eating, anger, laughter, or the like. Shero, C.P., 
XVIII, 132; Siiss, H., LXII, 352; Fiske, 414; Iltgen, de Hor. 
Luc. aem., 21. The Marsi were famous for their skill in snake- 
charming. 

190 



BOOK XX 

604 

Nonius : ' Praecisum ' and ' omasum ' (bullock's tripe), 
pieces of flesh and guts. . . . Lucilius in book XX — 

They are ensnared by a cutlet, by the rich viands 
of the feast. 

605-6 

A guest speaks ? : 

Nonius : ' Colubra ' of the feminine gender ... — 

" Now he'll burst asunder " in the middle, now, 
as a Marsian bursts snakes asunder with his singing 
when he has made all their veins swell." 

607-8 
L. Crassus ? ^ speaks ? : 
Nonius : ' Priores ' and ' primores ' . . . — 

I found fault with the savage law*^ of Calpurnius 
Piso, and snorted my anger through the nostrils at 
the tip of my nose." 

609-10 
The host speaks : 

Cicero : But you very often have these words in your 
mouth — 

But Granius says he has no bad opinion of himself, 
and hates haughty kings. '^ 

611 
A rascal : 

Nonius : ' Nebulones ' . . . — 

" since that same fellow is a swaggerer and by far 
the biggest swindler ever." 

^ Marx, proleg., XLIX. 

*= Lex Calpurnia repetundarum, 149 B.C., for dealing with 
charges of extortion by officials in Roman provinces. 
** sc. of dinners ? 

191 



LUCILIUS 

612-4 

Gellius, III, 14, 10 : Lucilius ... in vicesirao . . . 
' dimidiam horam ' dicere studiose fugit sed pro ' dimidia ' 
' dimidium ' ponit in hisce versibus — 

tempestate sua atque eodem uno tempore et horae 
dimidio et tribus confectis dumtaxat, eandem 
ad quartam. 



Sat. II. 
615 
Varro, L.L., V, 23-24 : ' Terra ' ut putant eadcm et humus. 
. . . Humor hinc. Itaque ideo Lucilius — 

Terra abit in nimbos umoremque. 

616 
Paulus, ex Fest., 50, 25 : (' Decumana ' ova dicuntur) et 
* decumani ' fluctus quia sunt magna. Nam . . . fluctus 
decimus fieri maximus dicitur. 

decumanis fluctibus 
Cp. C.G.L., V, 16, 19. 

617-8 
Nonius, 536, 5 : ' Anquinae,' vincla quibus antemnae tcncn- 
tur. Lucilius — 

Armamenta tamen malum vela omnia servo ; 
funis enim praecisus cito atque anquina soluta. 

^15 trib. lib. Ill Varges, XX W abit Augustinus abiit 
cd. abit . . . <h> umoremque Kent, Trans. Amer. Phil. 
Assoc, LXVII, 67-8. imbremque cd. 

^^^ decumanis fluctibus Schol. ad Lucan., V, 672 ubi Lucil. 
trib. trib. lib. XX W, III Mr. 

®^' vela lun. velum Mr. vel cdd. 

^18 anquina lun. anchora cdd. {item in lemm.) 

" The meaning is not clear, but Lucilius was surely referring 
to the hours in the periods of recurrence of an illness. 

192 



BOOK XX 

612-4 

After-effects of a revel : — the quartan ague ? : 

Gellius : Lucilius ... in the twentieth book studiously 
avoids using ' dimidia hora,' and instead of ' dimidia ' puts 
' dimidium ' in these lines — 

(the fever wanes) in its own season and always 
at the same time — when three hours and a half at 
least have been spent— towards the same fourth hour 
as before. <^ 

Sat. II. Ships storm-tossed at their moorings.^ 

615 

A storm : 

Varro : ' Terra,' they think, and ' humus ' are the same . . . 
' Humor ' comes from this source. For this reason then 
Lucilius says — 

The land vanishes into black clouds and moisture. 

616 
Bough sea : 
Paulus — 

waves all number tens 

are so called because they are big. For . . . every tenth 
wave is said to be the biggest. '^ 

617-8 
Saving the tacTcle : 

Nonius : ' Anquinae ' are the fastenings by which the 
sail-j-ards are held. Lucilius — 

But I saved the tackle, the mast, the sails, every- 
thing ; for the cable was quickly cut '^ and the hal- 
yard was loosened. 

^ Even if my reconstruction is sound, the following group 
of fragments may belong to a story told at Granius' dinner. 

<^ The example decumanis fluctibus is from Lucilius, as is 
shown by Schol. on Lucan, V, 672. 

<* i.e. at my orders. 

193 
VOL. III. O 



LUCILIUS 

619-20 

Nonius, 546, 25 : * Carchesia ' . , . foramina quae summo 
mali funes recipiunt. Lucilius — 

<(fluctus) 
Tertius hie mali superat carchesia summa. 

621 

Festus, 382, 19, el Paulus, ex Festo, 383, 8 : ' RemiUum ' 
dicitur quasi repandum. . . . Lucilius — 

Suda ... ... remillum 

622 

Nonius, 490, 29 : ' Guberna ' pro ' gubernacula ' . . . — 

" Proras despoUate et detundete guberna." 

Cp. Marius Victorinus, ap. G.L., VI, 56, 6 K (. . . detendite 
et spoliate . . .). 

LIBER XXI 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., C, I, 22, 10 : ' dum meam canto 
Lalagen.' Id est carmen in Lalagen nomine amicam com- 
positum sicut scilicet liber Lucilii XVI (XXI ?) Collyra in- 
scribitur eo quod de Collyra amica scriptus sit. 

619-20 trih. Ill Varges, XX W 

«i» <fluctus> vel <nauta> add. W 

«2i trih. lib. XX W 

620 tertio D (I.), qui trih. lib. Ill Lucilius tertio : tertius 
Mr., qui tertio e Non. lemm. excidisse putat bine Harl., Par. 
7667, Escorial. hie rell. 

" This word, which occurs here only, seems to refer to a 
ship's sail bent by the wind in clear weather; or turned up, 
raised up. Cf. Marx ad 1303. 

194 



BOOK XXI 

619-20 

Nonius : ' Carchesia ' . . . the holes which receive the 
ropes at the raast-head. Lucilius — 

Then a third wave overtops the mast's scuttle- 
holes right up aloft. 

621 

Calm after storm : 

Festus : ' Remillum ' means as it were spread out . . . 
Lucilius — 

The clear spread out ^ 

622 

Larjing up the ship far repairs : 
Nonius : ' Gubema ' for ' gubemacula ' . . . — 
" Strip bare the prows and dismantle the helms." 



BOOK XXI 

Porphyrio on : ' while I sing my Lalage ' in Horace : That 
is an ode addressed to a mistress named Lalage ; I mean just 
as Lucilius' twenty-first * book is entitled ' Collyra ' because 
its theme was a mistress Collyra. 



* The manuscripts have XVT, but in the extant fragments 
of book sixteen there is nothing which suggests a mistress of 
Lucilius. Although Collyra may indeed have been the title 
of book XVI on the strength perhaps of one satire in it, of 
which nothing remains, Cichorius, 94, suggests plausibly that 
the true reading in Porphyrio here is XXI; of book XXI we 
have no fragments left. 

195 
o2 



LUCILIUS 



LIBRI XXII-XXV 



Books XXII-XXV were written in elegiac couplets, and 
dealt chiefly if not wholly with freedmen and slaves known to 
or possessed by Lucilius, who wrote little poems and epitaphs 



LIBER XXII 

623 

Gloss, cod. Vat. 1469, Goetz, Rh. Mas., XL, 324 : ' Abzet,' 
extincta vel mortua. Lucilius in XXII — 

Primum Pacilius tesorophylax pater abzet. 

Cf. C.G.L., IV, XVIII. 

624-5 

Donatus, ad Ter., Phorm., II, 1, 57 : An ' columen ' 
columna ? unde columellae apud veteres dicti servi niaiores 
domus ... — 

Servus neque infidus domino neque inutili' quaquam 

Lucili columella hie situs Metrophanes. 

Cp. Mart., XI, 90, 4. 



626 

Nonius, 210, 26 : ' Labea ' . . . feniinini. . . . Lucilius 
satyrarum lib. XXII — 

Zopyrion labeas caedit utrimque secus. 

^24 inutili vel inutiUs cdd. quaquam edd. vett. quoi- 
quam D (I.) quanquam cdd. prob. M 

^2^ Metrophanes additum ex Mart., XI, 90, 4 

196 



BOOK XXII 



BOOKS XXII-XXV 



upon them in their own dialect. The books were probably 
published after the death of the poet. (Marx, proleg., L; 
Cichor., 97 ff.) 



BOOK XXII 

623 

Pacilius {epitaph) : 

A Glossary : ' Abzet ''^ means ' put out ' or ' dead.' 
Lucilius in book XXII — 

First my treasurer Pacilius, a very father, a 's a 
cauld Corp. 

624-5 

Metrophanes {epitaph) : 

Donatus on a passage in Terence : Does ' columen ' here 
mean ' columna ' ? From this word comes ' columellae ' 
applied in archaic writers to the older slaves of a household 

Here lies a slave who was both faithful and in all 
ways useful to his master, a little pillar of Lucilius' 
house, by name Metrophanes. 

626 
Zopyrion : 

Nonius : . . . ' Labea ' ... of the feminine gender. 
. . . Lucilius in the twenty-second book of the Satires — 

Zopyrion ^ buffets his lips right and left. 

'^ An Oscan or a Paelignian word; cp. PaeUgnian afded. 
Pacihus is the Oscan Paakul. 

* This slave is probably the same as he who is alluded to 
in lines 362-3. 

197 



LUCILIUS 
627 

Nonius, 215, 2 : * Nasus ' . . , neutri ... — 
Nasum rectius nunc homini est suraene pedesne ? 

628 
Nonius, 149, 5 : ' Petilum,' tenue et exile ... — 
insignis varis cruribus et petilis. 

LIBER XXIII 

629 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 506, 24 K : ' Lambo ' . . . ' Iambi. 
Lucilius in XXIII — 

lucundasque puer qui lamberat ore placentas. 
LIBER XXIV 



LIBER XXV 

630 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 123, 8 K : Arabus Lucilius XXV— 
Arabus . . . Artemo 

627-8 coniunx. M 

^27 nunc cdd. huic B suraene pedesne L, Mr. -ve 
-ve lun. serene pedes cdd. (surene Flor. 3) 

«28 trib. lib. XII cdd. Non. XXII L 

" et petilis, end of a pentameter; or possibly read atque 
petilis, end of a hexameter. 
iq8 



BOOK XXV 

627 
On persons unnamed : 

Nonius : ' Xasus ' ... of the neuter gender . . . 

Now is the fellow's nose straighter, and are his 
calves and feet so too ? 

628 
Nonius : ' Petilum,' thin and meagre ... — 
a man marked by being bow-legged and thin- 
shanked." 

BOOK XXIII 

629 

Priseianus : ' Lambo ' . . . perfect ' Iambi.' Lucilius in 
book XXIII— 

The slave-boy who had licked ^ up the nice cakes 
too. 

BOOK XXIV 

No fragments have survived. 

BOOK XXV 

630 

Charisius : The form ' Arabus ' is used by Lucilius in book 
XXV— 

Artemo the Arab ^ 

* From lamho, lambere; but lamherat may be a present 
tense (verb lamhero) — Plaut., Ps., II, 4, 53 ; Paul., from Festus, 
84, 30 (to tear to pieces). 

•= Apparently a slave. 

199 



LUCILIUS 



631 



Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 71, 7 K : Si ' Aemilie ' ct ' luli 
dixcris, (Jraecc declinaveris, ut Lucilius — 

t tierei leontado et et pumone ethermo pulas t 



LIBER XXVI 

Written about 131 B.C., this book is the first of all that 
Lucilius wrote (see Marx ad 592-6 and proleg,, XXX ff.) 
Marx plausibly distinguishes three satires (see Marx, proleg., 
CXII — his order must be reversed); I have tried to trace an 
introduction and five other satires, or at any rate themes 
sketching some of the poet's views on professional life. The 
quotations by Nonius from books XXVI to XXX are plentiful 

Sat. I. 

632-4 

Plinius, N.H., praef., 7 : Praeterea est quaedam publica 
etiam eruditorum reiectio ; utitur ilia et M. Tullius extra 
oninem ingenii aleam positus et, quod miremur, per advo- 
catum defenditur — 

(ab indoctissimis) 
nee doctissimis <(legi me) ; Man(ium Maml)ium 
Persiumve haec legere nolo, lunium Congum volo. 

^^^ te ire Leonida uti, Numonie, Thermopulas M Leon- 
tiado C fortasse Lcontiada trib. lib. XXII-XXV W 

632-5 ex libro XXVI ? 

632-3 q\) indoctissimis supplevi ex Cic, de Or., II, 6, 25 ; vide 
infra legi me supplevi ex Cic, I. c. (legi velle) nee scribo 
indoctis nimis snppl. M j)ost nee doctissimis 

633-4 Manium Manilium C108 doctissimis Manium Persium 
Plin. Persiumve I\I 

<* The hopelessly corrupt text suggests a reference not to 
Leonidas, the Spartan commander-in-chief at the battle of 
Thermopylae, but to Leontiadas, who led the Thebans in 
that battle, I suggest that the line of Lucilius was a 
pentameter and have therefore put it in the group of 



BOOK XXVI 

631 
an allusion to Thermopylae : 

Charisius : If you say ' Aemilie ' and ' lulie ' as vocatives 
you will decline in Greek fashion, for example Lucilius — 

O Leontiadas . . . Thermopylae.'* 
BOOK XXVI 

enough to make the matter of arranging them an important 
one. Since Marx's theory of Nonius' method seems to me to 
be inferior, the divergence of my arrangements from his 
is much more marked than it is in dealing with books I to XX ; 
not only the quotations in any sequence, but also the separate 
satires or themes, where these are distinguishable, will be found 
in an order reverse to that of Marx. 

Sat. I. (A) Introduction ^ to his literary work {possibly 
not a separate satire) : 

632-4 

Pliny : Besides this we have a certain right to challenge 
jurymen publicly even in a court of scholars; the privilege 
is used by Marcus Tullius, a man placed outside all hazard 
as to genius ; he employs the defence of an advocate, and this 
is something we may well wonder at — 

. . . that I should be read by the very unlearned 
nor by the very learned; I don't want Manius 
Manilius ^ or Perslus '^ to read all this, but I do want 
Junius Congus ^ to do it. 

books XXII-XXV as being perhaps part of an epitaph or 
other occasional poem, even a literary exercise. 

'' On these frs. see Cichor., 105 ff., and W. Baehrens, H., 
LIV, 75 ff. <= consul in 149. 

^ C. Persius, an orator of high birth who lived in the 
Gracchan period. 

* Marcus Junius Congus, author of a legal treatise de 
potestntihus, and possibly of a historical work — Cichor., 121 ff. 
He died in 54 B.C. This is a difficult fragment. I have 
followed not Marx but Cichorius (105 ff., text on 108), adding 
more from Cicero. Cf. also Terzaghi, Lucil. Sat. Reliquiae, 
p. 36, and Baehrens, //., LTV, 7G-8 (another restoration). 

20I 



LUCILIUS 

635 

Cic, de Or.y 6, 25 : C. Lucilius, homo doctus et perurbanus, 
diccre solcbat nequc se ab indoctissimis ncque a doctissimis 
legi velle, quod alteri nihil intellegerent, altcri plus fortasse 
quam ipse, de quo etiam scripsit — 

Persium non euro legere, 

(hie fuit enirn ut noramus omnium fere nostrorum hominum 
doctissimus) — 

Laelium Decumum volo ; 

(quern cognovimus virum bonum et non inlitteratum, sed 
nihil ad Persium). 

Cic, de Fin., I, 3, 7 : Nee vero ut noster Lucilius recusabo 
quominus omnes mea legant. utinam esset ille Persius ! 
Scipio vero et Rutilius multo etiam magis; quorum ille 
iudieium reformidans Tarentinis ait se et Consentinis et 
►Siculis scribere. 

Cp. Cic., Brut., 26, 99. 

636-7 
Nonius, 165, 12 : ' Repedare.' Lucilius lib. XXVI— 
rediisse ac repedasse, ut Romam vitet, gladiatoribus. 

^2^ C108 Persium reicit id gloss, et scribit Gaium non euro 
legere Laelium, Decumum volo. 

^^® Romam bitat S Roma invitat Quich. R. invitet 
Onions Roma, ut vitet coni. Linds. ut Roma vitet cdd. 



^ Unknown. I have followed Cichorius, 106-8, up to a 
certain point, but I cannot agree with substituting Gaium 
for Persium (which Cichor. takes to be an intruded gloss) in 
Cicero's passage, whereby Cichorius makes the persons Gains 
Laelius and Decumus. 

" Thus I\Iarx ; Cichor., 108-9 and 23 ff. differs. I think 
the mention of Persius again by Cicero gives us a definite lead. 

" P. Rutilius Rufus, consul in 105. 

202 



BOOK XXVI 

635 

Cicero : Lucilius, a learned and most witty man, used to 
say that he wished to be read neither by the very learned nor 
by the very unlearned, on the ground that the one kind would 
understand nothing of him, and the other kind would under- 
stand perhaps more than he did himself ; of whom he went 
so far as to write — 

I don't care for Persius to read me, 

(for he was, as we have known, about the most learned of 
our people) — 

but I do want Decimus ° Laelius to do it ; 

(whom we recognised as a worthy man and not unlettered, 
but nothing compared with Persius). 

The following also seems * to belong to the same context : 

Cicero : Nor after the manner of our poet Lucilius will I 
refuse to sanction the reading of my works by everyone. I 
only wish that his famous Persius were ahve now ! Yes, 
and much more even, Scipio and RutiUus ''; it was in fear of 
their judgment that he says he writes for the people of Taren- 
tum and of Consentia and of Sicily.*^ 

(B) Married Life. Perhaps an imaginary discourse of a 
friend on meeting Lucilius when the poet was leaving Rome.' 

636-7 
Leaving Rome : — 

Nonius : ' Repedare.' Lucilius has in the twenty-sixth 
book — 

that he has returned and footed it back that he 
may avoid Rome during a show of gladiators. ^ 

^ It is quite possible that Lucihus had estates in South 
Italy and in Sicily (see above, pp. 30 ff.). 

« In this satire Lucilius seems to have expressed his opinions 
of marriage ; he was doubtless inspired by the cynical speech 
of MeteUus Macedonicus in 131 B.C. 

f Lucihus seems to explain that he does as other Roman 
gentlemen do, citing an example. 

203 



LUCILIUS 

Idemque — 
Sanctum ego a Metelloruni iam Anxiir repedabam 
munere. 

638 
Nonius, 88, 25 : ' Cribrum ' . . . — 
" cribrum incerniculum, lucernam, in laterem in 
telam licium." 

639 
Nonius, 324, 10 : ' Inpurus ' est aliquo vitio maculatus . . . 
" coniugem infidamque pathicam familiam inpuram 



doi 



640-1 



Nonius, 97, 5 : ' Depoculassere ' ac ' deargentasserc ' et 
' decalauticare ' . . . — 

" depoclassere aliqua sperans me ac deargentasserc 
decalauticare, eburno speculo despeculassere." 

^^■^ Metellorum iam Anxur Cichor., 137 5g'5'. sanctum ego 
a metello romam repedabam cdd. sancto coni. Linds. 

hanc turn L Antium Fruterius Roma rem M Roma 
iam B Metelli {seclud. romam) Mr. 

^^® in cerniculum Mr in telam cdd. forfasse et telam 

lucernam laterem in telam, licium Buecheler, Bh. Mxs., 
XLIII, 291 lucem in laternam vel in laternam iucem Mr. 

^^^ infidam atque Onions pathicam Ducbner placi- 
tam M flacitam ed. princ. elaticam Stowasser flati- 
cam cdd. 

Non., 97, 5 : depoculassere cdd. depeculassere Harl. 3 

^^^ depoclassere L. F. Schmidt depeculari W. Schmitt 
depoculassere Harl. 1, G depeculassere rell. 

^*^ despeculassere Schmidt depeculassere cdd. 

204 



BOOK XXVI 

And the same poet — 

I was at that very time footing it back from the 
saintly MeteUi's show at Rome to Anxur." 

638 
The frugal wife of old times : y/' 
Nonius : ' Cribrum ' . . . — 

" a sieve, a riddle, a lamp, a thrmii for the wool- 
ball and for the warp." ^ 

639 
The contrast of ynodern looseness : '^' 
Nonius : ' Inpurus ' means besmirched by some blemish 

" a . . . wife, an mifaithful debauched household, 
a defiled home." 

640-1 

Nonius : ' Depoculassere ' and ' deargentassere ' and 
' decalauticare ' . , . — 

" Some woman, hoping she will ungoblet,'^ unplate, 
unshawl, unmirror me of an ivory mirror." 

" Cichor., 1.37 ff. The Metellus referred to is doubtless 
Macedonicus, but the right readings are doubtful. Some 
take sanctum as the supine of sancire, ' in order to ratify some- 
thing.' It would hardly be an epithet of Anxur. I take it 
as a genitive plural. L. uses it probably in sarcasm, for he 
was no friend of the MetelU. W. Schmitt, Satirenfrag^nente des 
L. aus den Bilchern XXVI-XXX suggests that sanctum is an 
epithet of Alhanum nemus. 

^ Cf. Bucheler, Rh. Mus., XLIII, 291; Cichor., 135. 
Incerniculum can mean (i) a sieve or (ii) a stand on which 
flour was set out for sale. The meaning of laterem also is 
doubtful. Perhaps we ought to accept ^Muller's in cerniculum, 
and translate ' a sieve for the corn-stand, a light for the clay 
lamp, a thrum for the warp.' 

•^ or {'i) ' hoping I will spend money on goblet . . .' aliqua 
may be neuter plural. The form -assere is future perfect. 

205 



LUCILIUS 

642-3 
Nonius, 382, 41 : ' Rogare,' poscere ... — 
" Ferri tantum, si roget me, non dem quantum auri 

petit ; 
si secubitet, sic quoque a me quae roget non im- 
petret." 
Cp. Non., 366, 23. 

644-5 
Nonius, 360, 26 : ' Offerre,' invenire ... — 
" Homines ipsi hanc sibi molestiam ultro atque 

aerumnam offerunt ; 
ducunt uxores, producunt quibus haec faciant 
liberos." 
Cp. Non., 373, 2. 

646 
Nonius, 17, 32 : ' Delirare ' est de recto decedere ... — 

" qua propter deliro et cupidi officium fungor 
liberum." 

Sat. II. 
647 
Nonius, 351, 1 : ' Mutare,' derelinquere ... — 
Mihi quidem non persuadetur publiceis muteni meos. 

^*^ sic Gulielmus si cdd. ''^^ faveant Mr. 

^^^ cupidi cdd. cupide edd. fungor liberiim M 

fungo ruborum Lu. fungor ruberum rell. 

^*'' publiceis vel Publi utei Mr. pubUces Lu. 0. pu- 
lices rell., forlasse rede, cf. Smith, A. J. P., XXII, 44 sqq. 

<* molestia echoes the remarks made by Metellus in 131 B.C. 
on the nuisance of wives, but the necessity of having them in 
order to have children. Cf. Livy, E pit., 59; Schol. ad Hor. 
S., II, 1, 72. 

^ Cichor., 133-4. 

' delirare means to leave the balk {lira, ridge or balk 
between two furrows). 
2o6 



BOOK XXVI 

642-3 

Nonius : ' Rogare ' to ask for ... — 

" If she should ask me, I wouldn't give her as much 
iron as the gold she's trying to get; should she 
sleep alone, not even thus would she get from me 
what she asks." 

644-5 

The nuisance of marriage : 

Nonius : ' Offerre ' to come upon ... — 

" Men provide this irksomeness " and hardship for 
themselves of their own accord — they get wives and 
beget children, so that for their sake they may do 
all this that I've said." ^ 

646 

Begetting children : 

Nonius : ' Delirare ' means to depart from the straight 
line ... — 

" wherefore do I go off the rails '^ and do the duty 
of a man eager for children." '^ 

Sat. IT. The troubles of men of business and of men of 
fashion.^ (a) Business life : Lucilius will keep his estates. 

647 
Nonius : ' Mutare,' to leave utterly ... — 

I at any rate won't be persuaded to give my own 
fields in exchange for farmed state-revenues./ 

^ i.e. we must marry, mad though the thought is. Here 
again LuciHus consciously maintains the attitude of Metellus. 
(Cf. note on Hnes 644-5.) But it may be that cupide should 
he read and liberum taken not as a gen. pi. but as an adj. ace. 
sing. : " eagerly perform a free part." 

* Lucihus seems to reject both these ways of living by- 
illustrating them. 

Stoic idea. Cp. Cichor., 75. Marx thinks agris is to 
be understood. But cf. lines 650-1. By using mutare L. 
means perhaps simply exchange. 

207 



LUCILIUS 

648-9 

Nonius, 351, 3 : ' Mutarc,' transferre ... — 

" Doctior quam cetcri 
sis ; has mutes aliquo f tecum t sartas tectas ditias." 

650-1 
Nonius, 351, 6 : ' Mutare,' aliud pro alio accipere ... — 

Publicanus vero ut Asiae fiam, ut scripturarius 
pro Lucilio, id ego nolo et uno hoc non muto omnia. 
Cp. Non., 38, 4. 

652-3 

Nonius, 38, 5 : ' Versipelles ' dicti sunt quolibct genere se 
commutantes ... — 

At libertinus tricorius Syrus ipse ac mastigias 
quicum versipelUs fio et quicum conmuto omnia. 

654 

Nonius, 97, 9 : ' Difflare ' . . . — 
Pars difflatur vento, pars autem obrigescit frigore. 

^** sis; has Linds. et vel ac Mr. si asa vel sa cdd. 

mutes Quich. mittis mutes cdd. sartas tectas ditias 
Duentzer (factas co?ii. Linds.) fortasse ditiviS, turn sacra 
face a via L ab amicis mutes aliquo te cum satias facta 
sit M satra facta vitia Lu. G. satrafa acutia Bamh., 
Gen. 

^5° fiam ut s. cdd. 38 fiam s. cdd. 351 aut Onions 

^^2 fortasse tricosus 

" For the Latin expression, cf. Fest., 472, 19 {sarta tecta, 
buildings in good repair); Cic, Verr., II, 12, 50, 130, etc. 
But this fragment is very uncertain. 

208 



BOOK XXM 

648-9 

Nonius : ' Mutare,' to convey ... — 

" Be wiser than the others ; see that you exchange 
for something these your riches ' covered and in 
good repair.' " '^ 

650-1 

i\'o tax-farming for lAicilius : 

Nonius : ' Mutare,' to receive one thing for another . . . 

But to become a tax-farmer of Asia, a collector of 
pasture-taxes, instead of Lucilius — that I don't want; 
in exchange for what I am — for this alone of all 
thinojs I'm not taking the whole world. ^ 

652-3 
An unscrupulous agent : 

Nonius : ' Versipellis ' is a term applied to those who 
change themselves into any kind of thing ... — • 

But he is a freedman, a rascal thick-skinned '^ 
thrice over, a very Syrian, yea a rogue, with whom I 
change my skin, with whom I exchange everything. 

654 
Business on my estate is very had : 
Nonius : ' Difflare ' . . . — 

Part of it is blown away by the wind, while part is 
frozen stiff by the frost. 

^ Cichor., 72 ff., Baehrens, H., LIV, 81. Again the Stoic 
idea. In another reference to this passage, Nonius (38, 4) 
takes scripturarius as tabellarius, a keeper of archives, a 
registrar. 

" Or ' Tricorius ', a member of a tribe in Gallia Narbonensis 
(Livy, XXI, 31) ? Whatever the context of this fragment the 
reference is to an agent, of the freedman or a like class, between 
the tax-farmer and his Asiatic business. ' Versipellis ' con- 
tains the idea of craftiness, a ' shuffler.' 

209 

VOL. III. P 



LUGILIUS 

655 

Nonius, 521, 1 : ' Proventura ' etiam malarura rerum dici 
veteres voluerunt ... — 

denique adeo male me accipiunt decimae et proveni- 
imt male, 

656 
Nonius, 272, 27 : ' Constat,' valet ... — 
Trado ergo alias nummo porro, quod mihi constat 
carius. 

657 

Nonius, 23, 9 : ' Moenes ' apud veteres. . . . Lucilius lib. 
XXVI— 

Munifici comesque amicis nostris videamur viri. 

658 
Nonius, 38, 1 : ' Conbibones,' conpotores, a bibendo dicti 

quandoquidem reperti magnis conbibonum ex 
copiis ... 

659 

Nonius, 525, 18 : Quotiens per accusativum casum annos 
vel dies loquimur, iugcs annos vel dies significamus . . . 
(526, 14)— 

qui sex menses vitam ducunt, Oreo spondent 
septimum. 

Cp. Non. 283, 27. 

^5® aliis L alias cdd. prob. 'M 

^^^ reperti vel res periit Mr. (res periit Quich., L) rep- 
perii M repperi cdd. 

210 



BOOK XXVI 

655 

Nonius : ' Proventus ' is a term by wliich the old writers 
meant to express even bad fortune ... — 

to put it shortly, the tithes " give me such a bad 
time and are turning out so badly. 

656 

Nonius : ' Constat,' is valued ... — 

Therefore that which is a too costly business for 
me to keep I'll for the future deliver by sale else- 
where for a shilling. 

657 

(b) Men of fashion. 

Boon companions : 

Nonius : ' ^loenes ' is a term which was used by the old 
writers. . . . Lucilius in bk. XXVI has ' munifici' — 

Let us appear to our friends generous givers and 
good fellows. 

658 

Nonius : ' Conbibones',' drinkers together, a term derived 
from ' bibere ' . . . — 

since to be sure, found among great crowds of 
fellow-tipplers. . . . 

659 

The road to ruin : 

Nonius : Whenever we speak of years or days in the 
accusative case, we mean years or days continually ... — 

who drag out life for six months, and pledge the 
seventh with Death. ^ 

« These refer to the tithes tribute of the province of Sicily 
(where Lucihus held estates?) not to Asia where they were 
not a cause of trouble until 123 B.C. But cf. also Cichor., 
102-3. 

* Cichor., 175; Baehrens, H., LIV, 79. Adapted from 
Caecilius — see Remains of Old Latin, Vol. I, 490-1. 

211 

p2 



LUCILIUS 

660-1 

Nonius, 260, 1 : ' Conficerc,' colligere ... — 

Nonne multitudincm 
tiiorum qiiam in album indidit tua dextra confecit 
sibi ? 

662 
Nonius, 158, 18 : ' Monlicus ' , . . — 

mordicus petere aurum e flamma expediat, e caeno 
cibum. 

663 

Nonius, 2.54, 1 : ' Capere,' accipere ... — 
Malisne esse? Lautum e mensa, puere, capturu's 
cibum ? 
Cp. Nonius, 337, 14. 

664 
Nonius, 38, 13 : ' Capital ' dictum est capitis periculum 

Facile deridemur ; scimus capital esse irascier. 

^^° nonne Duebner nocte coni. Linds. non te cdd. 

^^^ indidit tua dextra Linds. indidisti dextra Duebner 
indidit a dextera cdd. (indit Lu. 1) confecit sibi Linds. 

confeci tibi Duebner conficis dextra tibi Mr. quara in 
alvum indidi ista dextra confecisse ibi coni. M indidisti 
dextram {i.e. propitiam) conficis tibi Terzaghi conficis 
ibi cdd. 

**^ malisne Linds. malis nee si Leo malis necesse 
cdd. 254 m. n. est cdd. 337 fortasse lautus purae 

cdd. 254 pure cdd. 337 fortasse pura 

212 



BOOK XXM 

660-1 
Nonius : ' Conficere,' to collect ... — 

Has he not picked up for himself a crowd of those 
friends of yours which your right hand has entered 
in your register ? '^ 

662 

Miserliness ? : 

Xonius : ' Mordicus ' . . . — 

it may be worth while to pick out with the teeth 
gold from flame, food from hlth.^ 

663 

Addressed to a hoy ? : 

Nonius : ' Capere,' to receive ... — 

Would you rather eat ? Boy, are you going to 
take good clean food from a table ? '^ 

664 

Lucilius ^ does not mind derision : 

Nonius : ' Capital ' is a term used of disaster to the person 
(' caput ') . . . — 

We take a laugh against us with an easy temper ; 
we know that to lose our temper is a capital crime. 

" The readings and the sense are alike doubtful. 

* Miserliness ? or the Cynic-Stoic rule of simple diet ? 
Cf. Marx, pp. 240-1. 

" The meaning is not clear. The sense may not be complete. 
' Tinalisne esse ' — ' would you prefer to he . . . \?) ' to eat icith 
your jaws ' ( ? hardly). Read perhaps pure and construe it 
with lautuni (so Marx), or pura (sc. mensa). 

^ Marx thinks that this is the complaint of some parasite. 

213 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. III. 
665 
Nonius, 74, 21 : ' Avernincare,' avertere ... — 
" Di monerint meliora, amentiam averruncassint 
tuam ! " 

666 
Nonius, 88, 27 : ' Contemnificum ' . . . — 
Ego enim contemnificus fieri et fastidire Agamem- 
nonis. 

667-8 

Nonius, 158, 11 : ' Prospcrari ' . . . 
Nec Minervae prosperatur pax quod Cassandram 

signo deripuit. 

669 
Nonius, 297, 14 : ' EfFerre,' subdere ... — 
Depugnabunt pro te ipsi et morientur ac se ultro 
efferent. 

^^^ monerint edd. minuerint cdd. 

^^^ Minervae ei Onions homini mea Leo minima ei 
Mr. nec minimo est nec vel nec minimo ei ^I minimo 
et cdd. seel, et Linds. post Cassandram suppl. suo 

Onions deae Quich. Mr. saevo B Locrus M 

669 ofiFerent Passerat 



« Cp. Cichor., 127 ff. 

^ Lucilius' critic here parodies the tragic diction of Pacuvius 
(in Chryses) by quoting a line (one word short); for this, see 
Remains of Old Latin, Vol. II, pp. 206-77. The true meanings 
of the old words verrunco and averrunco are not known. But 
the words mean something stronger than Nonius implies. 
Perhaps from verrere to sweep and rancare to hoc or plane off. 

214 



BOOK XXVI 

Sat. III. On loriting tragic 'poetry.'^ 

665 

Nonius : ' Averruncare,' to turn aside (literally ' to sweep 
and hoe away ' ?) . . . — 

" May the gods advise you better things, and root 
out this your madness ! " ^ 

666 
Lucilius admits Ms fault ? : 
Nonius : ' Contemnificum ' . . . — 

For I become contemnifical and despise Aga- 
memnon/ 

667-8 
Nonius : ' Prosperari ' . . . — 

Nor was Minerva's favour 
propitiated ; for he dragged Cassandra away from the 
statue.'^ 

669 
Nonius : ' Efferre,' to submit (or substitute) «... — 

They vnW fight it out in person, will die and 
actually make their own funerals for your sake. 

« Lucilius retorts in like style. In Chryses of Pacuvius 
there was perhaps a quarrel between Achilles and Agamemnon 
over Chrj-seis. Cf. Fiske, T.A.P., XL, 131. 

^ i.e. Ajax, son of Oileus, dragged Cassandra away from the 
statue of Pallas. Again probably a hit at Pacuvius' Chryses : 
see last two notes. If jMinerva is right, the reference is to the 
anger of Athene (Homer, Od., IV, 499, Virg., Aen., I, 40). 

« Nonius is wrong, unless subdere can mean ' to bury,' 
' lay out,' or afferent is read for efferent in the quotation from 
Lucilius. But efferre in the lemma (in a group of which all 
begin with e) forbids this. 

215 



LUCILIUS 

670-1 

Nonius, 297, 16 : ' Efferre ' significat proferre ... — 
Ego ubi quern ex praecordiis 
ecfero versum, 

672-3 

Nonius, 38, 17 : ' Clandestino ' est absconditc ... — 
At enim dicis " clandestino tibi quod conmisum foret, 
neu muttires quidquam neu mysteria ecferres foras." 

Cp. Non., 249, 15. 

674 
Nonius, 38, 20 : ' Idiotas ' a Graeco tractura, inutiles . . . — 
Quidni ? Et tu idem inlitteratum me atque idiotam 
diceres. 

675 

Nonius, 359, 2 : ' Ofifendere,' in venire ... — 
siquod verbum inusitatum aut zetematium offen- 
deram. 

Sat. IV. 
676-7 
Nonius, 272, 41 : ' Constat,' conpositum est ... — 
Principio physici omnes constare hominem ex ani- 

ma et corpore 
dicunt. 

^''^ foriasse muteires (Linds.) mitt ere cdd. 38 

" Marx connects this fragment with the introductory 
fragments (see above); but the order in Nonius forbids this. 
Ex praecordiis perhaps means simpl}' 'out of natural fcehng.' 

2t6 



BOOK XXVI 

670-1 

Letting out secrets in satires ? : 

Nonius : ' Efferre ' means to bring out ... — 

When I bring forth any line out of my very heart,'* 

672-3 

Nonius : ' Clandestine ' means in a hidden manner ... — 

But, let us suppose, you say : " about that which 

was entrusted to you in secret you ought not to have 

muttered a word ; you ought not to have spread the 

secret abroad." 

674 

Nonius : ' Idiotae,' a term borrowed from the Greek, means 
useless people ... — 

Why not ? Besides, you again would say I was un- 
lettered and a common fellow.''^ 

675 
Nonius : ' Offendere,' to come upon ... — 
if I had hit upon some unusual word or a petty 
problem.*^ 

Sat. IV. On certain teachings of the Cynics and the Stoics.'^ 

676-7 
What man is made of : 

Nonius : ' Constat,' has been composed ... — 
In the first place all the natural pliilosophers say 
that man is made up of soul and body. 

* On this fragment and the next see Cichor., 127-8 ; Fiske, 
456, 473, n. 64 and id., Harv. Stud., XXIV, 6. Punctuate 
perhaps: Quidni et . . . diceres ? 

' l,r]TT]fxdTLov = qnaestiuncula. 

<^ Fiske, 436 ff., and in T.A.P., XL, 137-8. The subject 
may be that of a sick glutton. 

317 



LUCILIUS 

678 
Nonius, 279, 7 : ' Dare,' ostendcre ... — 
Animo qui aegrotat videmus corpore hunc signum 
dare ; 

679 

Nonius, 268, 27 : ' Confectum,' defessum ... — 
turn doloribus confectum corpus aninio obsisterc. 

680 

Nonius, 408, 29 : ' Tangere,' inspicere ... — 
nequam prius quam venas hominis tetigit ac prae- 
cordia. 

681 

Nonius, 214, 19 : ' Nundinae ' . . . masculini ... — 
paucorum atque hoc pacto si nil gustat inter- 
nundinum, 

682-3 
Nonius, 103, 24 : ' EleVit,' maculavit . . . — 

Si hie vestimenta elevit luto, 
ab eo risum magnum inprudens ac cachinnum subicit. 

^^° nequam cdd. nunquara Gerlach neque lun. 

^^^ nundinum Flor. 2 nundino odd. 
^^^ adeo Mr. inprudens a. c. Quich. ad chaeinnum 
inprudens cdcl. 

" but nequam is not certain. ' Before the rascal felt the 
poor fellow's pulse ' (?). 

2i8 



BOOK XXVI 

678 

A sick man ; diagnosis : 

Nonius : ' Dare,' to show ... — 

We see him who is sick in mind showing the mark 
of it on his body ; 

679 
Nonius : ' Confectum ' (spent, worn out), tired out ... — 

that then the body, spent with pains, sets itself 
against the mind. 

680 
Medical aid : 

Nonius : ' Tangere ' (touch, feel), to inspect . . . — 

before he felt the rascal's " pulse and tested his 
heart. 

681 
Fasting of the pat ietit : 
Nonius : ' Nundinae ' ... of the masculine gender 

of a few . . . and if in this way he tastes nothing 
for a week and more,^ 

682-3 
Progress of the illness : 
Nonius : ' Elevit ' (fouled), spotted ... — 

If he has fouled his clothes with dirt, from this he 
unwittingly prompts great laughter and jeering. 

* Marx takes paucorum as an epithet of dierum, but it may 
depend on a verb of partaking or needing. It is impossible 
to take internundinum as a genitive plural here. Nundinum 
or internundinum is in fact neuter. 

2T9 



LUCILIUS 

684-5 
Nonius, 38, 23 : ' Expirare ' . . . — 

lit si eluviem facere per ventrem velis, 
ciira ne omnibus distento corpore expiret viis. 
Cp. Non., 103, 28. 

686 
Nonius, 290, 31 : ' Exigere ' est excludere . . . (291, 10) — 
vestimentis frigus atque horrorem exacturum putet. 

687 
Nonius, 293, 9 : ' Evadere ' est liberari ... — 
Idcirco omnes evasuros censent aegritudinem. 

688 
Nonius, 394, 31 : ' Siccum,' exercitum ... — 
•' Cum stadio in gymnasio in duplici corpus siccassem 
pila," 

Sat. V. 

This satire (like the whole book perhaps) is an elaaycoyq 
addressed to a man (perhaps Congus — see above, p. 201 
and esp. Cichor., 109 ff., 120 flf.) who is about to complete 

689 
Nonius, 437, 12 : ' Probatum ' et ' spectatum ' . . . — 

tuam probatam mi et spectatam maxume adulescen- 
tiam. 

^^5 cura ne Onions curare cdd. 

^^^ putat D (F.) forlasse frigus se atque 

^^^ omnes se Quich. omnem se Mr. 

688 gymnasi cum s. i. d. Mr. in stadio M 

220 



BOOK XXVI 

684-5 

Nonius : ' Expirare ' . . . — 

so that if you wish to make a purging through the 
bowels, take care lest it should pour from your 
puffy body by all passages. 

686 
Sweating out the fever : 

Nonius : ' Exigere ' (drive out) means to exclude ... — 
... he may think that he will drive out the chill 
and shivering with bedclothes. 

687 
Nonius : ' Evadere ' (escape) means to be set free ... — 
Therefore they believe that all patients will escape 
from illness. 

688 
Convalescence ? : 

Nonius : ' Siccum ' (dry), exercised ... — 
" When I had dried my body on the race-course, 
in the gjTiinasium, and in the game of double-ball," ^ 

Sat. V. 

a work in prose on the ancient history of Rome. Lucihus 
advises him to write in poetry on contemporary Roman 
history instead. The satire expresses several Epicurean ideas. 

689 

LuciUus trusts his friend : 

Nonius : ' Probatum ' and ' spectatum ' . . . — 
your youth which I have thoroughly tried and 
observed. 

" I take this as applying to the patient ; but Lucilius may 
be referring to his own method of being healthy. The game 
was probably a simple one where two persons threw one or 
two balls to each other. 

221 



LUCILIUS 



690 

Nonius, 497, 20 : Accusativus vel nommativus pro abla- 
tivo ... — 

Haec tu si voles per auris pectus inrigarier, 

691 

Nonius, 110, 30 : ' FoUiculum ' Lucilius posuit pro corpore 
lib. XXVI— 

Ego si, qui sum et quo foUiculo nunc sum indutus, 
non queo. . . . 

692-3 
Nonius, 117, 24 : ' Genium,' parsimoniam ... — 
Curet aegrotum, sumtum homini praebeat, genium 

suum 
defrudet, ali parcat. 

694 
Nonius, 372, 1 : ' Praecipere ' est iubere vel monere ... — 
Porro amici est bene praecipere, Tusci bene prae- 
dicere. 

695 

Lactantius, Div. Institiit., VI, 18, 6 : Viator ille verus ac 
iustus non dicet illud Lucilianum — 

Homini amico et familiari non est mentiri meum. 

^^^ defrudet ali parcat cdd. defrudet, det alii, parcat M 

det alii parta B fraudet alii parcat Mr. 

®** Tusci bene praedicere Mercier prob. H, C.Q., I, 59 
veri C 116-7 et veri Terzaghi bene tueri praedicant 
M tueri bene praedicare cdd. 

695 trib. lib. XXVI C, 119//. 

" or ' to let this advice be poured as water into your mind.' 
* sc. undertake to write a lofty epic ? The construction 
may be siqui sum et {si)quo . . . 



BOOK XXVI 

690 

Lucilius craves attention : 

Nonius : The accusative or the nominative instead of the 
ablative ... — ■ 

If you will be content to let your mind be watered 
by this advice " through your ears, 

691 

Lucilius disckiims lofty powers ? 

Nonius : ' Folliculus ' (little bag, ball, husk) is a term 
put by Lucilius for body in the twenty-sixth book — 

If, being what I am and in the husk in which I am 
clothed, I cannot for my part '^ . . . 

692-3 
He plays a friend's part : 

Nonius : ' Genius ' (inclination, appetite), parsimony '^ . . . — 
Let him take care of a sick friend, let him give of 

his purse to the fellow, spite his own inclination, and 

be forbearino; ^^'ith another. '^ 



694 



Nonius : ' Praecipere ' (take in advance; forewarn), means 
to order or to advise ... — 

Further it is the part of a friend to forewarn aright, 
of a Tuscan soothsayer to foretell aright. 

695 

Lactantius : That true and just wayfarer will not use that 
well-known saying of Lucilius — 

It is not my way to lie to a friend and aquaintance. 

"^ This is quite wrong on Nonius' part ; note that Lucilius' 
precept is distinctly Epicurean. 

^ or possibly ' let him forbear to receive nourishment.' 

223 



LUCILIUS 

696-7 

Servius, ad Aen., X, 564 : ' Tacitae ' Amyclae dictae sunt 
quod periere silentio. Hinc est quod ait Lucilius — 

Mihi necesse est eloqui, 
nam scio Amyclas tacendo periise. 



698 
Donatus, ad Ter., Aridr., V, 4, 11 : ' Ut,' ne non. Lucilius — 
Metuam ut memoriani retineas. . . . 

699 
Nonius, 293, 1 : ' Evadere,' exire, tendere ... — 
Evadat saltern aliquid aliqiia quod conatus sum. 

700 
Nonius, 330, 13 : ' Induci,' delectari . . . — 
Veterem historiam, inductus studio, scribis ad 
amores tuos ; 

701 
Nonius, 88, 29 : ' Cordi est ' . . . animo scdet ... — 
et quod tibi magno opere cordi est, mihi vehemen- 
ter displicet, 

^*^-^ ex libro XX VI ? metuam Bentley tuam vel 

tu iam cdd. 
^^^ aliquo Mr. 
'"^ fortasse mi vementer L 

224 



BOOK XXVI 

696-7 

Servius : Amyclae <» was called ' quiet ' because it perished 
through silence. Hence that remark of Lucilius — 

I must needs speak out, for I know that Amyclae 
perished through keeping quiet. 

698 
Donatus : ' Ut,' lest . . . not. Lucilius — 
I shall fear lest you do not keep in mind . . . 

699 

Hojpe of results : 

Nonius : ' Evadere,' turn out, follow a course ... — 
May something which I have tried to produce find 
at least some outlet for itself.^ 

700 

You are ivriting an ancient history ; I donH like that : 
Nonius : ' Induci ' (to be led on, induced), to be delighted 

Led on by your eagerness, you are writing an 
ancient history addressed to your dearest friend ; 

701 
Nonius : ' Cordi est ' means . . . lies at the heart ... — 
and that which lies passionately at your heart is 
violently displeasing to me, 

" Amyclae in Laconia ? Without distinguishing, Servius 
states that, warned often but wrongly that an enemj'- was 
approaching, it forbade the spreading of any such warning, 
and was then captured unawares. Virgil, with others after 
him, seems to have applied the story to Amyclae in Italy 
which had become deserted because of a plague of serpents. 

* or ' May something which I have tried turn out somehow 
at any rate.' 

225 

VOL. III. Q 



LUCILIUS 

702 
Nonius, 74, 27 : ' Apisci,' adipisci ... — 
ut ego effugiam quod te in priniis cupere apisci 
intellego. 

703 
Nonius, 353, 11 : ' Niti ' . . . — 
summis nitere opibus, at ego contra ut dissimilis 
siem. 

704 
Nonius, 78, 2 : ' Bulga ' est folliculus ... — 
ita uti quisque nostrum e bulga est matris in lucem 
editus. 

705 
Nonius, 183, 31 : ' Vegrande,' valde grande ... — 
Non idcirco extollitur nee vitae vegrandi datur. 
Cp. Non., 297, 40. 

706 
Nonius, 367, 10 : ' Petere,' cupere, appetere ... — 
Sin autem hoc vident, bona semper petere sapientem 
[et] putant, 

707 
Nonius, 88, 29 : ' Cordi est ' . . . 
Tibi porro istaec res idcirco est cordi quod rere utilem. 

'°2 eflfuciam Lu. 1 efficiam Lips 
'"^ seclud. et lun. exputant co7ii. Linds. 
'"' tibi L si tibi cdd. rere lun. re cdd. utilest 
Onions 

<* These last three fragments may be joined together. 

* Marx rightly thinks Lucilius here expresses the Epicurean 
idea that all living things aim at pleasure from birth. Bulga is 
here a vulgar word for womb. 

226 



BOOK XXVI 

702 
Nonius : * Apisci,' the same as * adipisci ... — 
SO that I recoil from that which, I understand, you 
wish especially to attain.* 

703 
We go different ways : 
Nonius : ' Niti ' . . . — 

You press on to the best of your powers . . . but 
I on the other hand strive to be quite unlike that. 

704 
And this is natural : 

Nonius : * Bulga ' means a little bag ... — 
just as when each of us was given forth to light 
from a mother's bag.^ 

705 
Pleasure not the chief aim of life : 
Nonius : ' Vegrande,' very large " . . . — 
That is not why a man is brought up and not for 
that is he given over to a short life. 

706 
Nonius : * Petere,' to want, to grasp after ... — 
But if they see this, and think that the wise man 
always aims at things that are good, 

707 
Lucilius admits the utility of ancient history : 
Nonius : ' Cordi est ' . . . — 

Further this matter lies at your heart because 
you think it is useful. 

'^ Nonius, misled by the double negative in his example, 
has taken vegrandis wrongly; it means ' not large.' 

227 

q2 



LUCILIUS 

708-9 

Nonius, 437, 14 : ' Bellum ' et * proelium ' . . . — 

ut Romanus populus victus vei, superatus proeliis 
saepe est multis, bello vero numquam, in quo sunt 
omnia. 

Cp. Non., 420, 32. 

710-1 

Nonius, 186, 31 : ' Viriatum ' dictum est magnarum 
virium ... — 

contra flagitium nescire bello vinci a barbaro 
Viriato, Annibale. 

712 

Nonius, 437, 20 : Inter ' cavere ' et ' vitare ' Lucilius 
esse distantiam voluit, lib. XXVI, et esse plus ' vitare ' — 

quid cavendum tibi censerem, quid vitandum 
maxume. 

713 

Nonius, 396, 9 : ' Sumere,' suscipere ... — 
Hunc laborem sumas laudem qui tibi ac fructum ferat. 

714 
Nonius, 255, 1 : ' Crepare ' est sonare ... — 
Percrepa pugnam Popili, facta Corneli cane. 

'08 ut mn. cdd. 420 at .Mr. vei Mr. vel cdd. 420 
vi et cdd. 437 

'^2 censerem Quich. 

'1^ Popili Gerlach pompili cdd. 

" This etymology is false. 
228 



BOOK XXVI 

708-9 
The greatness oj Rortie's 'past in wars : 
Nonius : ' Bellum ' and ' proelium ' . . . — 
as the Roman people has been often beaten by 

force and overcome in many battles, but never in a 

whole war, in which lies all that is \dtal. 

710-1 

Nonius : ' Viriatus ' was used for anything of great 
* vires ' " . . . — 

that on the contrary we know not disgrace of defeat 
in a whole war by barbarian Viriathus or Hannibal. 

712 
Lucilius gives his advice : 

Nonius : Lucilius in book XXVI meant to make a difference 
between ' cavere ' and ' vitare,' and to make ' vitare ' the 
stronger term — 

what I thought you should beware of and what 
you should avoid most. 

713 

Nonius : ' Sumere,' to undertake ... — 

You must undertake a labour that may bring 
praise and profit for you. 

714 

Tell of modern wars : 

Nonius : ' Crepare ' means to sound ... — 
Make a loud noise about Popillius' battle, 
And sing the exploits of Cornelius.^ 

" i.e. let your subject be modern history in epic verse 
{cane). Popillius Laenas was defeated in 138 bj' the Numan- 
tines (Liv. epit., 55) who were laid low in 133 by Corn. Scip. 
Aemil. 

229 



LUCILIUS 

715-6 
Nonius, 238, 25 : ' Appellere ' est applicare ... — 
Aggere in iaciendo siquost vineis actis opus, 
primum id dant operara ut quamprimum appell- 
ant. . . . 
Cp. Non., 243, 43; 327, 26. 

717 

Nonius, 388, 16 : ' Saevum ' dicitur inmite . . . 
quodque te in tranquillum ex saevis transfers tem- 
pestatibus. 

718 
Nonius, 250, 24 : ' Colere,' diligere ... — 
Quare hoc colere est satius quam ilia, studium omne 



hie consumere. 



719 



Nonius, 110, 19 : ' Fulgorivit,' fulgorem fecit vel fulmine 
afflavit ... — 

lucorum exactorem Albanum et fulguritarum 
arborum. 



'15 in vineis aid. 238 om. in cdd. 243, 327 
'^Mransfers Dousa (I.) transfert cow?. Mercier trans- 
fer cdd. 

'1* lucorum L luporum cdd. exactorem Lips 
exauctorem cdd. prob. M Albanum {vel Albanum) Mr. 
malvanum cdd. fulguritarum Flor. 3 fulguritatem 

cdil. fulguritorem Mr. 

230 



BOOK XXVI 

715-6 

Nonius : ' Appellere,' means to apply . . . 

In throwing up a mound, if there is any need to 
bring up penthouses, they take pains first to apply 
quickly "... 

717 

Lucilius' reasons for his advice : 

Nonius : ' Saevum ' is a term for ungentle . . » — 

and because you transfer yourself from fierce 
storms into calm.^ 

718 

Nonius : ' Colere,' to esteem ... — 

Wherefore it is better to devote yourself to this 
pursuit rather than to that,*^ and to spend all your 
diligence in this sphere. 

719 

Unplaced fragment : 

Nonius : ' Fulgorivit,' made lightning or blasted with a 
thunderbolt ... — 

overseer of the Alban groves and the trees which 
have been struck by lightning. 

" so. niuro vineas (Marx). Is Lucilius using a common 
task of the Numantine war to illustrate the labour of writing 
about it ? 

* i.e. because writing ancient history transfers you from 
the pohtical squabbles of the Gracchan age to peace of mind 
fCichor., 112 ff.) 

* i.e. to epic poetry rather than to annals in prose. 



LUCILIUS 

Sat, VI. 
720-1 
Xonius, 253, 10 : ' Capere,' delectare . . • — 
Nunc itidem populo . . . his cum scriptoribus ; 
voluimus capere animum illorum. 

722 
Nonius, 186, 35 : ' Vescum,' rainutum, obscurum ... — 
quam fastidiosum ac vescum vivere. 
Cp. GeU., XVI, 5, 7. 

723 
Nonius, 191, 12 : ' Angues ' masculino genere ... — 
nisi portenta anguisque volucris ac pinnatos scribitis. 
Cp. Non., 436, 9. 

724-5 

Nonius, 499, 7 : Dativns pro accusativo ... — 
Si miserantur se ipsi, vide ne illorum causa superior 
t e loco se conlocarit. 

'2" populo <placere noIo> his cum M populo istuni 
cdd. populo placere nolo M populum aucupamur 

istis cum s. Mr. populost ut Leo 

■^22 vescum cum (om. cum L».) fastidio vivere ccZ(Z. secliid. 
cum fastidio Gerlach vivere cum fastidio Terzaghi fas- 
tidito vivere Leo 

724-5 superior e loco se collocarit L (collocarit Guietus) et 
loco bono locata sit coJii. M si miserantur se ipsi, vide | 

causam (causara Guietus) illorum superiore conlocarit ne loco 
Mr. fortasse eo loco superiore loco conlooavit cdd. 

2^2 



BOOK XXVI 

Sat. VI. Literary controversy.'^ Methods of certain writers 
are rejected. 

720-1 

Nonius : ' Capere,' to delight ... — 

Now likewise . . . the people together A\'ith such 
writers as these ; I wanted to take their fancy. 

722 

Nonius : ' Vescum ' (foodless; thin), minute, obscure ... — 

than to pass through life as a squeamish and a thin 
feeble fellow.^ 

723 

Imitations of the tragic style : 

Nonius : ' Angues ' in the masculine gender ... — 

P ^ unless you all write about portents and flying 
feathered snakes. 

724-5 

Nonius : The dative ^ instead of the accusative ... — 

P ? If these persons actually show self-pity, look 
to it lest their case, being the better one, has put 
itself in that position. 

" With special allusions and references in parody to the 
tragic style of Pacuvius (Cichor., 127 fif.), marked here P. 

^ Marx attributes this Kne to a speech of Antiopa (of 
Pacuvius). But she would have used feminine adjectives. 

' allusion to Pacuvius, Medus, cf. Cichor., 136 fF. ; Fiske, 
T.A.P., XL, 528, and Remains of Old Latin, Vol. II, pp. 
2.54-5. 

^ Nonius mistook ipsi for a dative. Marx thinks that the 
rhetorical device of ' commiseratio ' is laughed at. Cp. Fiske, 
110, and id., in T.A.P., XL, 128. illorum causa (abl.) would 
suit the metre better ; but all is micertain. 

233 



LUCILIUS 

726 
Nonius, 138, 22 : * Monstrificabile ' . . .— 
. . . Nunc ignobilitas his mirum ac monstrificabile. 

727-8 
Nonius, 125, 27 : ' Inluvies,' sordes , , . — 

Hie cruciatur fame 
frigore inluvie inbalnitie inperfimditie incuria. 

729-30 

Nonius, 126, 3 : ' Invidiosuni,' quod sit vitabile ad viden- 
dum ... — 

squalitate summa ac scabie summa in aerumna 

obrutam, 

neque inimicis invidiosam, neque amico exoptabilem. 

Cp. Non., 226, 8. 

731 

Nonius, 502, 6 : Accusativus pro dativo ... — 
suspendatne sese an gladium incumbat, ne caelum 
bibat. 

'28 inluvie inperfundie inbalnitie odd. {recte ?) inper- 

funditie Guietus 

'3^ sese an Koch se cdd. an ms. Fahri an in 

cdd. rell. 



" uncertain, but it mocks at Pacuvius' ( ?) ' luctificabile ' ; 
cp. Ciehor., 130; Fiske, T.A.P., XL, 129; Remains, Vol. II, 
pp. 164-5. 

234 



BOOK XXVI 

726 
Lycus and Dirce ? : 
Nonius : * Monstrificabile ' . . . — 

P " Well now, to these men low birth is a wonder, 
a monstrifical thing. 

727-8 
Antiopa imprisoned : 
Xonius : ' Inluvies,' dirt. ... — 

P ^ Here she is racked by hunger, and by cold 
Uncleanliness, bathlessness, washlessness, 
Uncaredforness. 

729-30 

Nonius ; ' Invidiosum ' (really enviable), the sort of thing 
which ought to be avoided as regards the eyesight ... — 

P '^ . . . a woman overwhelmed 

With deepest dirtiness and scabbiness, 

In direst want, not envied by the unfriendly, 

Nor to be longed for by a friend. 

731 

Antiopa ? Ajax ? : 

Nonius : The accusative instead of the dative. ... — 

P ^ whether she should hang herself or fall upon a 
sword, lest she still drink the air. 

* Remains, Vol. II, pp. 164-5; Pacuv., Antiopa. 
" see preceding note. 

<* This fr. may refer not to Antiopa but to Ajax, in Pacuvius' 
Armorum Indicium, Remains, 11, pp. 178-9 . 

235 



LUCILIUS 

732 

Nonius, 264, 30 : * Cogere,' in unum colligere ... — 
" Rauco contionem sonitu et curvis cogant cornibus." 

733 

Nonius, 528, 9 : * De ' pro ab . . . — 
Solus illam vim de classe prohibuit Vulcaniam. 

734 
Nonius, 96, 1 : ' Domutionem ' . . . — 
Domutionis cupidi imperium regis paene inmin- 
uimus. 

735 

Nonius, 381, 24 : ' Referre ' significat perferre, indicare 

t quod is t intellegebar posse t baud f ad paucos 
rettuli. 

736 
Nonius, 491, 29 : * Glutino ' pro glutine . . . 
. . . Praeterito tepido glutinator glutino. 

'^3 illam L etiam M idem vel etiam Mr, Aiax 
Passerat, Duebner iam aid. de classe Aid. de 

claasse Stowasser declarasse cdd. 

"^* domum itionis L domuitionis (domuitjonis) Stowasser 

'^^ vide Linds. ad loc. 

'^^ praetreito coni. Mr. 

<* Pacuv., Armorum Judicium, in Remains of Old Latin, 
Vol. II, pp. 172-3. The line perhaps expresses a Roman 
custom; see Fiske, C.P., III, 337-9. 

^ Remains, II, 174-5 ? Homer, II., XVI, 574 £F. 

' ' domutio ' is found in Pacuvius and Accius [Remains, II, 
228-9 and 372-3, cp. 608-9). The incident is probably that 
described in Homer, II., II, 212 ff. Thersites wanted tlie 
Achacans to give up the siege of Troy. 

236 



BOOK XXVI 

732 
Agamemnon proclaims a competition for Achilles^ arms : 
Nonius : ' Cogere,' to gather into a mass ... — 
P ° " Let them bring together a meeting with the 
hoarse blare of crump horns." 

733 

Ajax saves the fleet at Troy : 
Nonius : ' De ' for ' ab ' . . . — 

P ^ He alone kept back yonder violence of the 
Fire-god from the fleet. 

734 
A Greek praises Ulysses for striking Thersites ? : 
Nonius : ' Domutionem ' . . . — 
P ^ We in our eagerness for home-going 
Ruined well-nigh the King's authority. 

735 
Lucilius appeals to his friends for guidance : 
Nonius : ' Referre ' means to convey, to point out ... — 
<^ because I was understood, being what I am, to 
have the power (sc. to write tragedies) ... I referred 
it to a few friends. 

736 
Touching up a book : 

Nonius : ' Glutino ' for * glutine ' . . . — 
Let the gluer rub it over with warm glue.^ 

^ The fr. is corrupt. 

* Nonius says book XXVI, so we have an incomplete 
septenarius (Cichor., 152-3). Mueller (Marx approving, not 
without reason) puts the fragment in bk. XXVIII as a com- 
plete senarius. praeterito may be 2nd person imperative, and 
glutinator a vocative. 

237 



LUCILIUS 

LlBEll XXMI 

8a f. T. 

737 

Nonius, 237, 33 : ' Adit us ' interpeUatio. . . . Lucilius 
lib. XXVIl— 

** Pacem cum peto cum placo, cum adeo et cum 
appello meam." 

738 

Nonius, 238, 21 : ' Appellare ' . . . — 
" Cum mei me adeunt servuli, non dominam ego 
appellem meam ? " 

739 
Nonius, 472, 13 : ' Inpertit ' . . . — 
Sospitat, inpertit salutem plurimam et plenissimam, 

740 
Nonius, 420, 3 : ' Verrere,' ferire, pervertere ... — 
" quam non solum devorare se omnia ac devorrere " 

741 

Nonius, 296, 27 : ' Expedire,' utile esse ... — 
" Ego enim an perficiam ut me amare expediat? " 

'3' pacem cum L cum pacem cdd. 

'^* sospita inperti salute piurima e. p. L sospitat saluti 
inpertit M plurimam et plenissimam Par. 7667 

piurima et plenissima rell. 

''^^ at coni. Linds. devorrere Linds. deverrere cdd. 

'^^ enim an cdd. ego enim ah vel a Mr. perficiam 
Madvig pereiciam cdd. (peritiam Escorial.) 

** Lucilius discourses upon love, the use of wealth, and the 
fortunes of life, perhaps in three separate satires, though I 
distinguish them with hesitation. 
238 



BOOK XXVII 

BOOK XXVII « 

Sat. I. Lovers madness. 
737 
(A) a TOTTos from the Eunuchus of Terence, or his Greek model.^ 
Lover and mistress : 

Nonius : ' Aditus ' (approach) interruption. . . . Lucilius 
has ' adeo ' in book XXVII — 

" When I ask to make it up, when I pacify her, 
when I go to her and call her ' my dear.* " 

738 

Behaviour before slaves : 
Nonius : ' Appellare ' . . . — 

" When my little slaves come to me, am I not to 
address my dear as ' mistress ' ? " 

739 
Uncertain love : 
Nonius : ' Inpertit ' . . . — 

He hopes she will prosper and sends his very best 
wishes for her heartiest good health. 

740 
Nonius : ' Verrere ' (sweep), to beat, turn aside. ... — 
" a woman who . . . she can not only gobble up 
and make a clean sweep of everything ..." 

741 
Nonius : ' Expedire,' to be useful ... — 
" But shall I ever manage to make it worth her 
while to love me? " 

'' Fiske, Lucilius and Horace, 393 ff. I adopt his order, but 
exclude Marx 731. cf. Terence, Eun., 46 fF. 

239 



LUCILIUS 

742 
Nonius, 253, 23 : * Capere,' decipere, circumvenire ... — 
At metuis porro ne aspectu et forma capiare 
altera." 

743 
Nonius, 284, 32 : ' Differrc,' distare . . . — 
Tamen aut verruca aut cicatrix melius; papulae 
difFerunt. 

744 

Nonius, 37, 6 : ' Maltas ' veteres molles appeUari voluerunt, 
a Graeco, quasi i-iaXaKovs ... — 

Insanum vocant quern maltam ac feminam dici 
vident. 

745 
Nonius, 366, 31 : ' Petcre,' scqui ... — 
Rerum exploratorem mittam, miserum mendicum 
petam. 

746 
Nonius, 37, 11 : ' Monogrammi ' . . . — 
Quae pietas? Monogrammi quinque adducti ; 
pietatem vocant ! 

'*2 capiar alterae Dziatzko 

"*3 aut Mercier fortasse tamen | alii veruca aliti Lu., 
G. aditi rell. melius M medicis Stowasser naevus 
Mercier naeveis Mr. medio L medius cdd. 

'** vocant cdd. vocans B vident T lubct coni. 
Linds. videt cdd, 

'*^ exploratorem Escorial. 2 explicatorem Lu. ex- 
pilatorem vel expiratorem rell. 

240 



BOOK XXVII 

742 

Nonius : ' Capere,' to deceive, ' get round ' . . . 
" But you fear further lest you are taken in by 
another girl's looks and form." 

743 

(B) Blemishes of a looman ? 
Nonius : ' Differre,' to stand apart ... — 
Still, better either a wart or a scar; as for 
pimples, they're different. 

744 

Blemishes of a m/in ? : 

Nonius : The old writers by using of men the term 
' maltae ' " meant ' soft,' from the Greek, as it were iiaXaKoi 
(or fiaXOaKOLl) ... — 

They call him a madman whom they see to be 
known as ' mollycoddle ' and ' feminine.' 

745 
Discovering and punishitig an unfaithful mistress ? : 
Nonius : ' Petere ' (look for, go for), to follow ... — 
I'll send a man to spy out affairs, I'll look for a 
wretched beggar. 

746 
Nonius : ' Monogrammi ' . . . — 

What sort of kindness ? Five sketches ^ were 
brought in ; and they call it kindness ! 

* maltha is (i) petroleum-tar; (ii) a thick poHsh made of 
slaked lime and fat. 

* Mere ' shadows ' or ' scrawls ' of men. See pp. 20-1. 

241 



LUCILIUS 

747 

Nonius, 271, 27 : ' Cacderc,' excidere ... — 
" Lignum caedat pensum facial aedes verrat vapulet." 
Cp. Non. 420, 10. 

748 

Nonius, 74, 19 : ' Ardum ' pro aridum ... — 
Ardum miserinum atqiie infelix lignum sabucum 
vocat. 

Sat. II 

749 

Nonius, 275, 13 : ' Conmodare ' est mutuari ... — 
Ccrta sunt sine detrimento quae inter sese conmo- 
dent. 

750 
Nonius, 370, 29 : ' Parcere,' servare ... — 
Parcat illi magis cui possit, cui fidem esse existiment. 
Cp. Serv., ad Aen., X, .532. 

751-2 

Nonius, 29, 1 : ' Pedetcmtim ' et ' pedepressim ' dictum est 
caute, quasi lenta et tarda itione ... — 

lUe contra omnia inter plures sensim et pedetemtim 

foris, 
nequem laedat. 

747 vorrat Mr. 

'*8 miserinum Flor. 3 prob. Linds. (cf. Class. Rev., X, 17). 
miserrimum cfW. lignum lun. signura cdd. vocant 

lun. 

'^^ malus vel mains aid. magis Gerlach cui cdd. 
qui M cui prosit Mr. existiment D(r.) existimet Mr. 
eximent cdd. (extiment Bern. 83) 

242 



BOOK XXVII 

747 

Nonius : ' Caedere,' to cut out ... — 
** Let her chop wood, spin her weight of wool, 
sweep the rooms, and take a hiding." 

748 
The following perhaps belongs to this context : 
Nonius : ' Ardum ' for ' aridum ' . . . — 
He calls the elder a sapless, miserable little tree , 
an unlucky tree." 

Sat. II. On the intercourse of men. 

749 

Affairs of business : 

Nonius : ' Commodare ' means to borrow * . . . — 

There are established things which men may give 
and take on loan among themselves without dis- 
advantage.^ 

750 

Nonius : ' Parcere,' to preserve ... — 

Let him rather reserve ^ for whomever he can, 
for the man in whom they think ^ is some honour. 

751-2 

Nonius : ' Pedetemtim ' (step by step) and ' pedepressim ' 
are terms used for cautiously, as it were with a slow and tardy 
walk ... — 

He on the other hand, in public and amongst a 
crowd, does everything gently, step by step, lest he 
hurt anyone. 

" the elder was a tree of bad omen. 

* in fact commodare means to lend, mutuari to borrow. 
<^ a teaching of Panaetius. 

^ or ' Let him show forbearance. 

* i.e. (if existiment is right) in whom the business- world 
in general has faith. But this fr. is obscure. 

243 
r2 



LUCILIUS 

753-4 

Nonius, 37, 15 : * Portorium ' dicitur merces quae porti- 
toribus datur ... — 

Facit idem quod illi qui inscriptum e portu exportant 

clanculum 
ne portorium dent. 

755-7 
Nonius, 358, 31 : ' Offendere,' laedere ... — 

Nam hie quidem 
reditum talem portendebant, neque alia in re f ulla f 
ofFendere. 

758 
Nonius, 477, 26 : ' Adiutatur ' pro adiutat ... — 
nee si paulo minus usurast magna adiutatus diu, 

759 
Nonius, 213, 34 : ' Messem ' . . . masculino ... — 
potius quam non magno messe, non proba vindemia. 

760 
Nonius, 88, 8 : ' Cibicidas ' . . . — 
viginti an triginta domi vel centum cibicidas alas. 

755 hi M 

"5^ reditum <tibi> | talem M nam hi reditum quidem 
Terzaghi re ed. ami. 1480 mare aid. ulla cd. 

ulula Lu. 1 in me recula coni. Linds. ulla fortasse 
delemlum 

'5^ usurast ]Mr. usuras et cdd. 

760 viginti an triginta domi vel centum Linds. v, d. a. t. 
cdd. an centum Mr. 

244 



BOOK XXVII 

75^-4 

Nonius : * Portorium ' is a term used of the due which 
is given to customs-officers ... — 

He does the same as those who carry out secretly 
from a harbour unregistered ** wares, so that they 
may not pay the customs-due. 

755-7 

Nonius : * Offendere,' to hurt ... — 

For then indeed they kept predicting for you a 
return such as this, and they caused you no 
offence^ in any other matter. 

758 
Nonius : ' Adiutatur ' for ' adiutat ' . . . — 
nor, if it (your estate ?) has for a long time helped 
you with a profit somewhat on the smaller side, 

759 
Nonius : ' Messis ... in the masculine ... — 
rather than with a harvest not big and a vintage 
not good. 

760 
Household economy ? {Cynic theme of 'plain living ?) : 
Parasites : 

Nonius : ' Cibicidas ' . . . — 

whether you feed at home twenty or thirty or a 
hundred munch-murderers.*^ 

" i.e. contraband, not entered up {dva7T6ypa(f>ov) by the 
customs-officials. 

* or, offemlere ' that it does you no harm.' 

<■ or, ' bread- butchers ' : clients, parasites, or slaves. 

245 



LUCILIUS 

761-2 
Nonius, 331, 8 : ' Insignc,' utile, necessarium ... — 
Cocus non curat cauda insignem esse illam, dura 

pinguis siet ; 
sic amici quaerunt animum, rem parasiti ac ditias. 

763-5 
Nonius, 88, 10 : ' Contenturum ' . . . — 

Tu Lucilium 
credis contenturum, cum me ruperim, summa omnia 
fecerim ? 

Cp. Non., 382, 31. 

766-7 

Nonius, 27, 6 : ' Strabones ' sunt strambi {sfrabi ?) quos 
nunc dicimus ... — 

nuUi me invidere, non strabonem fieri saepius 
deliciis me istorum. 

768 
Nonius, 88, 17 : ' Canicas ' veteres furfures esse voluerunt 

quanti vellet quam canicas ac pultem e Magonis 
manu. 

'^^ Cauda Onions caudam G. claudam vel claudus 
rell. fortasse alaudam illara aid. hillai Mr., sec. 
D (I.) uUam Ribb. 

'^2 amici quaerunt Duebner animum q. a. Mr. amici 
a. q. cdd. ac ditias ed. princ. ac divitias aut (aut d. a.) 
cdd. aut ditias coni. Linds. 

'^^ forlasse <me>tu 

'^■* ruperint cdd., 88, 382 ruperim Tun. 

'^^ ac pultem M a pulte Lu. apud te rell. {rede ?) 
e (ec) Mr. et cdd. seclud. Onions Magonis lun. 

mangonis ei. princ. maconis Lu. {prob. Mr. = mangonis) 
magonis rell. et Flor. 3 

246 



BOOK XXVII 

761-2 

Nonius : * Insigne ' (remarkable), useful, necessary ... — 

A cook cares not that yonder bird is remarkable 

for his tail, provided that it ^ is a fat bird. So do 

friends have an eye to a man's mind, and parasites 

to his Avealth and money. 

763-5 
Nonius : ' Contenturum ' . . . — 

Do you believe that I, Lucilius, will go on striving 
when I have fairly burst myself, aye, done all my 
very best ? ^ 

766-7 
Nonius : ' Strabones ' is a term used of those whom we now 
call ' strambi ' . . . — • 

that I envy no one, and are not too often made 
cross-eyed '' by the choice allurements of those 
fellows. 

768 

Nonius : ' Canicae ' is a term by which the ancients meant 
to express bran ... — 

at what price he likes, rather than bran and pottage 
from a Mago's hand.^ 

<* possibly a peacock bred for the table, when the so-called 
tail would be of no use. But the reading cauda is not certain. 

^ I take contenturum as from contendo, not contineo. If 
from contineo, then ' will hold myself in,' '. . . contain 
myself.' 

' this implies envj. 

<* I think there is a disparaging allusion to the importation 
of foreign grain, in this case from Africa, whether we read 
Magonis (a Carthaginian name; but elsewhere it is Mdgonis) 
or mangonis. There was a Carthaginian named Mago whose 
work on agriculture was translated into Latin by order of the 
Senate— Cic, Or., I, 58, 249; Varro, R.R., I, 1, 10; Colum., I, 
1, 13; Pliny, XVIII, 22. 

247 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. III. 
769 
Nonius, 275, 19 : ' Captare ' . . . — 
Quod si paulisper captare atque observare haec 
volueris, 

770 
Nonius, 238, 5 ; ' Adtendere ' est intendere ... — 
Rem cognoscas simul, et dictis animum attendas 
postulo. 
Cp. Non., 275, 22. 

771 
Nonius, 138, 16 : ' Mutuum ' pro mutuo ... — 
et si, maxime quod spero, mutuum hoc mecum facis, 

772-3 
Nonius, 374, 21 : ' Proferre,' palara facere ... — 

Proferat 
ergo iamiam vaster ordo scelera quae in se admiserit. 

774 
Nonius, 360, 10 : ' Observare ' . . . — 
Quod si observas hominem, qui pro commodo et regno 
audeat, 

772-3 proferat ego iamiam C 146 iam nunc Norden 

proferam ego L proferat iam ergo ordo voster Mr. 
proferat ergo iam vester cdd. fortasse proferat ergo ea 
vestcr 

'"* fortasse quid audeat lun. gaudcat cdd. (gaudeas 
Lu. 1) fortasse le ga,udea,t 

248 



BOOK XXVII 

Sat. III. Address to a senatorial friend on how to hear 
life's changes of fortune.'^ 

769 
Share this problem with me ? : 
Nonius : ' Captare ' . . . — 

But if you ^vill please take and look at this for a 
little Mhile. 

770 
Nonius : * Adtendere ' means to bend towards ... — 
I ask you to look into this with me and bend your 
mind to what I say. 

771 
Nonius : ' Mutuum ' for ' mutuo ' . . . — 
and if, as I hope above everything, you will do the 
same as I in this, returning like for like. 

772-3 
Misdeeds of the high-horn : 
Nonius : ' Proferre,' to make public ... — 
Then let your order ^ now^ bring to light the villainies 
which it has committed. 

774 
Men's motives and objects : 
Nonius : ' Observare ' . . . — 

But if you take a look at the fellow, how he 
ventures for his interest and for his realm j*^ 

" Apparently this satire is imitated from precepts of 
Archilochus. 

* sc. of senatorials. There may be an allusion to Tiberius 
Gracchus — cf. Marx, and Cichor., 146 ff. 

" i.e. his estates, qui perhaps nom. — 'who ventures.' 

249 



LUCILIUS 

775 
Nonius, 330, 11 : ' Induccre,' instituere, confirmare ... — 

aut quod animum induxit semel et utile omnino 
putat. 

776 
Nonius, 289, 9 : ' Deductum,' delectatione ductura ... — 

Illo oculi deducunt ipsi atcjue animum spes illuc 
rapit. 

777 
Nonius, 361, 27 : ' Proprium ' rursum significat perpetuum 
. . . (362, 17)— 

Cum sciam nihil esse in vita proprium mortali datum, 

778 
Nonius, 407, 31 : ' Tempestas,' tempus ... — 

iam qua tempestate vivo chresin ad me recipio. 

779 

Nonius, 286, 5 : ' Demissum,' humile, miserandum, abiec- 
tum . . . ■ — • 

re in secunda toUere animos, in mala demittere. 

780 
Nonius, 20, 29 : ' Cernuus ' dicitur proprie inclinatus . . . 
(21,6) . . .- 

mode sursum modo deorsum tamquam coUus cernui. 

Cp. Non., 200, 22. 

'"~8 coniunz. L. 

"8 chresin L certe sine odd. proh. M 

"" et in mala cdd. om. in Lu. I 

'8^* cernui cdd. 21 cernis cdd. 200 fortasse cernuus 

" or possibly ' or that which has once convinced his mind, 
and which he thinks . . .' perhaps ' or because he has . . .' 
'' Lines 777-8 are probably consecutive. 
<^ imitated from Archilochus, 66 Edmonds {L.C.L.). 

2^0 



BOOK XXVII 

775 
Nonius : ' Inducere,' to establish, confirm ... — 

or what he has once brought his mind to do " 
and thinks to be in every way useful. 

776 
Nonius : ' Deductum,' drawn by delight ... — 

Thither do their very eyes entice them ; thither 
hope hurries their minds. 

777 
Nonius : ' Proprium ' (one's own) again means everlast- 
ing ... — 

Since I know that nothing in this life is given to a 
mortal as his own for good, 

778 
Nonius : ' Tempestas,' time ... — 

and considering the times I live in, I nowadays 
take in my Lady UtiUty to live with.^ 

779 
Nonius : ' Demissum,' lowly, pitiable, downcast ... — 

to raise their spirits in good times, to make them 
low in bad."^ 

780 

Nonius : ' Cernuus ' in its proper sense means bent ... — 
now up, now down, like the neck of a stooping 
clown.*^ 

'^ I take this applying to a man's mind. Whatever cernuus 
may mean here, it is quite possible that we can join 779 
and 780. Surely cernui cannot mean ' of a sock (boot) ' 
here ; Nonius in two other quotations takes cernuus in the sense 
of stooping forward; and even here we might read cernuuo 
(the cdd. of Non. 200, 18 have cernis in another quotation 
of this same passage) as an epithet (bent, broken, lolling) 
oi collus. Cp. pp. 40-1, 

251 



LUCILIUS 

781 
Nonius, 302, 25 : * Ferre,' pati . . . — 
Certum est quidquid sit, quasi non sit ferre aequo 
animo ac fortiter. 

782 
Nonius, 269, 35 : ' Concedere,' credere vel consentire ... — 
id concedere unum atque in eo dare quo superatur 
manus. 

783 
Nonius, 368, 16 : ' Pernix ' significat celer ... — 
Fuimus pernices, aetemum id nobis sperantes fore. 

784 
Nonius, 384, 26 : ' Redire,' referri, revocari ... — 
Si non tamen ad te hoc redibit, tu hoc carebis con- 
modo. 

785 
Nonius, 29, 21 : ' Mediocritatem ' . . . — 
Paulo hoc melius quam mediocre, hoc minus malum 
quam ut pessumum. 

786 
Nonius, 300, 19 : ' Excidere,' dissentire ... — 
Metuo ut fieri possit; ergo antiquo ab Arciloco 
excido. 

'81 certum est H, C.Q., I, 154 ceterum cdd. proh. M 
quidquid cdd. quid L prob. M quasi Bern. 347, 357, 
Montepess., Ox. quid rell. quidquid sit, non sit Onions 
quid sit, quid non sit Mr. ferre Bouterwek fero cdd. 
ferre Lu. 1 

'82 id (yel mihi) Corpet in cdd. 

'83 nobis ed. pr. vobis cdd. 

'85 quam ut p. {vel sim.) cdd. quamst p. Mr. 

'8C antiquo M ego quom vivo Mr. ego vero (uo) 
C07ii. Linds. ergo quo Lu. G. ego vivo Gen. Bern. 83 

252 



BOOK XXVII 

781 
Nonius : * Ferre,' to suffer ... — 

I am determined, whatever it is, to bear it bravely 
with a steady mind, as though it did not exist. 

782 
Nonius: 'Concedere,' to believe or to agree . . . — 
to grant and to give way in that point alone in which 
he is overargued. 

783 
Nonius : ' Pernix ' means swift ... — 
We were quick, in the hope that that would be in 
store for us for ever. 

784 
Nonius : ' Redire,' to be brought back, to be called back 

Still, if this does not come back to you, you will 
have to do without that advantage.'^ 

785 
Nonius : ' Mediocritas ' . . . — 

This is a little better than middling, that is a little 
less bad than what you would call the worst. 

786 
A man refuses to listen to wise advice ? : 
Nonius : ' Excidere ' (fall out), to disagree ... — 
I fear it can't be done; so I fall out with old 
Archilochus.'^ 

" The sense is not clear. 

* cf. Archiloch., 74 {L.C.L.) xpTH^-o-rcov aeXTrrov ouSeV e'ariv ovh' 
(iTrcu/iOTOV ovSe davyLaaiov. . . . €k 8e tov /cat Tnara -navra, etc. 



LUCILIUS 

787 

Nonius, 301, 12 : ' Excludere,' liberare ... — 
. . . primum qua virtute servitute excluserit. 

788-9 
Nonius, 196, 18 : ' Chartara ' . . . masculini . . . — 

'P?;o-€i9 ubi, 
Graeci ubi nunc Socratici carti ? " Quidquid quaeritis, 
periimus." 

790 
Nonius, 320, 30 : ' Honor,' sepultura ... — 
nullo honore, heredis fletu nullo, nuUo funere. 

791-2 

Nonius, 308, 24 : ' Fingere,' conponerc ... 37, 26 : 
' Sedulo ' significat sine dolo ... — 

Rem, populi salutem fictis versibus Lucilius 
quibus potest inpertit, totumque hoc studiose et 
sedulo. 
Cp. Non., 37, 20. 

'*' virtute servitute cdd. servitutem edd. vetf. vir- 
tute <sese>servitute M 

788-9 pT^Q^Lg w nunc L nescis Lips nunc die B 

vestri coni. M haec si coni. Linds. nee si cdd. recc. 

nee sic rell. seclud. sic Terzaghi fortasse Graecae 

'*" heredis fletu Buecheler (fletu lun. al.) redis Munro 
taedis fletu L di ! sepultu' Mr. ludis M displetu 
cdd. nullo, nullo M nullo cdd. n. h. nullo heredis 

fletu nullo f. Linds. 

791 rem, populi L {proh. H, C.Q., I, 59; C, 144) te, Popli M 
item Popli Stowasser, W. St., XXVII, 214 re populi vel 
em populis Mr. item populi cdd. salutem cckl. 37, 27 
salute et cdd. 308 totumque h. s. e. s. add. ex Non., 37, 

28 sqq. 



BOOK XXVII 

787 

Nonius : ' Excludere,' to set free ... — 

firstly through what virtue he removed . . . from 
slavery. 

788-9 

Nonius : ' Charta . . .'of the masculine gender ... — 

Where are the dissertations ^ ? Now where are 
those Greek Socratic pamphlets? "Whatever you 
ask, we're done for." 

790 

Fate of the unioise : 

Nonius : ' Honor ' (mark of honour or respect), burial ... — 

with no act of honour, no sobbing of an heir, no 
funeral.^ 

791-2 

Dedication of hook XXVII ? or beginning of a satire ? : 

Nonius : ' Fingere,' to put together. . . . ' Sedulo ' means 
without guile ... — 

Something important — the people's health and 
prosperity — this is Lucilius' greeting imparted to 
verses such as he can write, and all this with hearti- 
ness and earnestness.*^ 

" But if nee sic is right (which is unlikely), then : — " and 
can't 5"ou save matters even thus ? " 

'' There is perhaps an allusion in this to Tiberius Gracchus 
(Cichor., 145-6) or some other famous man. 

*^ Lucihus seem to unite in one idea a general and a particular 
meaning of impertio (bestow on, impart to, with. dat. ; and 
impertire alicui salntem, to present with greeting). If te 
Popli is right then the book was addressed to Scipio (but cf. 
Cichor., 143-4); salwi may here be an expression of farewell; 
see Cic, Fain., VII, 32, 2. The derivation of sedulus from 
se-dolo is wrong. Usually placed at the beginning of book 
XXVII, this fr. must come after Hnes 744, 746, 753-4 
(sequence in Non., 37, 6, 11, 15, 20). 



LUCILIUS 



LIBER XXVIII 

Lucilius experimented here with all three of his usual 
metres. A sequence in Nonius shows that a satire in iambics 
was succeeded (not preceded, as Marx's scheme would make 

Sat. I. 

Attack by a Roman citizen (who tells the story) ■with 
some friends and slaves against the house of another, with 
threats by the latter of a lawsuit to come. The aggressor 

793 

Nonius, 275, 9 : ' Credere,' fidei committere. Lucilius lib. 
XXVIII— 

** vitam ac fortunas cui concrediderim meas." 

794 
Nonius, 121, 7 : ' Hornum,' ipsius anni ... — 
" utrum anno an horno tete abstuleris a viro." 

795 
Nonius, 268, 32 : ' Conficere,' frangere. Lucilius lib. 
XXVIII— 

" Malo hercle vestro, confectores cardinum." 

796-7 
Nonius, 414, 7 : ' Terga,' dorsa ... — 
" orationem facere conpendi potes ; 
salve, dum salvo in tergo et tergino licet." 

'^* tete Mr. res abstuleris L te abstinueris S 
tecum ]\I te abstuleris cdd. tute Leo fortasse ted 

'*' salve L solvi lun. salvi cdd. om. in Lu. 1 
et in tergino G. dum salvo tergo a tergino Mr. 

* The poet plays apparently on the words salve (here 
* good bye ' rather than ' good-day '), salvus and tergum 
(back), terginum (a whip made of hide). But perhaps we 



BOOK XXVIII 

BOOK XXVIII 

it) by one or two satires in septenarii; there was one satire 
in hexameters, but there is nothing to show where it was 
placed in the book. 

*SV/^ I. An occurrence in Home. 

appears to hunt out a faithless wife, and the scene may be 
modelled on an episode from a Greek play of the " New 
Comedy." 

793 

Nonius : ' Credere,' to give in trust. Lucilius in book 
twenty-eight — 

" the man to whom I entrusted my livelihood and 
fortunes." 

Seducer to erring wife ? : 

Nonius: ' Hornum,' of this very year . . . — 
" whether it was last year or this year that you 
stole yourself from your husband." 

795 

Bad language from one of the besieged party : 

Nonius : ' Conficere,' to break. Lucilius in book XXVIII 
has ' confectores ' — 

" By Hercules, to hell with you, you hinge- 
breakers ! " 

796-7 

Reply from the attacker : 

Nonius : ' Terga,' backs ... — 

" You can spare your language ! Be saved while 
you may, with a saving of your hide and raw- 
hide ! " ° 

should read solvi ' while you may be quit of this trouble . . . 
or possibly ' you can ... be quit {solvi) of speech. . . .' 

257 



LUCILIUS 

798 
Nonius, 239, 14 : ' Argutum,' audax, malitiosum . . . 
" Agite agite fures mendaci arguta manu." 

799 
Nonius, o");"), 26 : ' Ballistae,' saxa maiora et gravia ... — 
" Quid fit ? " " Ballistas iactant centenarias ! " 

800 
Nonius, 390, 4 : ' Submittere,' subdere, supponere ... — 
" Submittas alios siquos possis censeo." 

801 
Nonius, 206, 26 : ' Fulmentuni ' . . . ferainino ... — 

fulmentas t aeneis atque aeneis t subducere. 

802 

Nonius, 403, 29 : ' Subire ' significat ingredi ... — 
Pueri praeterea nostris qui subeant iubet. 

803 
Nonius, 506, 26 : ' Es ' pro ' esto ' . . . _ 

" Coice te intro ac bono animo es." 

'^^ arguta manu Buecheler, Rh., Mus., XLII, 473 argu- 
tamini cdd. prob. M 

''^^ quid vel qui cdd. fit vel sit cdd. sic T iactant 

L iactas ed. arm. 1480 prob. M iactans cdd. 

^'"' censeo D (I.) censeam Quich. censesis cdd. 

^^^ sene vis atque anu Mr. vcneis atque animeis L 
nasaque aeneis coni. Linds. aeneis (eis Flor. 3) atque 
aeneis cdd. fortasse atque eis aeneas 

^°^ coieite Lu. 1, G. conicite rell. coniice te Aid. 
coicito te L 

" but if argulamini is right, then we ought perhaps to 
translate : — ' prattle away with fibbing [tongue] to the liar' ; 
or it might be ' in a fibbing tricking company ' {manu). 

258 



BOOK XXVIII 

798 
The attack 'pressed : 

Nonius : * Argutum,' bold, ill- willed ... — 
" Come, get a move on, knaves all, smart and 
tricky now ^vith your hands ! " " 

799 
Nonius : ' Ballistae,' heavy stones of the larger sort ... — 
"What's up?" "They're throwing hundred- 
pound shot ! " ^ 

800 
Nonius : ' Submittere,' to bring under, put under ... — 
" I vote you shove some more under, if you can." 

801 

Nonius : ' Fulmentum ' . . . in the feminine ... — 
to pull away ^ supports. . . . 

802 
Nonius : ' Subire ' means to advance ... — 
He further gave orders that slave-boys should 
come up to help on our side. 

803 
Entry forced : 

Nonius : ' Es ' for ' esto ' . . . — 
" Get yourself inside, and keep your spirits up." 

'' I am doubtful about this, though hallista is certainly 
used of the missile (Plant., Trinumm., Ill, 2, 42; Sisenna, 
Hist., IV, as quoted also under this lemma by Nonius, is 
doubtful) ; Nonius' 77iss. have : — saxa maiora et gravia quibus 
iaciuntur ; perhaps he wrote quibus iaciuntur saxa e. q. s. ; in 
this case Lucihus would mean " they are violently working 
bahsters which can hurl hundred-pound shots." 

'^ hardly * to draw up,' ' raise.' 

259 

s2 



LUCILIUS 

804 

Nonius, 280, 11 : ' Dicere,' denuntiare ... — 
minitari aperte capitis dicturum diem. 

805-11 

Probus ad Verg., Ed., VT, 31 : Lucilius in XXVIII Saty- 
ranim— 

Hoc cum feceris, 
cum ceteris reus una tradetur Lupo. 
Non aderit ; dp^at? hominem et stoechiis simul 
privabit, igni cum et aqua interdixerit. 
Duo habet stoechia, adfuerit anima et corpore 
(y/} corpus, anima est Trvevixa) ', posterioribus 
stoechiis si id maluerit privabit tamen. 

812 

Nonius, 296, 18 : ' Exire,' evaderc, liberari ... — 
ne hoc faciat atque ex hac is aerumna exeat. 

813 

Nonius, 318, 21 : ' Habere,' audire ... — 
Habes omnem rem ; timeo ne accuser. 

808 privabit edd. p. eura Egnatius privabitur vel p. 

et cdd. 

®^" yrj Duebner xi C'^- -^^"■- ^^^^'^ ^^- ^^^^^ 

^^2 is erumna exeat Mr. aer. is exeat lun. proh. M 

crumna exeatis cdd. 



" diem dicere is ' to give notice of a day for trial.' 
'' Lucius Cornelius Lcntulus Lupus, whose own trial is 
described by Lucilius in book I (pp. 5 ff.). 

260 



BOOK XXVIII 

804 

Result of laying an accusation {a 'parody on philosophic 
discussion) : 

Nonius : ' Dicere,' to give notice of (a suit) ... — 
to threaten openly that he will lay an accusation " 
against him on a capital charge. 

805-11 
Probus : Lucilius in book XXVIII of the Satires has — 
WTien you have done this, he will be handed over 
with the other defendants to Lupus, Suppose he 
does not appear in court ; Lupus ^ will deprive the 
man of ' first beginnings ' and ' elements ' too, 
when he has forbidden ^ him the use of ' fire ' and 
' water,' He has still two elements, supposing he 
does appear in court, body and soul (body is ' earth,' 
soul is ' air ') ; none the less he will deprive him of 
these latter elements,*^^ if that's what he prefers. 

812 
Fears of the attacker : 

Xonius : ' Exire,' to escape, to be set free ... — 
SO that he may not do this, and that he may 
escape from his present trouble. 

813 
Nonius : ' Habere,' to hear , , , — 
You have the whole story ; I am afraid of being 
accused. 

<^ i.e. condemned him to banishment. In appals there may- 
be a double meaning ' first beginnings ' and ' ofl&ces, magis- 
tracies '; but stoechia, oToix^ia are simply ' elements.' 

^ sc. by execution. On this fr,, see Marx ; and Buecheler, 
Rk il/it.s„ XLIII, 292; Reitzenstein, i/., LIX, 6, 

261 



LUCILIUS 

814 

Nonius, 31, 23: ' Iiiritare ' dictum est proprie provocare 
Liicili, si in amore inritarit suo. 



Sat. II. 

815 

Nonius, 331, 4 : ' Ire,' accumbere ... — 

Chremes in medium, in summum ierat Demaenetus. 

816 
Nonius, 67, 14 : ' Pareutactoi ' . . . — 

ephebum quendam quern pareutacton vocant. 

817-8 
Nonius, 330, 30 : ' Interficere,' consumere, finire . . . 

" Piscium 
magnam atque altilium vim interfecisti." " At 
nego." 

819 
Nonius, 330, 30 : ' Interpcllare,' dicere, docere ... — 

" Verum tu quid agis ? Interpella me, ut sciam." 

^^* inritaris tuo Mr. 

^^^ ierat Roth ire ad cdd. (iere Escorial.) 

Non. 67, 14: XXVIII Mr. XX tuum efoebum cdd.; 
lib. XX non habet nisi hexametros 

^^^ pareutacton vocant Onions parectaton (praeutacton 
Lu. 1) V. cdd. 

8^* at Mr. haut Onions ut cdd. 

" cf. Cichor., 44 flf. He thinks that Lucilius visited Athens 
and as a student there heard lectures from these philosophers. 
Most of the satire seems to me to have been a dialogue at the 
banquet. 

262 



BOOK XXVIII 

814 

The following belongs to this satire : fear of the satirist's 
invective ? : 

Nonius : ' Inritare ' is a term properly used for to pro- 
voke ... — 

... of Lucilius, if he should vex him in his affairs 
of love. 

Sat. II. A Greek banquet {at Athens ?) ; 'philosophy dis- 
cussed.'^ 

815 
Nonius : ' Ire,' to recline at table ... — 
Chremes had gone to the middle, Demaenetus to 
the head couch of the feast. ^ 
816 
Nonius : ' Pareutactoi ' . . . — 

a certain stripling of the kind they call ' in train- 
ing.' '^ 

817-8 
The meal : 

Nonius : ' Interficere ' (kill), to consume, make an end 
of ... — 

" You have done ruin to a great mass of fish and 
fattened fowls." " But I deny it." 

819 
Discussions begin : 

Nonius : ' InterpeUare ' tell to, to inform ... — 
" But what are you up to? Come put in a word 
with me, so that I may know." 

'' Medium and summum are epithets of either : two out of the 
three lecti (couches) of the triclinium ; or : of the middle and 
left seats of any of the lecti. 

« See pp. 108-9. 



263 



LUCILIUS 

820 
Nonius, 478, 24 : ' Volam ' pro velim ... — 
" Eidola atque atomus vincere Epicuri volam." 

821 

Nonius, 410, 4 : ' Tristis,' doctus ... — 
" Adde eodem, tristis ac severus philosophus." 

822-3 
Nonius, 414, 17: ' Transmittere,' tradere, derelinquere 

" Polemon et amavit, morte hiiic transmisit suam 
scolen quam dicunt." 

824-5 

Nonius, 175, 22 : ' Subsicivum,' secundum, sequens . . . — 

" Praeterea haec subsiciva si quando voles 
opera ..." 

^22 Polemonem lun. Polemona L polemo(-n) et cdd. 
morte L mortem cdd. 

" eidola atque atomus, Greek ctStoXa Kal drofjiovs. The 
sense is not clear; I suspect that vincere is not the right 
reading here. The doctrines referred to are those of the 
formation of all solids from atoms, and the creation of sense 
by thin filmy images flowing from any solid to the organ of 
sense. 

264 



BOOK XXVIII 

820 
On philosophers ; Epicurus : 
Nonius : ' Volam ' for ' velim ' . . . — 

" I shall like Epicurus' images and atoms to 
carry the day." ^ 

821 
Xenocrates, rector of the Academy : 
Nonius : ' Tristis ' (mournful), learned ... — 
" Add to this again— he was a philosopher of 
mournful and severe looks." '^ 

822-3 

Polemo and Crates, rectors of the Academy : 

Nonius : ' Transmittere,' to hand over, to leave behind 

"And Polemo loved him, and on his death handed 
on to him his ' school ' <^ as they call it." 

824-5 

Philosophic studies ? : 

Nonius : ' Subsicivum ' (a remainder of land ' cut off ' in 
survejang), secondary, following ... — 

" Moreover if you Avill ever want these works 
which have been done in overtime ..." 

* cf. Diog. Laert., IV, 6 aefj-vos Se to. re dXXa 'EevoKpaT-qs 
Kal oKvdpwTTos aet. But read perhaps severos philosophus 
{^iXoaQ<j)ovs)- 

'^ Or read Polemonem amavit ' Crates loved Polemo ; 
Polemo on his death handed on. . . .' The reference here is 
to Crates (Diog. Laert., IV, 21, Kpar-qs . . . epcvpievos 
YloXepLcovos- dXXa Kal SieSe'^aro rrjv axoXrjv avrov) rather than 
to Xenocrates (Diog. Laert., I\', 19. . . . d lloXeixcov Kara 
TTavra e^rjXwKei rov 'E.evoKpa.Tqv. ov Kal ipaadijvai avrov (f)r]aLV 
WpicmTTTTos, i.e. pseud-Aristippus), who taught Polemo. 

265 



LUCILIUS 

826 

Nonius, 36, 29 : ' Pensurn ' significat exaequatum, quod 
sine inclinatione sunt quae penduntur ... — 

** nihil parvi ac pensi, uti litteras doceas lutiim." 

827 
Nonius, 37, 1 : ' Aqua intercus,' hydropum morbus ... — 
..." aquara te in animo habere intercutem." 

828 
Nonius, 496, 15 : Genetivus casus positus pro accusativo 

" cui saepe mille inposui plagarum in diem." 

829 
Nonius, 496, 15 : Genetivus casus positus pro accusativo 

" si argenti indiges." 
830 

Nonius, 384, 17 : ' Redundare ' abundare, superesse ... — 
*' Primo redundat aurum ac thensauri patent." 

^-^ parci L ac cdd. hoc Onions nil parvo huic 
pensi. Haut Mr. 

828 die Ribb. 

830 redundat Bern., 347, 357, Montepess., Ox. redundant 
rell. 

" The Latin is not clear, if it is right. Perhaps <habet 
. . . > I nihil ' he lays no slight or weight on it, so that you 
arc teaching . . .' Cf. Buecheler, Rh. Mus., XLIII, 292. 

266 



BOOK XXVIII 

826 

Some spurn wise teachincj : 

Nonius : ' Pensum ' (something weighed) means equally 
balanced, because things which are equally suspended show 
no dipping of the scale ... — 

" it's no slight thing, no level going," that you 
should teach mud how to read and write." 

827 

Nonius : ' Aqua intercus ' (water under the skin) the 
disease of dropsical persons * . , . — 

" that you have dropsy-water on the brain." 

828 

Nonius : The genitive case put instead of the accusative 

" on whom I have many a time rained a thousand 
blows to meet the day's need." ^ 

829 
Money is no safe possession ? : 
Nonius : The genitive case put instead of the accusative 

" if you are short of silver." 

830 

Nonius : ' Redundare ' (overflow), to abound, to be too 
much ... — 

" At first the gold overflows and treasuries lie 
open." 

* or 'one of the droj)sical diseases.' in aniino, 'in the mind.' 
•^ or simply ' every day.' 

267 



LUCILIUS 
831-2 

Nonius, 74, 11 : ' Armillum ' . . . — 

Hinc ad me hinc, licet; 
' anus russiim ad armillum.' " 

833 
Nonius, 278, 33 : ' Da,' die . . . (279, 4)— 
" Persuade et transi, vel da quam ob rem transeas." 

834 
Nonius, 250, 53 : ' Cedere,' recedere ... — 
" vel si alio opus sit, fore, si hinc aliquo cesseris." 



Sat. III. 

835 

Nonius, 237, 2 : ' Autumare ' est dicere ... — 
" Socraticum quidam tyranno misse Aristippum autu- 
mant . . ." 

^^^ hue . . . hue Leo a me D (F.) me ilicet Mr. 
833 persuade cdd. pervade Mr. vel cdcl. sed M 

^35 socratitum Gen., Bern. 83 socratium rell. Socrat- 
icum lun. quiddam Linds. quidam L quiddante 
cdd. misse Guietus misisse cdd. 

" For the proverb (on going back to old habits), cf. C.G.L., 
V, 6, 13; 48, 21, iirmillum, vns vinariiun unde anus ad 
nrmillum ; also a title of one of Phaedrus' fables — anus 
ad amphoram. Cp. Appul., il/., 9, 230, 22. Wliethcr wo 
have this fragment right or not, apparently a philosopher 
jeers at the man who falls back again and again into a be- 

268 



BOOK XXVIII 

831-2 

Backsliding ? 

Nonius : ' Armillum ' , . . — 

" Thence to me, thence — you're welcome; * back 
goes the old woman to the wine-pot.' " " 

833 
The following two fragments belong to this satire : 
Nonius : ' Da,' tell ... — 

" Persuade us and go over, or else give the reason 
why you are going over." ^ 

834 
Nonius : ' Cedere,' to withdraw ... — 
" or, if you need anything else, that you shall have 
it, if you take yourself away somewhere from here." 

Sat. III. Philosophical advice.'' 

835 
Nonius : ' Autumare ' means to say ... — 
" Some say that Socrates' disciple Aristippus 
sent to the tyrant ^ ..." 

setting sin as an old hag goes back to her tippling ; presumably 
riis-ium means ' again,' not ' red.' 

^ It is difficult even to guess at the meaning. Buecheler, 
Rh. Mils., XLIII, 293 thinks that crossing to Athens is referred 
to. It might mean going over to a different philosophical 
belief, vel seems to mean ' or at least.' 

<^ probably in the form of a dialogue (see 1. 836) between a 
youth and a man of experience (see 1. 837). 

^ so. Dionysius I of Syracuse, to whom he sent three books 
on Libyan history (Diog. Laert., II, 83); he also sent him 
a xP^i'a (id,, 84, Fiske, 161) i.e. a moral anecdote which is 
probably the work referred to here. We might read Socraticum 
quiddam — ' Aristippus sent something socratic ' (or ' a 
memorial of Socrates '). 

269 



LUCILIUS 

836 

Nonius, 248, 24 : ' Conmitterc,' coniungere, sociare ... — 
"Quid me fiet?" " Siquidem non vis te inprobis 
conmittere," 

837 
Nonius, 492, IS : ' Senectam ' pro senoctute ... — 
" Prospiciendum ergo in senectam iam nunc adules- 
centiaest." 

838-9 
Nonius, 379, 1 : ' Religiosos ' quoque dies infames vel 
infaustos ... — 

" anno vertenti dies 
tetri miseri ac religiosi." 

840 

Nonius, 328, 6 : ' lactare,' ambitiosius gloriari ... — 
" In re agenda, ipsa ridicula iactat se f deret f 

841 

Nonius, 175, 33 : ' Sarcinator ' . . . — 
" sarcinatorem esse summum, suere centonem 
.optume." 

842 
Nonius, 365, 39 : ' Pretium ' dicitur quod re empta datur 

. . . nee parvo f catullo f pretio 

^^"^ non vis {vel novis) te cdd. nunc vis te Vahlen 
novisti coni. Linds, 

83 7 senectam D (F.) senecta cdd. iam add. Mr. 
nunc ab adulescentia L nunc in a. Casaubon 

838 vertenti L vertente cdd. 

Non. 328 : XXVIII Mr. XVIII cdd. 

8*° iactat adque alia adserit Mr. (iactat atque lun.) 
constit. hexam. Linds.: in re agenda | ipsa ridicula idem iactetque 
(-tatque) adque sevcret (-at) ridicula id atque (adque 

Lu. 1) adsederet (adseret Bern. 83) cdd. 
270 



BOOK XXVIII 

836 
Nonius : * Committere,' to join together, to associate ... — 
" Wliat will become of me? " " Well, if you do 
not want to entrust yourself to rascals," 

837 
Nonius : ' Senecta ' for ' senectus ' . . . — 

" Therefore youth must look forward towards old 
age now, at once." 

838-9 

Nonius : ' Religiosi ' used as a term also of days of ill-report 
or unlucky ... — 

" in the turning year . . . hideous unhappy days 
of evil omen." " 

840 

Nonius : ' lactare,' to vaunt very boastfully ... — 

" In doing a job, even a laughable one, he boasts 

841 
Nonius : ' Sarcinator ' . . . — 

"to be a tip-top botcher, to stitch a patch-work 
excellently."^ 

842 

Nonius : ' Pretium ' is a term used for that which is 
given when a thing is bought ... — 

. . . and . . . at no small price. 

** allusion to the latter half of February, when there were 
' dies parentales.' 

" Not ' to be a handy man ' ? 

^*2 catuUo (capillo Cant. 1) cdd. catulum Mr. Catulo 
C catillo Mercier catula L satullo Loewe alii 

alia fortasse catillu' vel ... at ullo vel par vocat ullo 

271 



LUCILIUS 

843 

Nonius, 248, 31 : ' Conmittere,' facere ... — 

" Conmovet se nusquam neque conmittet, ut pereat 
sibi ..." 

Sat. IV. 
844 

Nonius, 226, 25 : ' Statura ' generis feminini ... — 
Qua re pro facie pro statura Accius . . . 

845 

Nonius, 308, 32 : ' Fingere,' jjarare ... — 
Sed fuga fingitur ; ut timido pede percitus vadit ! 

846-7 

Nonius, 395, 31 : ' Sumere ' est accipere, tollere ... — 
Omnia viscatis manibus leget, omnia sumet, 
omnia, crede mihi : presse res auferet omnis. 

Cp. Non., 332, 41. 



^*^ comraittit Quich., L 

^** Accius status raasculini, M. Tullius e. q. s. aid. Acci 
status {trih. Lucil. status) L Accius ' status ' Linds. 

**5 ut Mr. ac Acidal. fortasse et fingitur timido 
cdd. pede p. v. Acidal. v. p. p. cdd. 

846-7 <sumet> add. Bentin. <oinnia> crede Quich. 
presse cdd. prossus Buecheler prae se M prendet 

Leo res auferet omnes Popma presse auferet omnis et 
cdd. 

272 



BOOK XXVIII 

843 

Nonius : ' Conmittere,' to do . . . — 

" He makes no move nor will he so behave as 
to cause himself to lose ..." 

Sat. IV.« 

844 

Nonius : ' Statura,' of the feminine gender ... — 

Wherefore Accius, in proportion^ to his looks and 
stature, . . . 

845 

Nonius : ' Fingere,' to make ready ... — 

But he's making an escape ; see how with fearful 
foot he goes speeding along 



I c 



846-7 

Nonius : ' Sumere ' means to receive, take away ... — 

He will purloin everything with smeared hands, he 
will filch everything — everything, take my word 
for it ; he will carry off the whole lot riotously. 

" That the following fragments are part of a separate 
satire is shewn by their metre ; but we can trace no connected 
theme. Accius and probably other well-known Romans 
were apparently satirised. 

^ Accius the poet was a little man, but he had allowed a 
large statue of himself to be set up in the temple of the Muses 
{Remains of Old Latin, Vol. II, pp. xxi, 599). But the reading 
and the meaning of the fragment are in dispute. Cf. Marx, 
ad 794. 

'' The line suggests to me a scoffing imitation of some epic 
hexameter. 

273 
VOL. III. T 



LUCILIUS 

848 
Nonius, 406, 32 : ' Tollere ' est elevare . . . — 
Tanti se e tenebris montes eis aetera tollent. 

849-50 
Nonius, 25, 10 : ' Vatax ' et ' varicosus,' pedibus vitiosis 

ut si progeniem antiquani qua est Maximus Quintus, 
qua varicosus vatax. . . . 

851 

Nonius, 394, 16 : ' Spurcum ' etiam fetidum ... — 

quaeque aspectu sunt spurca et odore. 



LIBER XXIX 

That there were five satires in this book has been rightly- 
argued by ]\Iarx (see his proleg., CVII-CXI), but we must 
reverse his order ; the satires were written as follows : — 
I iambics, II mixed, III hexameters, IV iambics, V trochaics. 
(Nonius, 36, 5; 36, 10; 36, 18; 36, 25; 36, 27; cp. 245, 
18; 248, 8). The book shows clearly how deeply the poet 
had imbibed the hellenistic influences in the Roman society 
of his day. The meaning of many of the fragments is very 
obscure. INIarx denies that Lucilius ever used metres other 

^*^ tanti se e tenebris W tanti se nemoris M tantis e 
tenebris L tanti se Emporiis Palmer {Spic.) tanti so 
temporis odd. eis aetera Vahlen eij aWepa Linds. 

se in aethera L ad sidera Palmer. et faetera cdd. 
tantae se emporiis merces et faenera Mr. 

^^^ vacax qua varicosus vatax cdd. {vid. C, 154: ff.) 

" Here again we have perhaps an echo of an epic poem. 
The readings are quite uncertain. 

274 



BOOK XXIX 

848 
Nonius : * Tollere ' means to lift up . . . — 

Mountains so vast will raise themselves out of 
the darkness to the open sky." 

849-50 

Nonius : ' Vatax ' and ' varicosus,' having deformed 
feet . . .— 

as if ... an ancient lineage, from which have 
sprung Quintus Maximus ^ and the swell-veined 
splay-footed. . . . 

851 
Nonius : ' Spurcum ' (nasty) even means smelly ... — 
and things which are nasty to sight and smell. 

BOOK XXIX 

than senarii, septenarii, hexameters, and elegiac couplets ; 
but it seems to me that in one satire in this book, in which he 
quoted or parodied literary works, he did use metres for him 
unusual, but employed in the works he was satirising. Frag- 
ment no. 885 quoted from Ennius' Thyestes supports this 
view, but does not prove it, since the words can be put in 
septenarian metre. We should not forget that LucUius was 
experimenting in these earlier books. 



* Possibly Quintus Fabius Maximus Aemihanus (consul in 
145; brother of Scipio) or his son Allobrogicus (consul in 
121). Both served at Xumantia in Spain. Vatax (cp. 
Catax perhaps in book II, 72) possibly puns on some man 
named Vatia and Cichorius points to C. Servihus, father of 
P. Servihus Vatia (later Isauricus) — Cichorius, 154-7. Vari- 
cosus means perhaps straddle-footed here, and vatax may 
mean bandy-legged. 

275 
t2 



LUCILIUS 

Sal. I. 

852-3 

Nonius, 24, 5 : ' Ignominia ' est nominis nota. . . . Lucilius 
lib. XXIX— 

Apollost numen, qui te antiquis non sinet 
deliciis maculam atque ignominiam inponere. 

854 

Nonius, 318, 24 : ' Habere,' dirigere ... — 
Hue alio cum iter haberet praeteriens venit. 

855-6 

Nonius, 325, 35 : ' Indulgere,' augere ... — 

Tu qui iram indulges nimis 
manus a muliere abstinere melius est. 

857 
Nonius, 303, 12 : ' Ferre,' adferre . . . — 

colligere auxilium, tam etsi est indigna ut feram. 

858 
Nonius, 357, 12 : ' Obscenum ' significat et male dictum 

Deum rex avertat verba obscena ! 

859 

Nonius, 36, 2 : ' Subplantare ' dictum est pedem subponere 

* Subplantare ' aiunt Graeci. 

^^^ Deliacis Iun./orto55e rec/e delicis C(Zf?. 
^^^ a. m. a. lun. abstinere a muliere cdd. 
^^^ rex avertat T rixavertat EscoriaL, 11. 1 rixa 
vertat vertat rell. 



" or ' his favourite,' beloved,' sc. Hyacinthus, a boy loved 
by Apollo. 

276 



BOOK XXIX 

Sat. I. Friendship. 

852-3 

A. Brutal passions : 

Nonius : ' Ignominia ' means a mark against one's ' noraen.' 
name. . . . Lucilius in the twentj^-ninth book — 

There's a deity Apollo, who will not allow you to 
put stain and disrenown on your honest pleasures.** 

854 
Xonius : ' Habere,' to direct ... — 

Hither he comes in passing-, while he was keeping 
a journey to another place. 

855-6 
Xonius : ' Indulgere ' (indulge), to increase ... — 

You who indulge in anger too much — you had 
better keep your hands off the woman. 

857 
Nonius : ' Ferre,' to bring up . . . — 

to whip up a rescue party, even though she is 
unworthy of my bringing it.^ 

858 
Nonius : ' Obscenum,' means also ill spoken ... — 

May the king of gods turn aside words of bad 
omen ! 

859 

B , True frie ndsh ip . 

False friemls : 

Nonius : ' Subplantare ' is a term used for to trip up with 
the foot ... — 

The Greeks say ' to trip up the heels.' <^ 

* This means to me to be the meaning. But cf. Marx, 
ad9lQ. 

" viroaKeXiieiv. planta is the sole of the foot. 

277 



LUCILIUS 

860-1 

Nonius, 278, 9 : ' Delcnitus ' est mente alienatus ... — 
Concedat homini id quod velit, deleniat, 
corrunipat prorsum ac nervos omnes eligat. 

Cp. Non., 269, 33; 301, 9. 

862 
Nonius, 234, 23 : ' Aptus ' significat adeptus ... — 
ut si id quod concupisset non aptus foret, 

86a-4 
Nonius, 289, 29 : ' Deferre ' . . . — 
" Quapropter certum est facere contra ac persequi 
et nomen deferre hominis." 

865 
Nonius, 330, 20 : ' Insultarc,' iniuriosius aliquid dicere 

Insulta miserum tu quoque in me ! 

866 
Nonius, 288, 10 : ' Detrahere,' cxtrahere ... — 
cum ipsi in lutum descendant, cum alios detrahant. 

867-8 
Nonius,372, 24 : ' Producere ' dicitur longius ducere . . . — 

et si retinere hunc voles, 

si longius te producturum et diutius, 

^^^ prorsum (7.1 prorsus rell. et cdd. 301 

««2 foret add. D (I.) 

^"^ tu Passerat te cdd. 

^^'^ turn alios Bern., 347, 357, Monlepess., Ox. 

278 



BOOK XXIX 

860-1 

Nonius: ' Delenitus ' (soothed, softened down, captivated), 
means estranged from intelligence ... — 

Let him yield to the fellow what he wants, and 
soothe him down, utterly spoil him and pick out all 
his sinews. 

862 

Nonius : ' Aptus ' means having attained ... — 

SO that if he did not attain that which lie had 
eagerly desired, 

863-4 

Nonius : ' Deferre ' . . . — 

" \\Tierefore I am detemiined to do the opposite 
and prosecute the fellow and lodge a case against 
his name." 

865 

Nonius : ' Insultare,' to say something rather hurtful ... — 

You too ! Go on throwing insults at poor me ! 

866 

True friends : 

Nonius : ' Detrahere,' to pull out ... — 

since they go down themselves into the mire, and 
drag others out of it." 

867-8 

Nonius : ' Producere ' is a term for to draw out longer ... — 

and if you want to retain him, and if . . . that 
you will drag out the business any further, any 
longer, 

° Thus I translate in the light of Nonius' lemma. But 
by itself the fragment would express reckless men dragging 
others down to ruin with them, rather than bold rescuers of 
the fallen. The second cum may mean ' although.' 

279 



LUCILIUS 

869 

Nonius, 351,20: ' Nobilis ' dicitur et notus . . . (352,4)— 
Turn ilhid eTTLcfxLveL quod etiamnum nobile est. 

870-1 
Nonius, 36, 8 : ' Coniugare,' copulare, dictum est a 

. . . quam mihi quantum est inter humanum genus 
rerumque inter se coniugat communicat ! 

872 
Nonius, 360, 29 : ' OfFerre,' adferre . . . — 
ut nunc in hac re mihi opem atque auxilium ofFeras. 

873 

Nonius, 364, 1 : ' Periculum ' est salutis discrimen ... — 
Adde alios omnes meo periclo ex ordine. 

874 
Nonius, 110, 28 : ' Favitorem ' . . . — 
Favitorem tibi me, amicum, amatorem putes, 

875-6 
Nonius, 315, 29 : ' Grave,' neeessarium ... — 
habeasque in animo mi admodum causam gravem 
fore quae me ab ullo commodo abducat tuo. 

®''* i7TL(f>u)U€t D (I.) eVe0a»vei Mr. epifoni cdd. (cpi- 

tofoni Lti.) etiamnum D (I.) etiamnunc Madvig 

etiara turn cdd. 

^'" quam mihi cdd. cum amicis M quam mi ille Mr. 

^'^ rerumque cdd. rerum quae M ferumque Mercier 
coniugat Bentin, coniungat [ilem in lemm.) cdd. coniun- 
gant M 

®" uti L in add. Quich. 

874-8 coniunx. D (F.) 

8'^ habeasque in Onions habeas quoque Mr. habe- 
asque (quae) cdd. 

280 



BOOK XXIX 

869 
Other fragments : 

Nonius ' Nobilis ' is used also for well known . . . 
And now for envoi utter the famous moral, which is 
well knoMTL even to this day." 

870-1 

Nonius : ' Coiugare,' to tie together, is a term derived 
from ' iugum ' (yoke) ... — 

See how he shares with me as much as mankind 
enjoys, and all that men make binding among 
themselves ! * 

872 
Nonius : ' Offerre,' to bring to . . . — 
that you may bring help and aid to me now in 
this business. 

873 
Nonius : ' Periculum ' means a hazarding of safety ... — 
At my risk take all the rest besides in order. 

874 
Nonius : ' Favitorem ' . . . — 
Believe me to be your admirer, friend, and lover, 

875-6 
Nonius : ' Grave ' (weighty, important), necessary ... — 
and bear in mind that it will be a very weighty 

reason in my case which could draw me away from any 

advantage of yours. 

" Cichor., 178. Perhaps the saying was koivo. (f>iXajv; see 
next fr. 

*• very uncertain. 

28t 



LUCILIUS 

877 

Nonius, 364, 5 : ' Periculum,' experimeutum . . . 
cuius sei in periclo feceris periculum, 

878 
Nonius, 252, 14 : ' Carpere,' celeriter practerire ... — 
Hiemem unamquamque carpam. 

Sat. II. 
879 
Nonius, 30, 22 : ' Exordium ' est initium ... — 
verum tristis contorto aliquo ex Pacuviano exordio. 



880 

Nonius, 171, 2 : ' Signatam ' virginem vetustas voluit 
dicere ... — 

primum Crysi cum negat signatam gnatam reddere. 

^"^ se vel si cdd. sine Francken 

878 hieme M 

8 "8 varum Mercier utrum lun. virum cdd. 

880 primum D(F.) prima Onions primam cdd. 

signatam <natam> B < gnatam > coni. Linds. sic 
natam Schmitt se gnatam r. Mercier redere cdd. 

redire 0. 1 recedere Onions 



« See Remains of Old Latin, Vol. II, pp. 192 £F. 
'' Agamemnon. 

* Astynorac, daughter of Chryscs. Hygin., Fah., 121, 
perhaps summarises this prologue : ' cum Chryses ad Agamcm- 

282 



BOOK XXIX 

877 

Nonius : ' Periculum ' (experiment, trial), test ... — 
of whom if you will make trial in time of trial, 

878 

Nonius : ' Carpere ' (pluck, gather, tear off), to pass 
quickly ... — 

Let me pluck each winter's fruits. 

Sat. II. Attack on tragedy and comedy. 

879 

A. Tragedy, (i) Pacuvius, ' Chryses.'' " 

Think of Pacuvius^ prologues : 

Nonius : ' Exordium ' (warp of a web ; prologue) means a 
beginning ... — 

but a gloomy fellow from some tangled prologue 
of Pacuvius. 

880 

For example the prologue {?) of his ' Chryses ' ; 

Nonius : By ' signatam ' (sealed, undefiled) antiquity meant 
to express a maiden ... — 

at first when he ^ denied that he would giv-e back 
Chryses' virgin daughter '^ to her father virgin-sealed. 

nonem deprecandum venisset ut sibi filiam redderet, non 
impetravit. Ob id Apollo exercitum eius partim fame 
partim morbo totum consumpsit. Itaque Agamemnon 
Chryseida gravidam sacerdoti remisit. Cp. Euripides in 
Ilypsipyla eu^vy/xa Kal ad Kal KaTeacfipayiofjieva. It is possible 
that ■■signatam, means marked, defiled. Translate perhaps : 
' When he refused to give back . . .' Hardly : ' When he 
denied that . . . was virgin-sealed when he gave her back.' 

283 



LUCILIUS 

881 

Nonius, 27, 7 : ' Extenninatum ' est praeter terminos 
niissum ... — 

nei rediret ad se atque illam exterminaret miseriam. 

882-3 

Nonius, 31, 15 : ' Sudum ' dictum est quasi semiudum, ut 
est aer post pluvias serenus et liquidus ... — 

nec ventorum flamina 
flando suda secundent. 

884 
Nonius, 205, 23 : ' Fretuni ' . . . masculini . . . Lucilius — 

Serena caeli numina et salsi fretus. 

Cp. Charis., ap. G.L., I, 129, 6 K. 

885 
Nonius, 405, 2 : ' Spargere,' madefaeere ... — 

latere pendens saxa spargens tabo sanie et sanguine 
atro, 
Cp. Cic, Tmc. Disp., T, 44, 107. 

^^^ niLu. ne G., al. exteTuima,Tet ed. princ. exter- 
minare cdd. miseriam cdd. recc. miseram rell. 

miserulam Quietus, Mr. 

882 suda secundent cdd. suda iter secundent M 

884 Serena caeli ed. princ. caeli serena M Ahh. Sachs. 
Ak. d. IF., Phil.-IIist. KL, XXVII, 107 scrana caecaeli 
Lii. caeciliG. nxxmma, ed.prin.c. momina L lumina 
Mr. numine M nomine cdd. nomina Flor. 3 

885 Lucilius XVIII latere cdd. XXVIII *** Ennius 
Thyeste, latere Mr. 

<» Perhaps Pacuvius' Chryses is again suggested here, and 
the person referred to might be Agamemnon. But if the 
corrupt miseram in Nonius is an iirtruded gloss on some other 
word meaning wretched, then perhaps the sense is : — ' if 
Agamemnon Mould not send Chryseis (Astynome) out of his 
land so as to return to Chryses, then . . .' 

284 



BOOK XXIX 

881 

Nonius : ' Exterminatum ' means sent beyond the boun- 
daries (termini) ... — 

Unless he came to his own self again, 

And banished out of bounds that wretchedness." 

882-3 
(ii) Enniiis, ' Thijestes.' 
Thy est es' threat : 

Nonius : ' Sudum ' was used, we may say, for ' semiudum ' 
(half wet), just as the air is calm and limpid after rain- 
showers ... — 

nor may clear breezes blow favourable ^ with their 
gusts. 

884 

Nonius : ' Fretum ' ... of the masculine. . . . Lucilius — 
The serene godheads of the sky and the salt sea.<^ 

885 
Nonius : ' Spargere ' (bespatter), to make wet ... — - 
He hanging by his flank and spattering 
The rocks with gore, with mess of black-hued 
blood,'^ 

'' At first sight the Latin looks like a hexameter or two 
incomplete hexameters, but cf. Marx ad 872; Cic, Tusc, 
I, 144, 107 Ut naufragio pereat Atreus ! — a threat of Thyestes. 
See Remains of Old Latin, Vol. I, pp. 354-5. 

<= The fragment is a whole senarius or part of a septenarius. 
It seems to fit well as placed here and in this satire of mixed 
metres a senarius is not out of place. 

^ Certainly from Ennius' Thyestes — Cic, Tusc, I, 44, 107, 
where Cicero's quotation shews that Ennius wrote these words. 
The metre was not septenarian, but Lucilius may have 
written this fragment as one septenarius with a word over. 
Cf. Remains of Old Latin, Vol. I, pp. 354-5. 

285 



LUCILIUS 
886 

Nonius, 489, 14 : ' Nefantia ' pro nefanda ... — 
. . . dissociata aeque omnia ac nefantia. 

Cp, Varro, Sciamackia, jrepl TV(f>ov, 509B (Non., 489, 19-21). 

887-8 

Nonius, 275, 4 : ' Credere ' est fidem habere dictis vel factis. 
. . . Lucilius lib. XXIX— 

Hymnis, velim 
te id quod verum est credere. 



Nonius, 330, 9 : ' Induccre,' persuadere. Lucilius lib. 
XXIX— 

Hymnis, ego animum sic induce, quod tu ab insano 
auferas . . . 

890-1 
Nonius, 19G, 11 : ' Consortionem ' feminini . . . — 
Deierat se non scripsisse et post non scripturum; 

redi 
in consortionem. 

^^^ dissociata Quietus aeque Fruter. dissociataque 
Buecheler proh. M dissociat atque cdd. 

Non., 276, 4 : XXVI vel XXVII cdd. XXVIII Mr. 

XXIX M 

8^^ te cdd. tete Mr. te mi Onions fortasse ted 

Non., 330 : XXVIII ighymnis Lu. Gen. Bern. 83 XXVIII 
hymnis G. al. XXVIII Hymnis Mr. 

88^ sic cdd. si M 

^^^ deierat se non W. Baehrens, H., LIV, 80 deira te 
non C 168-9 deirat enim sc Mr. enim non Havet 
deirat enim scripsisse (scribsisse scribse) cdd. 

<* Probably from Thyesies, certainly from a tragedy; 
dissociata probably translates oLKoivcovrjTa, ' unsocial,' ' in- 

286 



BOOK XXIX 

886 
Nonius : ' Nefantia ' for ' nefanda ' . . . — 
all alike repugnant and unspeakable." 

887-B 

B. The Netv Come/ly. (i) Caecilius, ' Hymnis.' * 

Nonius : ' Credere ' means to have faith in things said or 
done, . . . Lucilius in book XXIX " — 

Hymnis, I should like you to believe what is the 
truth. 

889 

Nonius : ' Inducere,' to persuade. Lucilius in book 
XXIX ''— 

Hymnis, thus do I make up my mind, that what 
you steal from the crazy . . . 

890-1 
Nonius : ' Consortio,' a feminine form ... — 
He swears he did not write it and that he won't 
\\Tite it in future ; come back to consortship ! ^ 

human,' ' not to be communicated,' ' outcast ' (Cic, ad Att., 
VI, 3, 7; VI, 1,7). 

^ See Remriins of Old Latin, I, 490 flf. Baehrens, H., LIV, 
79-80 ; LuciKus seems to apply the name Hymnis to a mistress 
of his with whom he had quarrelled. 

" Nonius' mss. vary between XXVII and XXVI ; but since 
the lemma comes between one provided by book XXVIII 
and one by book XXX, it must belong to XXVIII or XXIX 
(for XXX has hexameters only). If we read, e.g. tete, it 
might be a senarius, but since Hymnis was apparently a 
theme of Lucilius in septenarii of book XXIX, I have fol- 
foUowed Marx. 

^ This number seems to be right for palaeographical 
reasons ; see appar. crit., and Marx, ad 894. 

^ The reading and the meaning are uncertain. 

287 



LUCILIUS 
892 

Nonius, 369, 37 : ' Putare,' aestiraare ... — 

" Perge, amabo, ac si pote face dignam me lit vobis 
putem." 

893-5 
Nonius, 289, 32 : ' Destinare ' emere . . . — 

" Faeio. 
" Ad lenonem venio, tribus in libertatem milibus 
destinor." 

896 

Nonius, 107, 26 : ' Eugium,' media pars inter naturalia 
muliebria. Lucilis in [epodis] — 

Hymnis sine eugio f ac destina f. 

897 

Nonius, 360, 33 : ' Obducere,' aperire ... — 

Vos interea lumen auferte atque aulaea obducite. 

Varro, L.L., VI, 69 : ' Spondere ' est dicere ' spondeo ' a 
' sponte ' . . . itaque Lucilius scribit de Cretaea, cum ad se 
cubitum venerit, sponte ipsam suapte adductam ut tunicam 
et cetera reiceret. 

^•2 pote L potes cdd. fortasse potis 

*93 facio <cito> Mr. <ilico> M 

8'* veno coni. Linds. destinor W destino Acid. prob. 
M destiner cdd, 

Non., 107, 26 : in epodis hymnis sine eugio ac destina cdd. 
in epodis seel. Mr. sine podice Hymnis si sine eugio, | ac 
destinas M eugio accipi mc ac Mr. age, destina Ribbeck 
atque destina Terzaghi trib. lib. XXIX W 

Varro : senarios cum ad me cubitum venerat | sponte 
ipsa suapte adducta ut tunicam et cetera | reiceret L sep- 
tenarios cum ad me cubitum venerat | sponte est ipsa suapte 
e. q. s. coni. W ex lib. XXIX ? 

288 



BOOK XXIX 
892 

Nonius : ' Putare,' to appraise ... — 

Please go on, and if you can, bring it about that 
I can count myself worthy of you men." 

893-5 

Nonius : ' Destinare ' (set up, put up, destine), to buy 
(reaZZy 'intend taking ') . . . — 

" I do it; I come to the pimp. I am put up for 
sale into freedom at three thousand." ^ 



Nonius : ' Eugiura,' a part within the private parts of a 
woman. Lucilius in . . . — 



Hymnis without maidenhead 



897 

Nonius : ' Obducere ' (draw over, draw across), to open 

Meanwhile, you there, away with the light, and 
draw the curtains across. 

Varro : ' Spondere ' is to say ' spondeo ' (I promise) from 
' sponte ' . . . and thus it is that Lucihus writes about 
Cretaea,*^ that when she came to his house to lie with him, 
she was led ' sponte ' of her own free will to cast aside her 
tunic and the rest. 

" sc. drachmarum; cf. also Cichor., 172; Baehrens, H., 
LIV, 79. 

^ text probably corrupt ; destina is possibly a ' support ' 
here, as in Amob., II, 92 ; Vitr., V, 12, 3, but what LuciUus 
may have meant by it in this sense I do not know. 

<^ Cretaea : ' Cretan woman,' used as a proper name. 

289 
VOL. III. U 



LUCILIUS 

898-9 

Donatus, ad Ter., Phonn., IV, 3, 9 : ' Commoduiu,' tantum 
quod. Lucilius — 

Milii commodum 

statuerat dare, vestimenta et in toro reposueram. 

900 
Nonius, 274, 11 : ' Conducere ' . . . — 
mango, non magna mercede, magno quod conduxeris. 

901-2 

Nonius, 294, 9 : ' Explorare ' . . . — 

Certum scio 
esse ita ut dicis ; nam mihi erant de illo explorata 
omnia. 

903 

Nonius, 36, 14 : ' Emungi ' ex manifesta significatione 
manat ... — 

in me illis spem esse omnem, quovis posse me emungi 
bolo. 

898-899 iril^ lll^ XXIX W 

^*^ fortasse < so > mihi 

8^' statuerat M est aut cdd. vestimenta et in toro 
reposueram W iam vestimenta posueram coni. M vesti- 
mentor posueram cdd. (vestimentotum vestimenta 
reposueram V) 

*°° mango Mr. magno cdd. prob, M mercedest Mr. 

^°^ in me illis lun. in mellis odd. bolo Carrio 

volo cdd. 

290 



BOOK XXIX 

898-9 

Donatus : ' Coramodum,' only just. Lucilius — 

She had just decided to give herself to nie, and 1 
had ah'eady put down my clothes upon the bed. 

900 

(ii) A scene from a coinedy unknown ; a bad cashier. 

a talk about business : 

Nonius : * Conducere ' . . . — 

monger," that which you have hired at a great 
price will bring you no great revenue. 

901-2 
Nonius : ' Explorare ' . . . — 

1 know that it is a sure thing as you say; for I 
had looked into everything which had to do with 
that fellow. 

903 

Nonius : ' Emungi ' is a term which springs from something 
whose meaning is manifest ... — 

that all their hopes lie in me, that I can be diddled 
out of any haul I have made.^ 

<* Mango may be wrong here. If it is right, Lucihus makes 
a pun on mango, magno. 

* or possibly ' that any bait can be used to pull my leg ' ; 
bolus can mean (a) a throw at dice; (b) a east of a fishing-net, 
with extensions of meaning implying gain or loss; (c) a tit- 
bit. Emungere is properly to wipe the nose, here to ' deceive,' 
' diddle.' 

291 
u2 



LUCILIUS 

904-5 

Nonius, 472, 5 : ' Palpatur ' . . . — 

hie me ubi 
videt, subblanditur palpatur caput scabit pedes legit. 
Cp. Fest., 258, 19. 

906 
Nonius, 283, 29 : ' Ducere,' volvere, pertractare ... — 

Age nunc summam sumptus due atque aeris simul 
adde alieni. 

907 
Nonius, 74, 3 : ' Aera,' numeri nota. ... — 
Hoc est ratio ? Perversa aera summae et subducta 
inprobe. 

908 
Nonius, 399, 11:' Subducere,' subputare . . . 
Eodem uno hie modo rationes omnes subducent suas. 



sos-e hie . . . palpatur Birt, Rh. Mus., LXXI, 272-3 
secundum cdd. ubi me vidit Fest. hie me ubi videt | 

subblanditur <fur> palpatur M Jortasse suppalpatur. 
pedes legit add. ex Fest. 

^"^ subdue Leo aeri (aeris lun.) simul adde alieni cdd. 
adde alieni aeris simul Mr. aeris alieni simul ] a. M 

*"'' haec ed. princ. summae et subducta W summae 
subducta S summa est Casaubon summa et subducta 

cdd. 

'"^ rationes cd. vet. Dousae crrationes rell. rationes 
omnes Mr. (qui et r. aeris coni.) subducent lun. subducet 
cd. vet. Dousae subduceret cdd. rell. 

292 



BOOK XXIX 
904-5 

Nonius : ' Palpatur ' . . . — 

when this fellow sets eyes on me, he caresses me 
gently, pats me lightly, scratches my head, gathers 
the hce.'* 

906 
Examining accounts : 

Nonius : ' Ducere ' (count, ' tot up '), to ponder, scan 
through ... — 

Come now, tot up the debit side, and add too the 

sum of the debts. ^ 

907 
Nonius : ' Aera,' « a mark expressing a number ... — 
Is this what you call accounting? The figure for 

the total is falsified and counted up dishonestly ! 

908 
Nonius : ' Subducere,' to count up . . . — 
In this one and only way will they then reckon 
up all their accounts. 

« Cf. Birt, Rh. Mus., LXXI, 272-3. Pedes legere 
was a job given to specially employed persons whose duty it 
was to pick the pests from their employers. Pedes legit 
is added here from Festus, 258, 19; the expression can alsor 
mean ' shuffle (pick up) the feet.' I 

^ As it appears in the mss. this line is in anapaestic metre, 
but it can be changed into a septenarius by slight transposi- 
tions of words. Yet why should not Lucilius have introduced 
a passage in a rapid metre ? 

<^ aera, fern, sing., mostly late Latin for an item of an ac- 
count ; but classical writers used for such items aera (neut. plur. 
of r/e.5), ' counters.' Hence perhaps Nonius is wrong in taking 
aera as fem. sing, and the reading summa et siiMucta right — 
' the items are all wrong, and the sum-total counted up 
dishonestly.' 

293 



LUCILIUS 
909 

Nonius, 287, 8 : ' Distrahere ' est vcndcre ... — 
" dividant differant dissipent distrahant." 

Sal. III. 
Fornix 
Arnobius, II, 6 : Fornicem Liicilianura et Marsyam 
Pomponi obsignatum memoria continetis. 

910-1 

Nonius, 238, 5 : ' Adtendere ' est intendcre ... — 
praeterea ut nostris animos adtendere dictis 
atque adhibere velis. 

912 
Nonius, 383, 13 : ' Rogare,' instituere ... — 
consilium patriae legumque oriundus rogator. 

913-5 
Nonius, 153, 14 : ' Permities,' periculura, exitium ... — 

Nunc tu 
contra venis, vel qui in nuptis voluisse neges te 
nee sine permitie ? 

^^^ nostris Bentin. nostros cdd. 

Non. 383, 13 : trib. lib. XXIX M XXVIII Mr. XXVII 
cdd. 

*^* voluisse C 160 noluisse coni. M belle esse L 
versere Mercier versasse Linds. vel sese cdd. 



" or ' sell by retail.' If this (in cretic metre) is not what 
Lucilius wrote, then the quotation from this poet must have 
dropped out of Nonius' text; I take it that it at any rate 

294 



BOOK XXIX 

909 
Nonius : ' Distrahere ' means to sell ... — 
" let them share out, scatter, squander, sell up." ^ 

Su!. III. ' The Brothel.'' On the subject of choosing a 
tvonian ; addressed to a friend of rank and promise. 

Title : 

x4mobius : You hold stamped on your memories The Brothel ^ 
of Lucilius, and Marstjas of Pomponius. 

910-1 

Lucilius begs a hearing : 

Nonius : ' Adtendere ' means to strain towards ... — 
moreover that you may be pleased to give and 
bend your mind to my words. 

912 
Because of his friend's future ? 
Nonius : ' Rogare,' to constitute ... — 
a rising proposer of his country's counsels and 
laws. 

913-5 
A. Behaniour ioivards married women : 
Nonius : ' Permities,' danger, mischief ... — 
Now do you come forward with an objection? 
You indeed when you deny that you have lusted after 
married women, and not without mischief either ? 

ended in distrahant. But Lucihus may weU have used even 
this metre, unusual for him, in dealing with a scene from the 
' New Comedv.' 

* Hilberg, '^Wien. Stud., XXV, 156, thinks that the word 
applies to Lucilius' poetry as a whole ; a Christian might well 
have used it so; but the addition of Pomponius' Marsyas 
favours a particular reference, and 1 think that this satire 
of book XXIX has the best claim. 

295 



LUCILIUS 

916 

Nonius, 271, 18: ' Convenire,' interpellare . . . — 
" Haec turn conventus tela insidiasque locavi." 
Cp. Non., 340, 29. 

917-^ 

Nonius, 36, 21 : ' Collare ' est vinculi genus quo collum 
astringitur ... — 

** cum manicis catulo collareique, ut fugitivum, 
deportem." 

919-20 
Nonius, 300, 21 : ' Eiectum ' dictum exclusum ... — 

ubi erat u u copia - u 
eicere istum abs te quamprimum et perdere amorem. 

921-2 

Nonius, 290, 2 : ' Docere,' dicerc ... — 
At non sunt similes neque dant. Quid si dare 

vellent ? 
Acciperesne ? Doce. 

Xon., 271 : lib. XXIX cdd. XXVIII aid. 340 

»i6 hie D (I.) 

®^' collareque cdd. fortasse catulum collareique 

^^^ ubi G. ibi rell. erit coni. Mr. u o copia -o W 
Komwaa Mr. scopus lun. kopioscs L scabiosus 

coni. M scabiosum Schmitt scopios vel scopiose cdd. 
speciosa vel speeiose Onions ibi erat okottos {anajxiest.) 

Havet 

'2^ si ed. princ. sin ]\Ir. sint cdd. 

*^- acciperesne cd. N. Fabri acciperisne Lu. I, Gen., 
Bern. 83 acceperisne rell. 

296 



BOOK XXIX 

916 

A past experience ; an injured husband ? : 

Nonius : ' Con venire,' to accost ... — 

" Thus accosted, I then placed these weapons 
and laid an ambush." " 

917-8 

Nonius : ' CoUare ' is a kind of fetter for fastening the neck 
tightly . . . — 

" when I fetch him home like a runaway in hand- 
cuffs and a dog-chain ^ and a dog-collar." 

919-20 

Nonius : ' Eiectum ' is a term used for kept out ... — 

when there were ways and means [you ought to 
have] cast that love away from you and destroyed it 
forthwith. 

921-2 
B. Behaviour towards maidens. 
Nonius : ' Docere,' to tell ... — 

But they are not like other women, nor do they 
offer you their charms. WTiat if they choose to do 
so ? Would you accept ? Tell me. 

" Marx thinks of a man accosted by a prostitute; Fiske, 
262, makes the speaker a woman and takes conventus as a 
gen. sing, ('hour of assignation'); it is not even certain 
whether the fragment belongs to book XXIX or to book 
XXVIII, where it might well be placed in Sat. IV of that book ; 
see above, pp. 272 ff. 

** this seems to be the meaning of catulus here. But I 
suggest reading catidum — ' Hke a runaway puppy.' 

297 



LUCILIUS 
923-4 

Nonius, 391, 3") : ' Stare,' erigi, prominere ... — 
Hie corpus solidum invenics, hie stare papillas 
pectore marmoreo. 

925 
Nonius, 220, 2 : ' Polypus ' generis feminini ... — 
Paulisper comedent iam eadem haec se ut polypus 
ipsa. 

926 

Festus, 410, 5 : ' Suppum ' antiqui dicebant quern nunc 
' supinum ' dicimus . . . eius vocabuli meminit etiam 
Lucilius — 

Si vero das quod rogat et si suggeris suppus, 

927-8 
Nonius, 313, 8 : ' Plagitium ' . . . — 
Quae et poscent minus et praebebunt rectius 

multo 
et sine flagitio. 

®25 comedent iam eadem L comedcns edet S come- 

dent iam haec sese Mr. cui ] paulisper me dem, iam edet 
M cui medemtia medem cdd. 

92' frlb. lib. XXIX M quae et C 162 quei Mr. 
qui ct Mercier prob. M quiete cdd. 

" The Latin is very corrupt. Paulisper perhaps eiids a 
clause or sentence not given by Nonius. For other inter- 

298 



BOOK XXIX 
923-4 

C. Behaviour toioards freedwamen who are costly harlots. 
Nonius : ' Stare,' to be raised np, to project ... — 

Here you will find a firm full body and breasts 
standing out on a marble-white chest. 

925 

Nonius : ' Polypus ' of the feminine gender ... — 

For a little while now these same creatures will 
devour their very selves like a cuttle fish.<* 

926 

Festus : The archaic writers used to employ the term 
' suppus ' for such as we now call ' supinus ' ... of this 
word Lucilius moreover makes mention — 

But if you give what she asks, and you bear your 
load lying on your back, 

927-8 

D. Behaviour towards common icomen of the brothel : 
Nonius : ' Flagitium ' . . . — 

Women who will ask for less and also make their 
offers with much more propriety and without 
reproach.^ 

pretations see Marx, and Fiske, 163; cp. Cichor., 161. 
Nonius is probably wrong about polypus ; I take ipsa as a 
neuter plural. 

^ Lucilius apparently advocates the brothel in preference 
to other ways of satisfying lust. But the fragment is not 
certain; if qui is right, it refers to male prostitutes who would 
be in no clanger oi flagitium, scandal [sc. of an illegitimate 
child). 

299 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. III. 
929-30 

Nonius, 74, 8 : ' Advocassc ' pro vocasse ... — 
Amicos hodie cum inprobo illo audivimus 
Lucilio advocasse. 

931-3 

Nonius, 383, 21 : ' Remissum,' missura ... — 

Cohibet domi 
maestus se Albinus, repudium quod filiae 
remisit. 

Cp. Non., 350, 32. 

934 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 96, 15 K : ' Nemo ' . . . antiqui et 
pro ' nullo ' saepe posuerunt, ideoque ' nemo ' dicentes quasi 
minus significarent et ' homo ' addebant, ut. . . . Lucilius 
XXIX . . .— 

** Quis tu homo es ? " ** Nemo sum homo." 

935 
Nonius, 381, 19 : ' Referre,' reddere ... — 
" Quod te intromisi gratiam referat mihi." 

936-7 

Nonius, 384, 5 : ' Recipere,' revocare ... — 
" primum ex advorso siquod est cenaculum 
quo recipiat te." 

935 referas D (I.) 

" So far as we can tell, this satire contained a mixture of 
various themes among which wc can trace no connexion; but 
the whole may have been put in the form of a conversation 
at a dinner. 

300 



BOOK XXIX 

Sat. iir.« 
929-30 

(i) A dinner. Lucilius to attend : 
Xonius : ' Advocasse ' for ' vocasse ' . . . — 
We have heard that he has invited some friends 
including that rascal Lucilius. 

931-3 
Albinus declines : 

Nonius : ' Remissum,' the same as ' missum ' . . . — 
Albinus ^ confines himself to his house in sorrow, 
because the man has sent a bill of divorce to his 
daughter. 

934 

Charisius : Again the archaic writers often put ' nemo ' 
for 'nullus,' and therefore when using the term 'nemo,' as 
though they expressed their meaning too vaguely, they used 
to add ' homo ' also ; for example. . . . Lucihus in book 
XXIX . . . — 

" What man are you? " " No man am I." <^ 

935 
Fears of the doorkeeper about admitting Lucilius ? : 
Nonius : ' Referre,' to render ... — 
" I hope he'll return me thanks because I have 
sent you in." 

936-7 
Nonius : ' Recipere,' to call away ... — 
" first if there is any dining-room opposite, where 
he could take you in." 

^ Probably Sp. Postumius Albinus, consul in 148 ; who the 
prospective son-in-law was we cannot tell. 

" Aristoph., Wasps, 184 ris ef ttot' wvOpco-n' ireov ; — Ovtls 
vr^ Ma. Horn., Od., IX, 355, 366. 

301 



LUCILIUS 

938 

Varro, L.L., VII, 47 : Apud Lucilium — 
quod thynno capto cobium excludunt foras. 

939-40 
Nonius, 381, 7 : ' Reddere,' facere ... — 
Pluteos excutiet, tectaque et testudines 
reddet. 

941 

Nonius, 245, 13 : ' Anceps ' duplex ... — 
" Nemo hos ancipites ferro effringat cardines.'* 

942 
Nonius, 245, 20 : ' Anceps,' acutum ex utraque parte ... — 
" Vecte atque ancipiti ferro effringam cardines." 

943^ 

Nonius, 288, 27 : ' Deicere ' dicitur mittere ... — 
Vas ex fenestris in caput 
deiciam qui prope ad ostium aspiraverint. 

^^^ exlihro XXIX? quod h quidem F quel Mr. 
quid est L. Spengel cobium CO. ]\Ir. corium cd. 

^^^ excutiet L, Mr. excudet Quich. ex scutis M 
cxcudit lun. excutit cdd. 

^^1 ancipites cdd. ancipiti Bentley 2^roh. H, C.Q., J, 01 

fortasse effringet 

^*3 vas W vasa ]Mr. has cdd., fortasse recte {sc. aulas) 

*3* deiciunt La., G. deiciam rell. tribuitur hoc Jr. 

lib. XXIX XXVII cdd. 

" It is possible that this theme is connected with the 
incidents of the jjreceding frs, ^ 

302 



BOOK XXIX 

938 

(ii) Scene from the ' New Comedy ' ; an excluded lover. '^ 
Varro : In a passage of Lucilius we have — 

because when they've caught a tunny they shut 
the goby outdoors.^ 

939-40 

Preparations for attack : 

Nonius : ' Reddere,' to make ... — 

He will hammer out pent-houses and roofs, he will 
make shield-shelters. 

941 

Nonius : ' Anceps,' double . . . — 

" Let no one break open these double hinges 
with an axe." ^ 

942 

Nonius : ' Anceps,' sharp on either side ... — 

"With crowbar and \\-ith axe of double head ^ 
these hinges I'll break open." 

943-4 

The defence : 

Nonius : ' Deicere ' (throw down) is a term used for to 
send ... — 

I'll throw from the windows a pot do^\'n on the 
heads of any who have strained their way hither 
close by the door. 

* Cichor., 179-180; he interprets: — a whore, when she 
finds a rich man, scorns the poor ones ; cp. Fiske, 151. Cobius, 
gobius, might mean a gudgeon (as some translate), but the 
gudgeon is a fish of fresh waters, the cobius a fish of the sea. 
Cf. PUny, XXXII, 146. 

"^ I retain the reading ancipifes of the 31 SS. — see next note. 

<* I take it that the attacker rephes to the preceding frag- 
ment in elevated style, turliing ancipites into a different sense. 



LUCILIUS 
945 

Nonius, 36, 25 : ' Depilati ' dictum rarcfacti ... — 
" Gnatho, quid actum est?" "Depilati omnes 
sumus." 

946 

Nonius, 272, 12 : ' Caedere,' frangere ... — 
" Caede ostium, Gnatho, urgue." " Restant, 
periimus." 
Cp. Non., 417, 32. 

947 
Nonius, 358, 26 : ' Ofifendere ' est percutere ... — 
** Crus lapide? Nihil est." " Credam, si te 

ofFenderit." 

948 
Nonius, 313, 16 : ' Filum,' oris liniamentum ... — 
<(Tu) surge mulier, due te, filum non malum. 

949 
Nonius, 97, 3 : ' Deletio ' . . . — 
deletionem nostri ad unum exercitus. 

^"^ caedam Gerlach 

^'^ tu suppl. W due te ! Mr., Linds. ducte Gen. 
Bern., 83 dueitc rell. 



" Nonius is vague ; scalded smooth by the hot water thrown 
on them thinks Marx ; surely it simply means ' we're done 
for,' ' cheated.' 



BOOK XXIX 

945 

Set-back of the attackers : 

Nonius : ' Depilati ' (' with the hairs pulled out ') is a term 
used for thinned out ... — 

" Gnatho, what's happened?" "We're all 
fleeced." " 

946 

Nonius : ' Caedere,' to break ... — 

"Smash the door, Gnatho, shove !" ^ "They 
won't shift; we're done for! " 

947 
Nonius : ' Offendere ' means to strike hard ... — 

"Your leg against a stone P*^ It's nothing." 
" I'll believe it, if he strikes you hard ! " 

948 
Nonius: ' Filum,' the feature of the face . . . — 

Up with you, woman ; get a move on ; it's not a 
bad phiz.^ 

949 

(iii) Rome and Hannibal.^ 

Battle of Cannae (216 B.C.) : 
Nonius : ' Deletio ' . . . — 
the destruction of our aiiny to a man. 

^ sc. against the defenders ; or the door-posts ? 

<^ It seems to me that some well known saying is applied 
here; but the fragment is obscure. 

<* Marx takes this as an incomplete septenarius; the read- 
ing is certainly doubtful. We might read ducis filum . . . 
' you spin a good thread,' with a pun on filum, ' face.' 

« The events alluded to date from 2] 6 to 202 b.c. 

305 



LUCILIUS 

950 
Nonius, 317, 29 : ' Habere,' tenere, oceupare ... — 
Hoc turn ille habebat et fere omnem Apuliam. 

951 

Nonius, 288, 33 : ' Deicere,' praecipitare ... — 
detrusus tota vi deiectusque Italia. 

952-3 
Nonius, 240, 9 : ' Accipere,' dccipere ... — 
sic inquam veteratorem ilium vetulum lupuni 
Annibalem acceptum. 

95-1-5 
Nonius, 339, 9 : ' Longe ' etiara ' valde ' . . . — 
cum viderim in vita mea 
i-n-LTevyfxa Apelli longe opera ante alia omnia. 

956 
Nonius, 472, 9 : ' Partiret ' pro partiretur ... — 
Quid? Quas partiret ipse doctrinas bonis . . . 

*^° fortasse Capuam ille 

^^* cum viderim in vita mea Quieh. cuium M cui 

ubi deriminutia (vita) meae Lu. G. cui derim in vita meae 
(mea Harl. 1) rell. 

*^^ eViVeuy/xa lun. epitegma vel epitagma cdd. 

apepelli, apelli cdd. (appelli Gen.) belli M ecpendi Mr. 

®*^ quid . , . bonis Cich. 177 novas coni. M ipse pro 
doctrina boni cdd. 



" Samnium (Marx). Cic-hor., 164 thinks Bruttium. 
* By Scipio's tactics at Zama to make Hannibal's elephants 
useless or (Cichor., 165-7) by the stratagem of Claudius Nero 



306 



BOOK XXIX 
950 

South Italy joins Hannibal after the battle : 
Nonius : ' Habere,' to hold, occupy ... — 
This region ^ and almost the whole of Apulia he 
held at that time. 

951 
Recall GJ Hannibal (203 B.C.) : 
Nonius : ' Deicere,' to hurl headlong ... — 
beaten back by force and hurled out of all Italy. 

952-3 
Battle of Zama (202 B.C.) .? ; 
Nonius: ' Accipere' (take in, receive, entertain), to deceive 

that thus, I say, was that old sly-boots, that old 
wolf Hannibal, taken in.^ 

954-5 
(iv) Works of art. Apelles : 

Nonius : ' Longe ' means even very much ... — 
since I have seen an artifice of Apelles far in 
advance of all other works kno^vn in my hfe.^ 

956 
(v) Other fragments. Socrates^ teaching ? : 
Nonius : ' Partiret ' for ' partiretur ' . . . — 
What then? The teachings which he himself 
imparted to gentlemen . . . 

before the battle of the Metaurus (b.c. 207). But Nonius is 
perhaps wrong and we should take acceptum in an ordinary 
but ironical meaning^' entertained.' 

' In spite of Marx, 1 feel that the manuscript reading forces 
us to refer the fr. not to any bellum {sc. Scipio at Zama) but to 
' Apelles ' and a work of art. 

x2 



LUCILIUS 

957-8 

Nonius, 282, 20 : * Discrimen ' rursum separatio ... — 
et amabat omnes ; nam ut discrimen non facit 
neque signat linea alba, . . . 

Cp. Non., 405, 16. 

959-60 

Nonius, 405, 10 : ' Signare ' est designare, ostendere 

sic Socrates in amore et in adulescentulis 
meliore paulo facie ; signat nil quem amet. 

961 
Nonius, 418, 3 : ' Urgerc ' est premere, cogere ... — 
Urguet gravedo saepius culpa tua. 

^^' ncmut Linds. nam ut cdd. 282 {om. nam Gen. Bern. 
S3) 405 

858 alba <in albo marmore> coni. M coll. Soph., Jr. 301 N 

957-60 coniunx. Mercier 

858 sic Mercier si cdd. socrates e. q. s. cdd. 

Socrates amore quid. ap. lun. amorem Mr. seclud. 
et Mr. 

860 nil quem amet M nilque amat Mr. nihilque 
amaret cdd. signabat niliil quem amaret Leo 



** When drawn on a white surface. Cp. Soph., fr. 307 N 
ov fxaXXov r] XevKU) Xldco XevKT) aTa.9fMT). 



308 



BOOK XXIX 

957-8 
Socrates and friendship : 
Nonius : ' Discrimen ' (distinction) again means separation 

and he used to love all men ; for just as a white 
line " draws no distinction and makes no mark, . . . 

959-60 
Nonius : ' Signare ' (to mark) means to designate, show 

so Socrates in his aiFections, in the matter of the 
young men of rather better looks ; no mark dis- 
tinguishes the object of his affection.^ 



961 

Catching cold : 

Nonius : ' Urgere ' means to press, force ... — 

More often than not it's your own fault that a 
cold in the head troubles you.<^ 

^ Taken from Plato, Charmides, 154 B e'^ol yikv ovv, a» 
€Taip€, ovSeu (jTad^rjrov aTexvoJs yap XevKTj aTadfir) elfil vpos 
Tovs KoXovg. a^eSov yap tl /hoi Trdvres ol iv rfj -qXiKLa KaXol 
(jiai^ovrai. I have kept lines 957-60 in their usual order. 
But it is possible to take them in the order (959-60, 957-8) 
in which Nonius, 405, quotes them, especially if we accept 
Lindsay's reading nemid for nam lit, and put a full stop after 
alba. 

<^ Perhaps gravedo here means the after-effects of drunken- 
ness (Pliny, XX, 136). 

309 



LUCILIUS 

Sal. V. 

962 

Nonius, 43G, 32 : ' Cupiditas ' et ' cupido ' diversa sunt, nam 
* cupiditas ' levior est ... — 

Cupiditas ex homine cupido ex stulto numquam 
tollitur. 

963 
Nonius, 330, 22 : ' Interficere,' occidere ... — 

Prius non toUas quam animum ex homine atque 
hominem ipsum interfeceris. 

964 
Nonius, 172, 5 : ' Satias ' pro satietas ... — 

" Quid mihi proderit quam satias iam omnium rerum 
tenet .^ " 

965 
Nonius, 300, 12 : ' Exui ' . . . — 

unde domum vix redeat vixque hoc exuat se. 

966-7 

Nonius, 311, 23 : ' Fovere,' est nutrire, provehere . . . — 

. . . Ventrem alienum maestum fovere ex mohto 

hordeo, 
uti cataplasma. 
Cp. Non., 350, 35. 

Non. 436, 32 : lib. XXVIII Mr. XVIIII cdd. (*XVIIII 
Par. 7667, m. 1) 

®^- cupiditas | ex homine cupido cupido coni. Linds. 
et stulto Duebner lacvnam post homine statuit M 

'^^ prius non toUas quam Tulli animum cdd. sedud. 
Tulli Riblieck {post interfeceris sequitur in Non. M. Tullius) 
non prius | tollas Mr. non tollas prius | quam sustuleris M 
homine Passerat nomine cdd. 

^^* quern lun. quom coni. Mr. satias iam Flor. 3 
satiast iam vel sim. rell. 

"'' fortnsse ut cataplasmo cataplasmo cdd. 311 cata- 
plasma cdd. 350 

310 



BOOK XXIX 

Sat. V, On cupidity and other imperfections.'^ 
962 
Nonius : ' Cupiditas ' and ' cupido ' are different things ; 
for ' cupiditas ' is the lighter feeling ... — 

Longing can be put out of a [lustful] man, but lust 
is never put out from a fool. ^ 

963 
Xonius : ' Interficere,' to kill ... — 
You could not put out (lust) from the fellow 
before you have put out his intelligence, yes, even 
killed him. 

964 
Xonius : ' Satias ' for ' satietas ' . . . — 
" How ^vill it profit me, a woman who already has 
her fill of all things ? " 

965 
Nonius : ' Exui ' . . . — 

whence he could hardly come home again, and 
hardly divest himself of this. 

966-7 
Nonius : ' Fovere ' means to nourish, promote ... — 
They comforted their raging hunger-sick bellies 
with ground barley and used a poultice.*^ 

" The satire sets forth several Cynic-stoic ideas ; cf . Fiske, 
301 ff. 

* If the Latin is really one complete line, then Nonius has 
probably mistaken cupido for cupido. But there may be 
a lacuna between homine and cupido ; and I translate as though 
it were cupido. 

<= The fragment may be from a context in hexameters. 
With Marx I take uti as a verb, in the historic infinitive; 
cataplasma seems to be used as an ablative like schema in 
line 972. Translate perhaps ' with barley like a poultice.' 



LUCILIUS 

968 

\onius, 186, 28 : ' Vomica,' concava loca vetustate exesa 

Chironeo et non mortifero <adfectus vomicae vulnere. 

969 
Nonius, 527, 23 : ' Vel ' pro etiam est . , . — 

hoc invenisse unum ad morbum ilium, homini vel 
bellissimum. 

970 
Nonius, 291, 17 : ' Exigere ' . . . — 

Cmn cognoris, vitam sine cura exigas. 

971 

Nonius, 248, 8 : ' Bellum,' elegans ... — 

aetatem istuc tibi laturam, et bellum, si hoc bellum 
putas. 

972 
Nonius, 224, 37 : ' Schema ' . . . neutro ... — 
in gymnasio ut schema antiquo spectatores retineas. 

^^8 Chironeo D (I.) tyroneo cdd. prob. M (tironeo 
et <hoc>) vomicae Quich. vomica et cdd. 

^^* invenisse Vahlen invenissct cdd. 

8"" <vilia esse> cum Schmitt 

971 seclud. et Mr. 

^"2 schemate D (F.) antiquum Gulielmus retineas L 

detinet Onions tetinerit Quich. retineres cdd. 



" Marx accepts tyroneo (tironeo) of the mss., and thinks that 
the allusion is to Jason of Pherae, who, incurably sick of an 
ulcer, sought death in battle, but by a sword-thrust his ulcer 

312 



BOOK XXIX 

968 
Nonius : ' Vomica,' hollow spots eaten out by age . . . 
ill with the sore of a Chironian" and no mortal 
ulcer. 

969 
Xonius : ' Vel ' stands for ' even ' . . . — 
to have found this one and only (cure) for that 
disease, the very finest for the man. 

970 
Nonius : ' Exigere ' . . . — 

When you have learnt this, live out your Hfe 
without a care. 

971 
Xonius : ' Bellum,' elegant ... — 
that the passing of time will bring that to you, 
and a fine thing, if you think this is fine.*' 

972 
Nonius : ' Schema ' ... in the neuter ... — 
that you may hold the spectators with a good 
old-time star-turn ^ in the gymnasium. 

was cured. ' Chironian ' ulcer or wound would suit here — 
the so-called ' Chironian ' ulcer (named from the Centaur 
Chiron, who, because he had an incurable sore, gave up his 
immortality) was often incurable, but Jason cured his ; thus 
his was Chironian yet not death-dealing. 

^ Meaning uncertain. 

^ schema (figure, posture) was used as a feminine, or as a 
neuter according to the proper inflexion in Creek; it may be 
that schema is really nominative here (' that you as a special 
turn may hold . . .') and antiquo goes with gymnasio. To 
express Lucilius' meaning here, our phrase ' good old fashion ' 
is not definite enough. 



LUCILIUS 

973 

Nonius, 298, 1 : ' Efferre,' extollere ... — 

omnia alia, in quibus ecferimur rebus, ne ego multis 
loquar. 

EX LIBRO XXVIII AUT XXIX 

974-5 
Priscianus, ap. G.L.^ II, 381, 4 K : Lucilius — 
Quin amplexetur qui velit ; ego non sinam 
me amplectier. 

976-7 
Nonius, 406, 22 : ' Tollere,' occidere. Lucilius lib. XX VI— 
Anxit quern febris una atque una u7r€i//ta, 
vini inquam cyathus unus potuit tollere. 

978 
Auctor, ap. O.L., V, 584, 24 K : Nasum generis ncutri, ut 
Lucilius — 

nasum hoc corpusque scutum. 

979-80 
Probus, ap. G.L., IV, 212, 10 K : ' Nasus hie ' an ' hoc 
nasum ' ? Antiqui neutraliter dicebant. Itaque Lucretius — 

nasum deductius 
quam pandius si paulo vellem. 

*'* velit cdcl. volt Mr. {septennr.) lacun. post sinam 
pon. M 

Non., 406: XXVIII L, Mr. 
*"^ anxit (vel angit) W at cui cdd. 
^'^ scitum Haupt Jortasse acutum 
»8" <si> paulo M 

** Which did not contain senarii such as are the following. 
'' I suggest anxit or angit, but the fragment is doubtful. 
Potuit here means 2)robably ' could have.' 



BOOK XXVIII OR BOOK XXIX 

973 
Nonius : ' EfEerre ' (raise up, puff up), to lift up . . . — 
If I may cut a long story short, all the rest of it — 
I mean the things in which we are puffed up. 

FROM BOOK XXVIII or BOOK XXIX 

974-5 
On women : 

Priscianus : Lucilius writes — 

Rather let him who may wish, embrace her. I 
won't let him embrace me. 

976-7 
Feeble health : 

Nonius : ' Tollere ' (carry off), to kill. Lucilius in book 
XXVI''— 

A man whom one fever, one attack of indigestion 
did choke, — one ladle of wine, I tell you, was enough 
to have carried him off.^ 

978 
A grammarian : ' Nasum ' of the neuter gender, for example 
Lucilius — 

This nose here and this body are a shield. 

979-80 
The following is doubtful : 

Probus : ' Nasus ' masculine or ' nasum ' neuter ? The 
archaic writers used to employ the neuter form. Thus 
Lucretius — 

if I wanted my nose to be a little more hooked '^ 
than crooked. 

•^ or, if we retain didudius, more cleft. And pandius 
may mean wider, flatter. Lucretius (in whom the fragment 
does not occur) is a common mistake for LuciUus. 



LUCILIUS 

EX LIBRIS XXVI-XXIX 
981 

Servius (anctus), ad Ae7i., VI, 1 : \'allum . . . dicebant 
calani ; sicut Lucilius — 

Scinde calam ut caleas. 

id est, ' puer, frange fustes et fac focum.* 

982 

Donatus, ad Ter., Adelph., Ill, 1,8: ' E re nata.' Sic 
proprie dicimus de his quae contra voluntatem nostram 
acciderunt . . . Lucilius — 

Puer hie e re nata sic eius dedit hand malus : 

983-4 

Festus, 372, 7 : ' Redarguisse ' per e litteram Scipio Afri- 
canus Pauli filius dicitur enuntiasse ut idem etiam ' pertisum ' ; 
cuius meminit Lucilius cum ait — 

Quo faeetior videare et scire plus quam ceteri 
' pertisum ' hominem non * pertaesum ' dicere 
t ferum nam f genus. 

Gellius, I, 3, 18 : ' Contra patriam ' inquit Cicero " arma 
pro amico sumenda non sunt." Hoc profecto nemo ignoravit 
et priusquam Theognis, quomodo Lucilius ait, nasceretur. 

88* hominem cd. hominum Mr. humanum genua M 
aerumnamst opus L dices erumnam genus Mr. fortasse 
di>0pcv7Tcov yevos die e re ferum nam genus Stowasser 

Gell. : hoc priusquam nasceretur Theognis omnes noverant 
constit. M 

" That is, warm yourself. This looks like a proverb alluding 
to the soldier's life. 

'' This seems to be the sense of dedit but eius dedit may be 
corrupt. 

^ That is, by claiming to speak very pure and correct Latin. 
Scipio is of course Aemilianus. The end of the second line in 

316 



BOOKS XXVI-XXIX 
FROM BOOKS XXVI-XXIX 

The following must belong to one of the books XXVI, 
XXVII, XXVIII, and XXIX. 

981 
(i) Philosophy and the like : 

Servius (supplemented) : For ' vaUus ' they used the term 
' cala,' like Lucilius' example — 

Split a stake, that you may bake."' 

That is, ' Boy, break some sticks and make up a hearth.' 

982 
Donatus, on ' e re nata ' in Terence : This is a term we use 
properly of events which have happened against our will . . . 
Lucilius — 

As matters were, this slave-boy of his (and a 
good one too) thus spoke : ^ 

983-4 
Festus : Scipio Africanus, son of Paulus, is said to have 
pronounced ' redarguisse ' with a vowel e, just as he even 
used a form ' pertisum ' also ; of this Lucihus makes mention 
in these words — 

V^ereby you may seem smarter ^ and to know 
more than the rest of them, namely that man- 
kind says of a man that he ' was teired of ' not was 
* tired of . . .' 

GreUius : " Against one's country," says Cicero, " one must 
not take up arms even for a friend." To be sure as Lucilius 
says, ' all men knew this even before Theognis was born.' ^ 

Festus is corrupt. Read perhaps hominum . . . humanum genus 
' the human race is teired of men.' Scipio keeping the rule 
pronounced ' redarguisse ' as ' rederguisse,' as it were in a 
'refeined ' manner, changing the vowel after a prefix. 

^ This sentiment is taken from the Greek saying : tovtI 
fiev ijBeLV Trpiv 0eoyvtv yeyove'vai. 



LUCILIUS 

985 

Priscianus, ap. G.L., TT, 379, IG K : Lucilius — 

a me auxiliatus siet 
passive, ^orjOrjOets. 
Cp. id, 5G7, 17. 

986 

Nonius, 195, 4 : ' Cima ' neutro, ut Lucilius — 
asparagi moUes et viride cima. 

987 
Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 338, 2 K. Lucilius ... — 
a)/xoTpi/3es oleum Casinas 
pro ' Casinate.' 

988 

Nonius, 17, 11 : ' Mandones,' edaces . . . Lucilius — 
atque omnes mandonum gulae. 

989 

Probus, ap. G.L., IV, G7, 31 K : Cum dicat Lucilius — 

Austerissimarum herbarmii sucos exprimebat, 

utiquc iam ' hie ' vel ' haec austeris ' . . . facere demon- 
stratur. 

885 siet Quich. sies M auxiliatust Schmidt si est 

cdd. 379 et aid. 5G7 

^^'^ virde Lu. 1 prob. M cima cdd. cyma M 

"^^ exprimebat cdd. exprimat Terzaghi exprimeret 

vafer coni. M 



BOOKS XXVI-XXIX 

985 

(ii) Friendship : 
Priscianus : Lucilius wTites — 
he may be helped by me. 
' auxiliatus ' passively, in Greek ^or)9r]9eis. 

986 
(iii) Eating and drinking : 

Nonius : ' Cima ' in the neuter, for example Lucilius — 

soft asparaguses and green cabbage-sprouts. 

987 
Priscianus : Lucilius . . . in — • 
oil of Casinum pressed from green olives 
used ' Casinas ' (nom. sing, neut.) instead of ' Casinate. 

988 
Nonius : ' Mandones,' gluttons . . . Lucilius — 
and the crunchers' gullets " one and all. 

989 

Probus (on the forms austerus, austeris) : When Lucilius 
says- 
He was squeezing out the juices of the sourest 
herbs ,^ 

then undoubtedly it is shown "^ that he uses the form 
' austeris ' nom. sing. masc. or fem. 

" or, ' all the gluttonies of the crunchers.' 

^ This describes perhaps the preparation of a drug. 

'^ no, it is not. 



LUCILIUS 

990 

Paulus, ex Fest., 381, 13 : ' Remeligines ' et ' remorae ' a 
morando dictae. . . . Lucilius — 

Quaenam vox ex tuo ore resonans meo gradu re- 
moram facit ? 

Cp. Fest., 380, 29. 

991-2 

Servius, ad Aen., I, 181 : ' Anthea si quern ' . . . ' quern ' 
vacat, ut superius diximus istas frequenter vacare particulas 
... in Lucilio — 

" Ecquem Pamphilum 
quaeris? " 

ecquem vacat, nam de uno loquebatur, 

993 

Ausonius, 216 (344) : Lucili vatis — 

subpilo pullo premo. 

994 

Paulus, ex Fest., 449, 4 : ' Sub vitem ' proeliari dicuntur 
milites cum sub vinea militari pugnant. Lucilius — 

neque prodire in altum, proeliari sub vitem procul. 

Cp. Fest., 448, 4. 



^^° quaenam cdd. quoianam ^I ex tuo ore resonans 

Hardie, C.Q., V, 104 extemplo r. L ex tete r. Mr. 

ex tecto Bergk ex aede Ribbeck ex te resonans cdd. 

*^* sul) vitem procul S procul sub vite Paul., 

Fest. 

320 



BOOKS XXVI-XXIX 

990 

(iv) Tragedy and Comedy : 

Paulus : ' Remeligines ' (female delayers, hinderers) and 
' remorae ' (delays) are terms derived from ' morari.' . . . 
Lucilius — 

What sound, pray, is that which, booming out of 
your mouth, makes delay for my steps ? " 

991-2 

Servius on ' Anthea si quem ' in Virgil : " Quern " has no 
real meaning, according to my statement above that particles 
of that kind often have no real meaning ... in Lucilius — 

" Are you looking for any Pamphilus ? " ^ 

' ecquem ' has no real meaning ; '^ for he was speaking of one 
only. 

993 

Ausonius : In the words of Lucihus the poet — 
an under-plucker, a catch-boy, a presser.^ 

994 
(v) Military service : 

Paulus : Soldiers are said to battle ' under the vine when 
they are fighting under a military ' vinea' (penthouse). Luci- 
lius — 

nor to go up on high, to battle at a distance under 
the vine. 

* Probably a mocking allusion to a scene from a tragedy. 

* If the words really came from Lucilius, then the poet 
took them from Terence, Hecyra, 804 hospitem ecquem 
Pamphilum hie habes? (cp. Ter., Andr., 344 Pamphile, te 
ipsum quaero), or from Terence's model. 

*= It is here a way of saying ' Are you by any chance . . .' 
^ From the context where this fr. occurs in Ausonius it 

appears that subpilo, etc. are nouns in the nominative; but 

they may be verbs used in an obscene sense. 

321 



LUCILIUS 

995-6 

Nonius, GG, 27 : ' Praeficae ' dicel)antur apud vctcrcs quae 
aclhihcri solcnt funeri, mercede conductac. . . . Lucilius lib. 
A'A'7/— 

. . . mercede quae conductae flent alieno in 

funere 
praeficae, niulto et capillos scindunt et clamant 

magis. 

997-8 
Nonius, 9-4, 4 : ' Coxendices,' coxas. Lucilius — 

Caput 
collo sustentatur, truncus autem coxendicibus. 



999 

Nonius, 274, 23 : ' Conducere,' utile esse * * * — 

solus vero soli quid re et quaestu conducat suo. 

N071.66: XXVII Mr. 

997-8 caput . . . cocsendicibus H, C.Q., I. 155 collo 
caput I sustentatur truncus sustinetur coxendicibus 0. 
Hermann, praef. ad Plant., Bacch., V prob. M caput ut 
collo sustentatur truncus coxendicibus Mr. caput colos 
tcntatur (tcmptatur G) truncus sustinetur a cocsendicibus 
aid. (collo sustentatur Flor. 2) 

^*9 trib. Lnc. Mr. seio quid re atque Mr. quaestu 
ed. pr. prdb. M quaesti cdd. suo cdd. scio 

Onions 

322 



BOOKS XXVI-XXIX 

995-6 
( vi) Simile of a funeral : 

Nonius : * Praeficae ' is a term which the ancients used 
to apply to women who are wont to be hired on pay to be 
present at a funeral. . . . Lucilius in book XXII — 

keeners, who, hired on pay, weep in another's 
funeral-crowd, tear their hair and cry out much 
more than others do." 



997-8 
(vii) The human body : 
Nonius : ' Coxendices,' hip-bones.^ Lucilius — 

The head is upheld by the neck, but the trunk 
by the hips. 



999 

(viii) Doubtful : 

Nonius : ' Conducere,' to be usefid * * * — 

but he alone (will tell) . . . him alone what is 
to the advantage of his stock and profit.*' 

"^ sc. because they are paid to do it. The fragment probably 
belongs to book XXVII or XXVI. Cf. Marx ; also Fiske, 168, 
463; Cichor., 118-9. 

* Coxendices, hips : coxae, hip-bones. But in Pliny X, 168, 
XXVIII, 179, coxendices are hip-bones; so perhaps here. 

'^ The fragment looks like Lucilian poetry, but attribution 
to Lucilius is guesswork. Perhaps quaesti . . . scio are right 
readings. 

3^5 



LUCILIUS 
LIBER XXX 

Sat. I. 

1000-1 

Nonius, 33, 32 : ' Involare ' est inruere, insilire. . , . 
Lucilius lib. XXX — 

Inde canino ricto oculisque 
involem. 

1002 

Nonius, 478, 13 : ' Nutritur ' et ' nutricatur ' pro nutrit et 
nutricat ... — 

Se nutricatum sane caput opprimit ipse. 



1003 

Nonius, 343, 6 : ' Mitis ' est tranquillus et Icnis ... — 

Est illud quoque mite malum, blandum atque 
dolosum. 

1004 

Nonius, 34, 21 : ' Praestringere ' dictum est non valde 
stringere et clauderc ... — 

[praestringat oculorum aciem] splendore micantl. 

1000 ricto Linds. ritu ed. j)r. ori si ritu Mr. rito 
cdd. 

i"''^ se nutricatum Linds. sensus nutricatum asini ccnii. 
M nutricatus L sensu {svpra u et ivfra ras. Lu.) 
nitricatum Lu., G., Harl., al. sensi nutricatum Par. 7666, 
Lugd., Bamb. sane vel sine cdd. insane Vollmer sei 

nutricatum sibi nunc jMr. 

1003 est D (I.) et cdd. 

100* p. o. a. ex Plauto prius citato videntur esse sumpta 



BOOK XXX 
BOOK XXX « 

Sat. I. Rotnan affair 

1000-1 

Nonius : ' Involare ' means to rush a to leap on. . . . 
Lucilius in book XXX ... — 

Then let me fly at him with a dog's grin and glare. 

1002 

Nonius : ' Nutritur ' and ' nutricatur ' instead of ' nutrit ' 
and ' nutrieat ' . . . — 

Itself indeed doth overwhelm the head 
That nom'ished it's own self.^ 

1003 
Nonius : ' Mitis ' means calm and gentle ... — 
That thing too is gentle, a charming nuisance 
and a treacherous one. 

1004 

Nonius : ' Praestringere ' is a term used for to draw together 
gently and to close ... — 

that it dazzles the eyesight with glittering bright- 
ness. <= 

<» In this book, finished probably before B.C. 123, Lucilius 
established as his permanent metre the hexameter. Marx 
distinguishes five satires, but it seems likely that there were 
six. Terzaghi distinguishes four only. 

^ This may be right, but the meaning is unknown. 

<^ Perhaps imitated from Plautus, Mil. Glor., 4 {praestringat 
oculorum aciem in acie Jiostibus) which Nonius quotes just 
before this passage. But in copying the Lucilius passage a 
scribe seems to have copied part of Plautus instead by mistake. 

325 



LUCILIUS 

1005 
Nonius, 35, 10: ' Anginca,' genus morbi, eo quod angat; 
et Graece avvdyxr] appcllatur ... — 

Insperato abiit ; quern una angina sustulit hora. 

1006 
Nonius, 180, 2 : ' Temnerc,' contcmnerc ... — 
" quodque adeo fuerint qui te temsere superbum." 

1007 
Nonius, 35, 10 : ' Arquatus morbus ' dictus qui regius 
dicitur, quod arcus sit concolor, de virore, vel quod ita stringat 
corpora ut in arcum ducat, quod f — 

Nos esse arquatos ! Surgamus eamus agamus. 

1008 
Nonius, 323, 30 : ' Invadere 'estadpetenterincipere . . . — • 
Ut semel in Caeli pugnas te invadere vidi, 

1009-10 
Nonius, 287, 28 : ' Dicare,' indicare, nuntiare ... — 

sicubi ad aures 
fama tuam pugnam clarans adlata dicasset. 

^^^ te temsere D (I.) qui te temnere Flor. 3 qui 
temnere Lii. 1 qui temnere rell. qui temnere . . . 
superbum {post temnere lac.) M, qui posse addend, 
coni. superbi D (I.) 

iVo^. 35 (1007) : Lucilius lib. XXX suppl. Kettner quod 
natum ex priore quod 

i°°8 caeli pugnas odd. pugnas, Caeli, M 

i"i<' clarans Lips claram mi B praeclaram M 
clarara cdd. alata Lips 

" The name of the author of this quotation has fallen out, 
but it was certainly Lucilius book XXX, because this part of 
Nonius has several quotations all of which come from that 
book. Jaundice docs not distort the body. 

326 



BOOK XXX 

1005 

Nonius : ' Angina,' a certain kind of disease, so called 
because it strangles ; its Greek name too is avvdyxrj ... — 

He passed away against all expectation — he whom 
quinsy carried off in one hour. 

1006 
Nonius : ' Temnere,' to despise ... — 

" and because there were indeed some who 
scorned you as haughty." 

1007 
Nonius : ' Arquatus morbus ' is a term which was used for 
the disease called * royal ' (jaundice) ; it is so-called because a 
rainbow (' arcus ') is of like colour owing to the greenish tint, 
or because it so draws the body that it bends it into a 
bow "... — 

The idea that we are rainbowed ! Let us rise, let 
us go, let us act ! 

1008 
On the question of celebrating in verse the exploits of a 
Roman : ^ 

Nonius : ' Invadere ' (rush at) means to begin eagerly 

When once I saw you make a rush for battles of 
Caelius,*' 

1009-10 

Nonius : ' Dicare,' to point out, to tell news . . . ^ 

wheresoever rumour was brought to my ears and 
told me ^ with praise of your fight. 

* Perhaps C. Sempronius Tuditanus, who in 129 b.c. fared 
ill against the lapydes but was in the end victorious (Livy, 
Epit., LIX). The poet feels unable to ^vrite a worthy epic. 
Cichor., 183 fE. 

^ The allusion is unknown. Marx transposes Caeli and 
pugnas, and makes Caeli a vocative. 

'^ Elsewhere dicare always means to dedicate. 



LUCILIUS 

1011-2 

Nonius, 292, 7 : ' Exanclare 'etiamsignificat perpcti . . . — 

qiiantas quoqiie niodo aerumnas (juantosque labores 
exanclaris. 

1013 
Nonius, 274, 21 : ' Conducere,' convenire ... — 
et virtiite tua, et claris conducere cartis. 

1014 
Nonius, 340, 21 : ' Locare,' constituere ... — 
Haec virtutis tuae cartis monumenta locantur. 



1015 

Nonius, 263, 24 : ' Contentus ' dicitur cui res etiam parva 
abunde est ... — 

et te his versibus interea contentus teneto. 



1016 
Nonius, 344, 21 : ' Meret,' meretur ... — 
Publicitus lege ut mereas praesto est tibi quaestor. 

^"^^ quotque D {1.) fortasse rede 

1013 Q virtute cd. Bern, 83 proh. Onions et virtute tuao 
Mr. fortasfe et virtute tua claris 

^"^* haec virtutis Corpet virtutis haec cdd. chartis 
L prob. M artis cdd. tuai artis coni. Linds. vir- 
tutisque tuae atque artis lun. 

1°^^ et te his Quich. his Gulielnms heis Mr. 

et J his te I\I et is te cdd. 

^"^^ pul)li(itus Mr. publico equo lege C, 214-5 lege 
ut tu L publicu lege bene ]\1 puljlica lege cdd. 

328 



BOOK XXX 

1011-2 

Nonius : ' Exanclare ' (serve out, drain) even means to 
bear steadfastly ... — 

how great were the hardships and labours which 
you have drained to the dregs, and in what manner 
too. 

1013 

Achievements worthy of description : 
Nonius : ' Conducere,' to suit ... — 
that [it is worthy of] your prowess and befits 
illustrious pages." 

1014 
My poetry must satisfy you : 
Nonius : ' Locare,' to establish ... — 
These memorials of your prowess are set out on 
these pages. 

1015 

Nonius : ' Contentus ' is a term applied to a man to whom 
even small possessions are more than plenty ... — 

and meanwhile, content with these verses, keep 
hold on yourself. 

1016 
Affairs of state. 
Military service : 

Nonius : * Meret ' for ' meretur ' . . . — 
That you may serve lawfully at the state's cost,^ 
a treasurer is ready for you. 

" This seems to be the meaning (cf. also Cichor., 185) unless 
e virtute tvu is the right reading. 

^ or 'on the state's business.' Cichor., 214—15 restores: 
' publico equo lege,'' and takes the line to refer to legal cavalry 
service of Scipio. 

329 



LUCILIUS 

1017 
Nonius, 10, 10 : ' Inlex ' et ' exlex ' est qui sine lege vivat 

Accipiunt leges, populus quibus legibus exlex. 

1018 
Nonius, 370, 25 : ' Parcere ' est vcniam daro ... — 
qiianti vos faciant socii quom parcere possint. 

Sat. II. 

1019 

Nonius, 269, 16 : ' Conficere,' consumere, finire ... — 

Conficit ipse comestque. 

Cp. Non., 81, 30. 

1020 

Nonius, 157, 12 : ' Potus ' a bibendo ... — 

serus cum e medio ludo bene potus recessit. 

1021 
Nonius, 81, 34 : ' Cuia ' for ' cuius ' . . . — 
cuia opera Troginus ' calix ' per castra cluebat. 
Cp. Non., 87, 29. 

i^i^ socii cdd. sociis D (l.) fortasse rede compar- 

cere {vel conparcere) cdd. (cum parcere Bern. 83) quom 
parcere M (com- L) 

1020 serus D (I.) secus cdd. c D (I.) eo cdd. 
medio ac ludo cdd. seclud. ac Gerlach a L hac Linds. 
ludo ac quid. ap. Mr. 

1021 Troianus Onions 



BOOK XXX 

1017 

Anti-aliens act of lun. Pennus " (126 B.C.) ? : 
Nonius : ' Inlex ' and ' exlex ' are terms used of a man who 
lives without the law ... — 

They agree to laws by which the people are 
outlaws. 

1018 

Destruction of Fregellae^ (125 B.C.) .? ; 

Nonius : ' Parcere ' (show forbearance) means to grant a 
favour ... — 

<you see,) allies, the value they set upon you. 
since they are able to show forbearance. 

Sat. II. On a dinner-party given '^ in camp by one Troginus. 

1019 
His greed and drunkenness : 

Nonius : ' Conficere,' to consume, make an end of . . . — 
He consumes it and gobbles it up himself. 

1020 
Nonius ' Potus ' drunken from drinking ... — 
when at a late hour he withdrew pretty drunk 
from the midst of the fun. 

1021 
Nonius : ' Cuia ' for ' cuius ' . . . — 
through whose doings Troginus was called ' Pint- 
pot ' throughout the camp. 

« Thus Cichor., 211-12. 

^ Cichor., 208-210. Fregellae had revolted after Pennus' law 
of 126 B.C. Scipio had in the past championed the Italians and 
his friend Lucilius too doubtless had sympathy for them. 

<= in Spain? (At least so the Celtic Troginus suggests.) 
This may be a continuation of Sat. I. My construction is 
quite conjectural, but certainly some sort of carouse in camp 
is indicated. 

331 



LUCILIUS 

1022-3 

Nonius, 321, 17 : ' Invitare ' significat replere ... — 
" Scito etenim bene longincum mortalibus morbum 
in vino esse ubi qui invitavit dapsilius se." 

1024 
Nonius, 347, 32 : ' Micare,' per vices sine ordine moveri 

Omnia turn endo muco videas fervente micare. 

1025 

Nonius, 234, 37 : ' Aptum ' rursum conexum et conligatum 
significat . . . (235, 17)— 

unus consterni nobis vetus restibus aptus. 

1026 

Nonius, 35, 17: ' Privum ' est proprium uniuscuiusque ; 
unde et ' res privata ' . . . — 

Culcitulae accedunt privae centonibus binis. 

1027 

Nonius, 83, 7 : ' Caries ' est vetustas ... — 
Clauda una est pedibus cariosis mensula vino. 

^"22 scito etenim bene Muret scibo ego enim bene M 
cibo vel cito bene enim cdd. 

1025 unus cdd. clinas Mr. consterni L consternit cdd. 
aptus cdd. aptas Mr. 

^"^^ clauda Guietus plancla Onions plauta cdd. recc. 
mensula vino ignot. in exempl. Bodl. nobis M mensa 
Liboni S Libonis Gerlach mensa Sabino Mr. [ed. Non. 
mers Libiteinae ed. Luc.) mens elephanti T mensu libano 
cdd. mensu iabino Flor. 3 

" endo muco ^ in mucho, ev ixvxoj. Probably a reminis- 
cence or parody of a passage in Ennius. 

332 



BOOK XXX 

1022-3 

He excuses a poor dinner : 

Nonius : ' Invitare ' (invite, entertain, regale) means to 
fill ... — 

" For know you well that in wine there lies a 
lingering illness for mortal men, when someone has 
entertained himself too richly." 

1024 

Preparations : 

Nonius : ' Micare,' to be moved to and fro aimlessly. 

Then you could see everything flickering in the 
seething depths [of the house]." 

1025 

The mess-tent : 

Nonius : ' Aptum ' again means fastened and tied together. 

one couch ^ to be spread for us, an old one tied 
with cords. 

1026 

Nonius : ' Privum ' (single, one for each, one's own) means 
the personal property of any single individual; whence is 
derived ' res privata ' . . . — 

There were added little mattresses, our very own,*' 
to two patchwork coverlets for each. 

1027 
Nonius : ' Caries ' means old age ... — 
For the wine there was one rickety little table on 
rotten leg's. 



^ Supply ledus or grabatiis, * camp-bed. 
<^ or ' one for each of us.' 



333 



LUCILIUS 

1028-9 

Nonius, 117, 29 : ' (Jumiac,' gulosi . . . — 
•' Illo quid fiat Lamia et Bitto oxyodontes 
quod veniunt, illae gumiae evetulae improbac in- 
eptae? " 

1030 
Priscianus, ap. G.L., II, 488, 21 K : Lucilius in XXX— 
" quis totum scis lam corpus perolesse bisulcis." 
pro perolevisse. 

1031 
Nonius, 320, 35 : ' Invitare ' apcrtam habet significantiam 

" Contra haec invitasse aut iiistigasse videntur." 

1032-3 
Nonius, 137, 26 : ' Mictilis ' paupercula pulmentaria . . . — 
pulmentaria ut intibus aut aliqua id genus herba 
et ius maenarum, bene habet ; sed mictilis haec est. 

Cp. Non., 209, 4. 

"28 Bitto M Pytho S pitto odd. oxyodontes 

S ixiodontes cdd. 

1029 gumiae illi evetulae Flor. 3 g. illiae vctulae rell. 
g. niiUe e. vet illi g. v. coni. Lands. illae gumiae S gomiae 
Mr. 

^^^^ iam corpus L corpus iam cdd. 

1^32 aliqua et id genus cdd. 209 aliquod genus cdd. 137 
aliquae id Onions 

1033 sed S sei Mr. se cdd. (137) mictilis 6'^ 

137 {in marg.) mictyris cdd. (mictiris G^) prob. M 

<» So this line is usually taken with bisulcis as an ace. pi. 
(cf. C.G.L., V, 271, 39 bisulcis, divisis ungulis porcus.). But 
perhaps we should translate : ' the bodies of which cloven- 

334 



BOOK XXX 

1028-9 

Some ill-famed guests : 

Nonius : ' Gumiae,' gluttons ... — 
" What may come of it that the sharp-toothed 
Lamia and Bitto are turning up there, those 
wretched Uttle gluttonous villainous stupid old 
hags ? ' ' 

1030 

Priscian : Lucilius in book XXX — 

" whose bodies, as you know already stank of 
cloven-footed cattle all over." ° 

writes ' perolesse ' instead of perolevisse. 

1031 
Nonius : ' Invitare ' has an obvious meaning ... — 
" On the contrary all this seems to have invited 
them or spurred them on." ^ 

1032-3 

Poor food : 

Nonius : ' ^Mictilis,' a kind of poor and inferior relishes 

relishes such as succory or some herb of that kind, 
and anchovy-sauce — that's all right; but this is 
piddling stuff. <^ 

footed beasts you know are already fully grown up,' taking 
hisulcis as dat. pi. of bisulcus. However, Priscian has just 
mentioned redoleo, perf. redolui or redolevi, ' to emit a smell.' 

* Or perhaps spurred Troginus on to invite them. 

'■ or ' makes you want to piddle,' Perhaps the sense is : — 
when once the patient is well, this diet is as nasty medicine 
to him. Cf. Marx ad 1076; Cichor., 217-18; Fiske, T.A.P., 
XL, 136. mictilis could hardly be the Greek iLvariXr]. In 
Nonius the fr. is attributed to both XXX and XX ; if the latter 
is right, it belongs to Granius' feast (pp. 141, 186 ff.). 

Z2>S 



LUCILIUS 

1034 
Nonius, 96, 9 : ' Deblaterarc,' obloqui, confingere ... — 
Deblaterant, blennus bonus rusticus concinit una. 

1035-6 

Nonius, 277, 28 : ' Delica ' est aperi et explana ... — 
" Nemo istum ventrcm pertundet." " Delicet, 

ecquae 
intus via, at que videbis." 

1037 
Nonius, 298, 28 : ' Excutere,' excluderc ... — 
" Ipso cum domino calce omnes excutiamus." 

Sat. III. 
1038 

Nonius, 348, 26 : ' Mittere,' omittere . . . — 
Hoc missum facies, illo me utere libente. 



1036-6 ^yj letnm. ' delicere ' iraiec, INIr. {Non., 277, 17-22) 
delicet ecquae H, C.Q., I, 157 delicietque cdd. intus 
via H, C.Q. I, 157 utere vi Gerlach ut veniatque 
Mr. uti Mr. uti {I'el ut) via atque cdd. videbit 
Linds. videbis cdd. " delica." aitque : | ' uti perge via 

atque videbis' M [secuiul. cdd. sub lemm. 'delica') de- 
licet : aude L delicat <ipsa. | Fac veniat> liceatque uti via 
Leo 

1038 lubente lun. ibcntcr cdd. 



336 



BOOK XXX 

1034 

Progress of the meal : 

Nonius : ' Deblaterare,' to talk at, make up talk (?)... 

They babble away, and a dear old blockhead yokel 
chimes in with them." 

1035-6 

Nonius : ' Delica ' (make clear) means lay open and 
explain ... — 

*' No one will poke through yonder belly." " Let 
her make clear if there is any way in, and you'll 
see." ^ 

1037 
Nonius : ' Exeutere,' to shut out ... — 
" Let's kick out the whole crowd, host and all ! " 

Sat. III. On social life in Rome. 

1038 

Take my advice : 

Nonius : ' Mittere,' the same as ' omittere ' . . . — 

The one you will send packing, the other you will 
use with my good will.'^ 

** We might take deblaterare as : strike up or babble a silly 
tune; obloqui : join in singing; confingere : improvise; con- 
cinit : sings in harmony, in tune. 

^ I adopt the reading of Housman, C.Q., I, 156-7 and refer 
the fragment to one of the two guests mentioned in lines 
1028-9. 

'^ He seems to mean : you must have done with the evils I 
describe and profit from my advice about them. 

337 

VOL. III. z 



LUCILIUS 

1039-40 

Nonius, 320, 25 : ' Honor,' praemium ... — 
Cuius vultu ac facie ludo ac sermonibus nostris 
virginis hoc pretium atque hunc reddebamus 
honorem. 

Cj). Konius, 366, 10. 

1041-2 
Nonius, 401, 3 : ' Subigere,' mollire vol exercerc ... — 

" Ante ego te vacuam atque animosam 
Tessalam ut indomitam frcnis subigamque do- 
in emque." 
Cp. Non., 233, 39-40. 

1013-4 
Nonius, 401, 13 : ' Subigere,' cogere ... — 
" Tune iugo iungas me autem et succedere aratro 
invitam et glebas subigas proscindere ferro? " 

1045 
Nonius, 350, 5 : ' Maculosum,' sordidum, immuudum 

Hanc vestimcntis maculosis tu aspice, siste. 

1°*^ ante H, C.Q., I, 155 anne ego te vacuam L froh. M 
an equam te acrem T an ego te equam Linds. an ego 
te acuam odd. 

^"*2 subigam ante domemque cdd. 401 subigantquc 

domentque cdd. 233 subigamque domemque Bentin. 

i"^3 autem coni. H anne ^1 apte Mr. ante cdd. 

1044 invitam Gulielmus invitum cdd. 

^"*^ hanc W nee L ec Mr. haec cdd. tu 

aspice siste W turn aspicere iste Quich. tum aspieietis 
coni. Linds. tum aspicit iste lun. cum aspicies te L 
tu aspice sis te ]Mi-. tum aspice sis te M tum aspice iste 
cdd. 

33^ 



BOOK XXX 

1039-40 
(A) Mainly about women. 
A 'pretty girl : 
Nonius : ' Honor ' (mark of respect), a reward ... — 

To this maiden's pretty face and looks this was the 
price, this the mark of respect we offered — through 
our sport, our discourses." 

1041-2 

A high-spirited girl : 

Nonius : ' Subigere ' (force under, break in), to make tame 
or to exercise ... — 

" You who have been till now unmated and spirited 
like an untamed filly of Thessaly — let me break 
you in and tame you with bit and bridle." 

1043-4 
Nonius : ' Subigere,' to force ... — 

"What! You yoke me to a yoke! And force 
me against my will ^ to be made fast to a plough 
and cleave clods with the share ? " 

1045 

A slattern : 

Nonius : ' Maculosum,' dirty, unclean ... — 

Do stop and look at her in her stained clothes ! 

" Fiske, T.A.P.y XL, 141. Lucilius wanted to do justice 
to her looks in a satire; notice that he apparently calls his 
satires ' ludus ' and, like Horace after him, ' sermones.' 

* I take it we must read invitam with Gulielmus and so make 
the woman answer back in like metaphor. Marx says this 
does not convenire videtur mulierum ingenio. 

339 
z2 



LUCILIUS 

1046 

Nonius, 250, 38 : * Ccdcre ' significat secundum consuctu- 
dincm abirc supcratum ct locum victori dare ... — 

quando(i[ue pudor ex pectore cessit, 



1047 

Nonius, 385, 21 : ' Sublatum ' dicimus remotum ... — 
Sublatus pudor omnis, licentia fenus refertur. 

1048 
Nonius, 493, 22 : ' Inberbi ' pro inberbes ... — 
inberbi androgyni, barbati moechocinaedi. 

1049-51 
Nonius, 493, 26 : ' Sescentum ' pro sescentorum ... — 
Maximus si argenti sescentum ac mille reliquit. 

Idem ... — 
Quid vero est, centum ac ducentum possideas si 
milia ? 

1052 
Nonius, 484, 24 : ' Sumpti ' pro ' sumptus ' . . . — 
quid dare quid sumti facere ac praebere potisset. 

^°*' fenus refcruntur Gen. Bern. 83 fenore fervit Mr. 
^^^^ ac cdd. atque Bouterwek aut coni. Mr. 
^"^2 potesset Linds. 



" or, 'hundreds, even a thousand.' Sescentum, accusative. 
Maximus is Q. Fab. Max. Aemilianus (consul in 145 B.C.), brother 



BOOK XXX 

1046 

Shamelessness of modern times : 

Nonius : ' Cedere ' means, according to habitual usage, to 
move away when one has had the worst of it, and to give 
place to the winner ... — 

and since shame has yielded place and gone from 
their hearts, 

1047 

Nonius : ' Sublatum ' is a term which we use in the sense of 
' remotum ' . . . — 

All sense of shame is erased from the account, 
licence is recorded on the credit side. 

1048 
Nonius : ' Inberbi ' for ' inberbes ' . . . — 
beardless she-males, bearded sodom-adulterers. 

1049-51 
(B) HoiLsehold economy. 

Great men and small estates : 

Nonius : ' Sescentum ' for ' sescentorum ' . . . — 

if Maximus has bequeathed a six hundred and a 
thousand of silver.^ 

The same poet . . . — 

But what does it matter if you possess one or two 
hundred thousand ? 

1052 

Estimating one's resources : 

Nonius : ' Sumpti ' for ' sumptus ' . . . — 

what he would be able to give, and how much he 
could afford to offer and spend. 

of Scipio, unless we read nuiximus. Notice the irregularity in 
duc£ntum, to be avoided perhaps by reading atque for ac. 

341 



LUCILIUS 

1053^ 
Nonius, 118, 6 : ' Gerdius ' . . . — 

curare domi sint 
gerdius ancillae pueri zonarius textor. 

1055-6 

Festus, 122, 1 : ' Mamphula ' appellatur panis Syriaci 
genus . . . cuius meminit Lucilius — 

Pistricem validam, si nummi suppeditabunt, 
addas empleuron mamphulas quae sciat omnes. 

1057 
Nonius, 399, 19 : ' Subducere ' est surripere ... — 
neu qui te ignaro famuli subducere 

1058 

Schol. Vat., ad Verg., G., II, 159 : Lucilius in tricesimo — 

Non numquam dabit ipsa aetas quod possit habendo. 

1059-60 

Nonius, 140, 8 : ' Mansum,' mandendum aut mansatum 

" sperans aetatem eadem me 
haec proferre potesse et mansum ex ore daturum." 

1053 curate Passerat 

^"^* textor lun. tector cdd. 

1055-6 ij-ii^^ lif)^ XXX W 

1057 ignaro Gerlach ignoro cdd. 

1058 prosit L 

1"^^ eadem Par. 7G67 candcin rell. me suppl. Quicli. 
aetatem item eandem M aetatem in eandem Mr. 

^^'^ posset cdd. posset et iVor. 3 jiotcsse et CJulielmua 

342 



BOOK XXX 

1053-4 

Necessities of a household : 

Nonius : ' Gerdius ' . . . — 

to take care that there are at home a linen- 
webster, some handmaidens and slave-boys, a belt- 
maker, and a wool-weaver. 

1055-6 
Festus : ' Mamphula ' is the name given to a kind of bread 
from Syria . . . Lucilius mentions this — 

If you will have enough cash you should get also 
a hefty broadsided bakeress who knows about all 
kinds of Sp'ian burnt cakes. 

1057 
Nonius : ' Subducere ' (filch, steal) means to tear away 
secretly ... — 

and lest any of your house-slaves can do some 
sly filching without your knowing. 

1058 
Trusting to chance : 

A scholiast on a passage in Virgil : Lucilius in the thirtieth 
book — 

Now and again time itself will give what it can 
for keeping. 

1059-60 

Hard times in the household ? : 

Nonius : ' Mansum,' to be chewed, or, bitten up . . . — 

" hoping that I can provide all thesfe very needs 
for a lifetime and will give a chewed piece from the 
mouth."'* 

'^ Fiske T.A.P., XL, 135-6. The readings and the meaning 
are not certain, but the reference seems to be to parent and 
child. 

343 



LUCILIUS 

Sat. IV. 

An argument between Lueilius and at least one other 

literary man, apparently a writer of comedies (see Marx, ad 

1029; Cichor 193 ff. argues for Afranius); there may have 

been other opponents, including Accius. The satire was 

1061 

Nonius, 317, 7 : ' Gestire ' est cupere ... — 

quantum haurire animus Musarum e fontibus gestit. 

Cp. Non. 319, 16. 

1062 

Nonius, 143, 14 : ' Neminis ' positum pro nullius ... — 

Neminis ingenio tantum confidere oportet. 

Cp. Priscian., ap. G.L., II, 207, 5 K. 

1063 
Nonius, 296, 1 : ' Experiri,' temptare ... — 
Summatim tamen experiar rescribere paucis. 

1064 
Nonius, 249, 8 : ' Conmittere,' credere, permittere ... — 
cui sua conunittunt mortal! claustra Camenae. 

1065 
Nonius, 373, 5 : ' Producere,' foras ducere ... — 
Producunt me ad te, tibi me haec ostendere cogunt. 

1066 
Nonius, 278, 33 : ' Da,' die ... — 
si liceat facere et lam hoc versibus reddere quod do. 

i"6i quantum cdd. 319 quanto cdd. 317 
1062 ingenio cdd. Prise. ingenium cdd. Non. 
^°®* quoi Mr. quia cdd. (qui Escorial. 1) 

344 



BOOK XXX 

Sat. IV. 

addressed to some Roman (perhaps Tuditanus — Cichor., 183) 
of poetic taste to whom Lucilius Av^as introducing himself as a 
new friend. Cf. Bolisani, Lucil., pp. 337 ff. 

1061 
Introduction. Lucilius'' ambition or tastes : 
Nonius : ' Gestire ' (to long) means to desire ... — 
as much as my mind longs to drink from the springs 
of the Muses. 

1062 
His reasons for telling his friend about his dispute : 
Nonius : ' Neminis ' put for ' nullius ' . . . — 
One ought to trust no man's talents so much [as 
yours]. 

1063 
Nonius : ' Experiri,' to try ... — 

Still I will try to write a short reply in a few 
words. 

1064 
Nonius : ' Committere,' to entrust, surrender ... — 
me to whom, mortal as I am, the Goddesses of 
Song entrust their bolts and bars.^ 

1065 
Nonius : ' Producere,' to bring into the open ... — 
They bring me out to you, they force me to shew 
you all this. 

1066 
Nonius : ' Da,' tell ... — 

if I may be allowed to do this, and to put now into 
verses * this which I have to give. 

" or, ' closed strongholds,' ^ or, ' deliver in verses.' 

345 



LUCILIUS 

1067 

Nonius, 408, 31 : ' Tangcrc ' etiam circumvcnirc. . . . 
Lucilius Ub. XXX— 

et Musconis manum perscribere posse tagacem. 

Cp. Fest., 359, 13; Paul., 358. 

1068 
Nonius, 240, 1 : ' Accipere,' audire ... — 
Hoc etiam accipe quod dico, nam pertinct ad rem. 

1069 
Nonius, 505, 25 : ' Nolito ' pro ' noli ... — 
Nolito tibi me male dicere posse putare, 

1070 
Nonius, 350, 9 : ' Macula,' turpitudo ... — 
quem scis scire tuas omnes maciilasque notasque. 
Cp. Non., 354, 19. 

1071 
Nonius, 335, 37 : ' Lustrare ' dicinnis ct scortari, a lustris 

quem sumptum facis in lustris circum oppida 
lustrans. 

1067 musconis Non. mustonis Fesf. {npogr. Polii. 
mutonis rdl.) muttonis Cichorius manum FcsL, Paul. 

manu Non. 

^""^ circum aid. forlasse circi 



BOOK XXX 

1067 

Nonius : ' Tangere ' means even to ' get round ' (cheat). 
. . . Lucilius in book XXX has ' tagax ' — 

and to be able to write fully about Muscon ^ and 
his thievish hand. 

1068 
Lucilius addresses his opponerds ? : 
Nonius : ' Accipere ' (take, receive), to hear ... — 
Take also this which I have to say, for it is to the 
point. 

1069 
Nonius : ' Nolito ' for ' noli ' . . . — 
You must not think that I can slander you, 

1070 
Nonius : ' Macula ' (blot, stain), disgrace ... — 
who, as you know, knows all your blots and black 
marks. 

1071 
Harlotry : 

Nonius : ' Lustrare ' is a term which we use also in the sense 
of ' scortari,' go whoring, from ' lustra ' (brothels) ... — 

what expense you incur in leaping-houses, leaping 
round the circas and its barriers.* 

<* This is the reading in Nonius. Cichor., 206-8 points to 
one Q. Mutto. 

* This is probably the meaning. For oppida (barriers) see 
Varro, L.L., V, 153; Hor., S., I, 6, 113 ad circum iussas 
prostare puellas ; cf. also Juv., Ill, 65 ; I take it that Lucilius 
puns on lustrare and lustrari. Perhaps we ought to read 
circi which a scribe misunderstanding oppida as * towns ' 
perhaps altered to circum. But cf. Fiske, Liicilius and Horace^ 
323. Circum a preposition or an adverb ? 

347 



LUCILIUS 

1072-3 
Nonius, 327, 7 : ' Improbum,' saevum ... — 

Improbior multo quam de quo diximus ante ; 
quanto blandior haec, tanto vehcmentius mordet. 

1074 

Nonius, 173, 18 : ' Speciem,' specimen vel exemplar ... — 
sicuti te quern aequae speciem vitae esse putamus. 

1075 
Nonius, 124, 36 : ' Incilare ' est increpare vel inprobare 

Nunc, Gai, quoniam incilans nos laedis vicissim, 



1076 

Festus, 156, 6 : ' Me ' pro ' mihi ' dicebant antiqui, ut. . . , 
Lucilius — 

nunc ad te redeo ut, quae res me impendet, agatur. 



1077 
Nonius, 306, 16 : * Fortis ' etiam dives . . . -- 
Omnes formonsi, fortes tibi, ego inprubus ; csto. 
Cp. Non., 327, 17. 



^°'* sicut L quem aequae D (I.) qui ea quae cdil. 

prob. M esse putamus edd. putamu.s esse cdd. 
iO'« ex lihro XXX ? 

348 



BOOK XXX 

1072-3 
Nonius : ' Improbum,' cruel ... — 
She is much wickeder than he about whom we 
spoke before ; the more she fawns " the harder 
does she bite. 

1074 
Nonius: ' Speciem,' a sample or a pattern . . . — 
just as you, whom we believe to be the very- 
likeness of the righteous life. 

1075 

The foUotcing fragments are probably to be assigned to the 
poefs adversary or adversaries. 

Lucilius'' adversary ? now it is my turn : 

Nonius : ' Incilare ' (cut or lash with words) means to 
blame or to disapprove of . . . — 

Now, Gaius,^ since you in your turn lash us by 
your fault-finding, 

1076 

Festus : The archaic writers used to say ' me ' for ' mihi,' 
for example. . . . Lucihus — 

now I come back to you, so that we may deal with 
the business that hangs over me. 

1077 
Nonius : ' Fortis ' means even rich ... — 
In your view, all are well off in looks, well off in 
purse, but I am a villain. Granted. 

" Marx takes haec as a neuter pi. (sc. dicit); this seems 
unnecessary. Lucilius probably refers to a prostitute. 

* sc. Lucihus. Take possibly vicissim as leading on to the 
next fr. ' in my turn . . .' 

349 



LUCILIUS 

1078 
Nonius, 420, 27 : ' Volutarc,' cogitatione pcrquirerc ... — 
Haec tu me insimulas ? Nonne ante in corde volutas ? 

1079-80 

Nonius, 181, 22 : ' Tenta ' dictum pro ' extensa ' . . . — 
Hie, ut muscipulae teniae atque ut scorpios cauda 
sublata, 

Cp. Non., 264, 13; 385, 34. 

1081 
Nonius, 175, 14 : ' Sucerdae ' . . . — 
Hie in stercore humi stabulique fimo atque 
sucerdis, 

1082 
Nonius, 420, 25 : ' Volutari ' dicitur ' volvi ' . . . — 
Quid tu istuc curas ubi ego oblinar atque voluter ? 

1083 
Nonius, 387, 33 : ' Servare,' soUicite et suspiciosc obscrvare 

Quid servas quo earn quid agam ? Quid id attinet 
adte? 

1084 
Nonius, 388, 27 : * Saevum ' . . . — 
idque tuis factis saevis et tristibus dictis. 
Cp. Non, 409, 10. 



^°^^ tenta eaque scorpios odd. 181 (tenta atque Flor. 3) 
muscipulae tantae atque ut s. cdd. 385 muscipula contenta 
atque {om. ut) cdd. 204 

"*^ stabulique Passerat fabuHsque cdd. 



BOOK XXX 

1078 

Nonius : ' Volutare ' (turn about, turn over), to inquire 
into with care by thinking over ... — 

What, are these the charges you lay against me 
falsely ? Do you not first turn them over and over 
in your heart ? 

1079-80 

Nonius : ' Tenta,' a term used for ' extensa ' . . . — 

This fellow, like set mouse-traps," like a scorpion 
with his tail upraised, 

1081 

Nonius : ' Sucerdae ' . . . — 

This fellow on the ground amidst muck and dirt 
and swine-dung of the sty.^ 

1082 
Nonius : ' Volutari ' is a term used for ' volvi ' . . . — 
You there, what business of yours is that — where 
I bedaub myself and wallow ? 

1083 

Nonius : ' Servare ' (keep close watch), to observe with 
anxiety and suspicion ... — 

Why do you keep close watch whither I go, what I 
do ? What has that to do with you ? 

1084 
Nonius : ' Saevum ' . . . — 

and this . . . with your dire doings and dismal 
sayings. 

<* It is just possible that teniae muscipulae are here sundews 
(fly-catching plants) with leaves open {musci-pula, cp. mani- 
pulus [-pleo, plenus]). 

^ But fdbulis of the odd. may be right : — ' little beans,' 
' pellets ' of goat's dung. 

351 



LUCILIUS 

1085 
Nonius, 284, 13 : ' Diffcrrc,' diffamare, diviilgare . . . -- 
Gaudes cum de mc ista foris sermonibiis differs. 

1086 
Nonius, 284, 17 : ' DitTerrc,' dividere vel scinderc ... — 
et maledicendo in multis sermonibus differs. 

1087 

Nonius, 121, 2 : ' Hilum,' breve quoddam ... — 
quod tua tu laudes culpes non proficis hilum. 

1088-9 

Nonius, 300, 31 : ' Exultare ' est gestu vcl dictu iniuriam 
facere ... — 

Quin totum purges devellas me atque deuras 
exultes [adequites] et sollicites. 

1090 
Nonius, 326, 37 : ' lacct,' sordet, neglectus est ... — 
et sua perciperet retro rellicta iacere, 

1091 
Nonius, 303, 21 : ' Ferre ' . . . — 
et sola ex multis nunc nostra pocmata ferri. 

i»85 fori Mr. 

los" multis rdd. vulgi Mr. 

^"^" quo Mr. tua<tu>Mr. tu nunc M tu aliuiu 
B tu alios Leo tu autem Sehmitt tu si L tu 
nunc laedes C 194 tua lades cdd. laudes edd. 

^"^* adequites Escorial. mg. Gen. 3 mg. ; om. rell. et add. 
Gerlach exultes si sollicites Quieh. exultes [adjequites. 
Exultans {iwv. lemm.), soUicitus Linds, q.v. 



BOOK XXX 

1085 
Nonius : ' Diffcrrc,' to spread a bad report of, to publish 
abroad ... — 

It gives you joy to publish abroad in your dis- 
courses " those bad reports about me. 

1086 
Nonius : ' Differre,' to divide or cleave ... — 
and you split me by libelling me in many a dis- 
course.'' 

1087 
Nonius : ' Hilum,' something slight ... — 
Because you praise this and blame that in what 
you yourself have done, you make not a bit of pro- 
gress. 

1088-9 
Nonius : ' Exultare ' (jump up ; exult) means to do harm 
by physical act or word ... — 

Why, you may clean me out altogether, pluck me 
bare, singe me smooth, exult, and worry me.^ 

1090 
Conclusion : cause of the quarrel — Jealousy : 
Nonius : ' lacet,' lies dusty, is neglected ... — 
and noticed '^ that his own works were left behind 
and lav unused. 

1091 
Nonius : ' Ferre ' . . . — 

and that now our poems alone out of many go the 
round. 

" i.e. satires. * again, probably, satires. 

'^ sc. in your satires. If exultes is not transitive, then 
' jump up, jump around.' 

'^ The subjunctive may be after ut or cum. 

353 

VOL. III. A A 



LUCILIUS 
1092 

Nonius, 175, 16 : ' ISimitu,' simul ... — 
Gratia habetur iitrisque, illisque tibique siniitu. 

Sat. V. 
1093 
Nonius, 273, 28 : ' Colligere,' auferre ... — 

" Ruis hoc et colligis omnia furtim." 
Cp. Non., 380, 9. 

1094 
Nonius, 35, 23 : ' Nugator ' . . . — 
" quam me hoc tempore, nugator, cognoscere non 
vis." 

1095 

Nonius, 35, 29 : ' Discerniculum,' acus quae capillos 
mulierum ante frontem dividit ... — 

euplocamo digitis discerniculumque capillo. 

1096-7 
Nonius, 522, 17 : ' Apud,' ad . . , — 
aut cum iter est aliquo et causam conmenta viai 
aut apud aurificem, ad matrem, cognatam, ad amicam, 

^"^2 tibique lun. sibique cdd. 
^^^* quam cdd. quom M quo vel qui Mr. 
1095 fortas.se euplocamu (= cv-nXoKafiov) vel en ttXokiov 
1096-7 causam e. q. s. Lips con(m)mentavi aut (ut 

Escorial. 1, Par. 7667) apud cdd. 

354 



BOOK XXX 

1092 
Lucilius thanks his friend : 

Nonius : ' Simitu,' the same as ' simul ' . . . — 
Thanks to both, to them " and to you also. 

Sat. V. A lonely ivife and her temptations. 
1093 
Nonius : ' Colligere ' (gather, scoop up), to filch ... — 
" You rush hither and scoop up the whole lot on 
the sly." 

1094 
Nonius : ' Nugator ' . . . — 

" which you don't want me to recognise just now, 
you driveller." ^ 

1095 
Wife's excuses to go out : 

Nonius : ' Discemiculum,' a pin which parts women's hair 
in front of the forehead ... — 

for the fingers of the woman Mith lovely tresses,*^ 
and a parting-pin for her hair. 

1096-7 

Nonius : ' Apud,' to . . . — 

or when she has thought over a journey somewhere 
and an excuse for the outing, say for a visit to the 
goldsmith's, to her mother, a kinswoman, or a 
woman-friend, 

" Probably the friends mentioned in fr. 1065. 

^ quam seems to be right (Housman, C.Q., I, 57). Cp. 
also Siiss, H., LXII, 344. 

<= Nonius gives a complete Une but not a complete sense. 
Euplocamo is probably dative; but doubtless it would be 
too harsh to take it with capillo (' for a head of hair with 
lovely tresses '). I suggest euplocamu (euTrAo/ca/xou), genitive. 

355 

AA 2 



LUCILIUS 

1098 

■ Nonius, 523, 8 : ' Opcraii ' est deos religiose et cum summa 
veneratione sacrificiis litare vel convivaii ... — 

aut operatum aliquo in celebri cum aequalibus fano. 



1099 
Nonius, 287, 24 : ' Dicare,' tradere .... — 
iuratam se uni cui sit data deque dicata . . . 

1100 
Nonius, 408, 6 : ' Trepidare,' metuere ... — 

" Sed quid ego haec animo trepidant el dicta pro- 
fundo? " 

1101 
Nonius, 350, IC : ' Metiri ' est transmcare ... — 
Vir mare metitur magnum et se fluctibus tradit. 

1102-3 

Nonius, 297, 29 : ' Ecferre,' erigere, levare ... — 

Continue, simul ac paulo vehementius aura 
inflarit, fluctus erexerit extuleritque, 

^"'^ operatum L operata Gulielmus furtasse rede 
operat aliquo cdd. 

1099 deque Carrio adaequae cdd, 

11"° trepidante cdd. trepidanti Harl. 2 

<» deque dicata is a tmesis of dedicalaqiie. 
\ * That this and other fragments give us Ulysses as a 
Cynic-Stoic hero (see Fiske, 154) I cannot believe; the frs. 
remind one of the temptation of a wife during her husband's 



BOOK XXX 

1098 

Nonius : ' Operari ' means to bring good offering to or to 
feast the gods with awe and with the deepest veneration ... — 

or in order to serve the gods in sacrifices with her 
equals in some oft crowded sanctuary. 

1099 

The husband goes away. Farewells : 

Nonius : ' Dicare ' (dedicate, set apart, bespeak), to hand 
over ... — 

she swore that to the one and only man to whom 
she was given and bespoken . . ." 

1100 
Fears : 

Nonius : ' Trepidare,' to be afraid ... — • 
" But why do I pour forth such words as these 
with a fearful mind ? ' ' 

1101 

The husband journeys by sea : 

Nonius : ' Metiri ' (measure, travel across) means to pass 
across ... — 

Her husband travels over the mighty main and 
entrusts himself to the billows.^ 

1102-3 
Behaviour of the wife ; her anxieties ? : 
Nonius : ' Ecferre,' to raise up, to lift up . . . — 
At once, so soon as the breeze blows up a little 
stronger, and lifts aloft and brings high the billows, 

absence as given in Herondas, I ; or perhaps Lucilius adapts 
the story of Diomedes' faithless wife Aegialea (seB after fr. 
1109-lOK 

357 



LUGILIUS 

1104 
Nonius, 272, 17 : ' Caedere,' conmiscere ... — 
Lana, opus omne perit ; pallor tiniae omnia caedunt. 
Cp. Non., 462, 25. 

1105 
Nonius, 283, 16 : ' Ducere,' existimare, iudicare ... — 
Non datur ; admittit nemo ; nee vivere ducunt. 

1106 
Nonius, 278, 4 : ' Delenitus,' delectatus ... — 
Praeservit, labra delingit, delenit amore. 

1107 
Nonius, 350, 22 : ' Manicae,' quibus manus vinciuntur 

Sic laqueis manieis pedicis mens inretita est. 

1108 
Nonius, 330, 3 : ' Inmittere,' demittere ad prolixitatem 

" neqiie barbam inmiseris istam." 

1109-10 
Nonius, 274, 9 : * Curatum,' cum dilectu apparatum ... — 
et circumvolitant ficedulae . . . turdi 
curati cocti. 

ii<»« delingit T dolicit et Quich. delicit ctW. 
1100-10 vide p. 360. 



BOOK XXX 

1104 

She neglects her tasks : 

Nonius : ' Caedere ' (cut, cut up), to make confusion of 

Her wool, all her work goes to ruin; mustiness 
and clothes-moths make rags of everything. 

1105 
The house is shut up : 

Nonius : ' Ducere,' to believe, to judge ... — 
No admittance ; no one lets them in ; and they 
do not take her to be alive. 

1106 

Return of the husband. Greetings of the wife : 

Nonius : ' Delenitus ' (softened down, soothed), delighted 

She plays the slave to him, she licks his lips, she 
soothes him with love. 

1107 

Nonius : ' Manicae,' bonds with which the hands (manus) 
are fastened ... — 

Thus was his mind tangled in snares, handcuffs, 
foot-shackles (of love). 

1108 
Nonius : ' Inmittere,' to let down to a great length ... — 
" and do not let that beard ffrow lono-." « 

1109-10 
Home-coming feast : 

Nonius : ' Curatum,' furnished with choiceness ... — 
and there went fluttering round (on dishes) fig- 
peckers and thrushes, dressed and done to a turn. 

" of a Stoic philosopher thinks Fiske, 157. 

359 



LUCILIUS 

Servius auctus, ad Ae7i., VIII, 9 : Diomedes postquam 
repperit ira Veneris a se vulneratae revcilens de Troia uxorem 
apud Argos cum Cyllarabo ut Lucilius vel Cometa ut plerique 
tradunt turpiter vivcre noluit reverti ad patriam. 



Sat. VI. ? 
1111-2 
Nonius, 341, 4 : ' Lassum ' dicitur fatigatum . . — 

leonem 
aegrotum et lassum 

1113-4 
Xonius, 125, 27 : ' Inluvies,' sordes ... — 
inluvies scabies oculos huic deque petigo 
conscendere. 

Cp. Non., 160, 19. 

1115 
Nonius, 160, 21 : ' Porrigo,' morbi genus ... — 
tristem et corruptum scabie et porriginis plenum. 

1116-7 
Nonius, 289, 14 : ' Deductuni,' deminutum, suppressum 

Deducta tunc voce leo " cur tu ipsa venire 
non vis hue? " 

1109-10 ficetulae turdi cdd. ficcdulae et undique Munro 

ficedula turdi L ])roh. ]M ficellae Mr. curati cocti 

Stowasser, 11'. St., V, 256 curati os cocti M curatis 

coci cdd. fortasse recte {prob. Linds. .ser/ in septemir. curati 
cools Mr. qui ut sepienar. trib. lib. XXIX) 

1113 Jcque petigo Fruter. dcnique spei cdd. 125 
deinque ro???. lun. denique petigo cdd. 160 

"i« tritum Mr. 



360 



BOOK XXX 

The following perhaps comes here as a contrast or an 
illustration : 

Servius (supplemented) : When Diomedes, on returning 
home from Troy found that, because Venus was angry at 
being wounded by him, his wife was living a life of shame at 
Argos with Cyllarabus, according to Lucilius, or with Cometes 
according to the traditions told by most writers, he no longer 
wished to return to his fatherland." 

Sai. VI.? 
1111-2 

Fable of the fox and the sick lion : ^ 

Xonius : ' Lassum ' is a term used for tired ... — 

a sick and weary lion 

1113-4 
Xonius : ' Inluvies,' filth ... — 

. . . filth and mange and leprosy ^ spread up to 
his eyes. 

1115 
Nonius : ' Porrigo,' a certain kind of disease ... — 
moping, decayed with the mange, and full of scurf. 

1116-7 
Xonius : ' Deductum ' (lowered), made small, kept down 

Then the lion with lowered voice: " W^hy don't 
you want to come hither by yourself? " 

•* No other writer states that Cylarabes (or Cyllarabus) was 
one of Aegialea's lovers. 

* A Cynic-stoic topic, which Lucilius must have given at 
some length. 

'' Fruterius' correction deque petigo is a tmesis of depetigoque. 

361 



LUCILIUS 
1118 

Nonius, 143, 31 : ' Noenura ' pro ' non ' . . . — 

" Sed tamen hoc dicas quid sit, si noenu molestum 
est." 

1119-20 
Nonius, 303, 16 : ' Ferre,' dirigere, ducere ... — 

" Quid sibi vult, quare fit ut introvorsus et ad te 
spectent atque ferant vestigia se omnia prosus ? " 

Cp. Non., 402, 7 ; Porphyr., ad Hor., Epist., I, 1, 74. 



1121 

Nonius, 275, 1 : ' Concelebrare,' diffamare, dictum a cele- 
britate ... — 

Multis indu locis sermonibus concelebrarunt 



1122 

Nonius, 382, 24 : ' Rumpcre,' defetigare ... — 
quae quondam populo risu res pectora rumpit. 

1123 

Nonius, 462, 26 : ' Bonus ' et fortis ct pius dici potest . . . — 
Calvus Palantino quidam vir non bonus bello, 

1118 qui J sit, Santen. quid rest L quid esti Lit. 1 
quid est si Flor. 3, G. noenu lun. nocnum cdd. prob. 
Stowasser 

1119 et ad te lun. ut ad te cdd. 303 aetata cdd. 402 
"-2 populo risu res Madvig populis ora aures oUm Mr. 

populi oris aures {vel auris) cdd. 

1123 Palantino Mercier Palantina Fruter. (-lat-) pal- 
lantino cdd. non bonus Quietus nobilis bonus cdd. 



362 



BOOK XXX 

1118 
Nonius : ' Noenum ' for ' non ' . . . — 
** Still, tell nie what this is if it is no trouble." 

1119-20 

Nonius : ' Ferre,' to guide, lead ... — 

** WTiat does it mean, why does it happen that the 
tracks look inwards and betake themselves all 
straight on up to you? " 

1121 
A popular joke : 

Nonius : ' Concelebrare,' to spread report of, a term 
derived from ' celebritas ' . . . — 

In many places they spread abroad in conver- 
sation " 

1122 

Nonius : ' Rumpere ' (burst), to tire out ... — 

an affair which sometimes makes the folk split 
their sides with laughter. 

1123 
Incidents in Spain : 

Nonius : ' Bonus ' is a term which can be used also of a 
brave and loyal man ... — 

In the Palantine war,^ some baldpate or other, no 
good warrior he, 

" This looks like the beginning of a satire. 
^ Carried on by M. Aemilius Lepidus, 137 B.C. Ciehor., 
36, 215. Calvus is perhaps a proper name. 



LUCILIUS 

1124 

Nonius, 285, 5 : ' Durus,' noccns ... — 
et saevo ac duro in bello multo optimus liostis. 
Cp. Non., 388, 19. 

1125-6 
Nonius, 413, 7 : ' Taetrum ' dicitur inluviosum, faetidum 

quae non spectandi studio sed ab ominis taetri 
inpulsu ingressus, 

1127-8 
Nonius, 330, 15 : ' Induci ' est aliquibus fallaciis decipi 

Quid quaerimus ? Acri 
inductum cantu stolidum . . . 

1129-30 
Nonius, 371, 23 : ' Praestat,' utile est . . . — 

uti pecudem te asinumque ut denique nasci 
praestiterit. 

^^25 spectans spectandi cdd. sechid. spectans Gulielmus 
studio sed ab ominis L studiosa abdominis B studio 
sed abdominis Stowasser studio sed numinis M studiose 
sed hominibus vel sim. cdd. 

1126 ingressast Mr. 

"-' acre cdd. Argon Mr, 

^^-^ cantu stolidum Roth cantustotidum vel cantu 
custoditum cdd. cantustoditum Ial. 1 fortasse cantu 

consopituni 

^^^^ te Tun. tu cdd. turn B denique Aid. den- 
tique cdd. 

364 



BOOK XXX 

1124 

Viriathus ? : 

Nonius : ' Durus,' doing harm ... — 

by far the noblest enemy in a cruel and hard war. 

1125-6 

Other fragments : 

Nonius : ' Taeter ' is a term used for dirty, smelly ... — 

which places he having entered not through eager- 
ness to see the sights but by the impulse of a foul 
omen, 

1127-8 

Nonius : ' Induei ' means to be deceived by some trickery 
or other ... — 

Why worry further ? A blockhead beguiled by a 
shrill song ..." 

1129-30 

Nonius : ' Praestat ' (is better, surpasses), is useful ... — 

that it were better for you to be born a cattle- 
beast or even an ass.* 

" Very obscure. There is perhaps an allusion to some 
catchy or taking tune or to the Sirens' song, with an application 
to backsliding from true philosophic behefs. 

* This is from Menander, Theophorumena, pp. 358-9 L.C.L., 
where a man, given a choice of living creatures as one of 
which he may be reincarnated after death, says he would 
choose any creature, even an ass, rather than a human being. 



LUGILIUS 

EX LIBRIS INCERTIS 
1131 

Festus, 496, 10: cum Paul., 497, 7: <'Schedi>a genus 
navigii <inconditum> . . . <Lucili>us quoque poemata 
* * * is pcrfectis qui essent * * * * cum dixit — 

qui schedium fa<(cio.)> 

Cp. Apuleius, de deo Socr. init. (ut ait Lucilius, schedio . . . 
incondito). 

Cp. Petron., 4. 

Horatius, S., II, 1, 69-71 : 

Atqui 
primores populi arripuit populumque tributim, 
scilicet uni aequus virtuti atque eius amicis. 

Persius, I, 114-5 : Secuit Lucilius urbem 
te Lupe, te Muci, et genuinum fregit in illis. 

Schol., ad Pers., I, 114 : 'Urbem' . . . adeo dixit ' secuit ' 
quia tribus omnes XXXV laceravit ex quibus urbs tota 
constat. 

1132 

Schol. Bob., ad Cic, pro PlaiK., 254, 15 : Tusculani plurimum 
livoris naturaliter etiam circa municipes suos habuisse viden- 
tur; sic et M. Cato ille Censorius pro maligno et invido 
habitus est; nee aliter etiam Lucilius de eorundem moribus 
sentit hoc dicens — 

Prima Papiria Tusculidariim 

1131 fa<ciam tantum non carmina vera> coni. M alii 
cdia, fortasse tribuend. lib. XXX vel XXVI 

1132 Tuscuhdarum Mai Tuscol- Wunder tu stolidarum 
L tu solidarum cdd. 



" Here we have another term used by Lucilius to describe 
his satires. Cf. Ingersoll, C.P., VII, 59 fif.; Fiske, T.A.P., 
XL, 123. From the remains of the passage in Festus, it 

366 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1131 

Luciliiis on his satire : 

Festus with Paulus : ' Schedia ' is a kind of rough-made 
boat. . . . Lucilius also . , . his poems . . . when he said : 

I who make ramshackle poetry." 

Politics, (a) From a satire attacking the Roman tribes : 

Horace : ' But yet Lucilius picked out the faults of the 
people tribe by tribe and of their leaders, kind to be sure to 
virtue alone and to her friends.* 

Persius : Lucilius lashed the city — yes, you," Lupus, and 
you. Mucins — and broke his jaw upon them. 

A scholiast on this passage : Persius spoke of lashing the 
city simply because Lucilius tore with satire all the thirty-five 
tribes out of which the whole city is composed.** 

1132 

A scholiast on Cicero : The Tusculans seem to have shewn 
by nature much spite even towards their fellow towTismen. 
Thus, even the great Marcus Cato the Censor was held to 
be a man of ill will and envy. Nor again does Lucilius feel 
otherwise about their manners by saying — 

First the tribe Papiria of the Tusculids ^ 

appears Lucilius contrasted his rough satires with more 
polished work. 

* Was Horace thinking particularly of the extant passage 
on virtue addressed to Albinus (lines 1196-1208) ? 

" Lupus in book I, Q. Mucins Scaevola in books II and V. 
^ Cf. Bohsani, Lucil, pp. 386 ff. 

* Cichor., 337 has a theory : if Lucilius had followed the 
official order, then the tribe Romulia would have come first. 
He probably satirised a definite meeting of the comitia 
tributa voting in tribes by lot ; in this case Papiria voted first 
as principium. Tusculidaram is used, for metre's sake, 
instead of Tusculanorum. 



LUCILIUS 



1133 



Fcstus, 226, 2 : Oufentinac tiibus initio causa fuit nomen 
llumini.s Oufens quod est in agro Privcrnate mare inter et 
Tarracinam. Lucilius — 

Priverno Oufentina venit fluvioque Oufente. 



1134 

Festus, 258, 27 : Pcdarium senatorem significat Lucilius 
quom ait — 

Gai pes vocem mittere coepit. 
Cic, de Or., I, 72 : C. Lucilius . . . homo tibi subiratus. 

1135 

Cic, de Or., II, 253 : ' Ambigua ' sunt in primis acuta, atque 
in verbo posita, non in re . . . ut iUud Af ricani quod est apud 
Lucilium — 

" Quid Decius ? Nuculam an confixum vis facere ? " 
inquit. 

1136-7 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 3, 21 : Hie fertur domo sua, quam 
ad forum spectantem habuerat, divendita unam columnam 

^^^* Gai pes L agi pes M acipes (acupcs, aquipcs) 
Mueller (0.) agipes<ut> Mr. agipes ctZ. 

" pedarii senatores were those senators who, not having held 
curule office, could seldom do more than concur with any 
vote by ' walking over.' The reading of this fragment is not 
certain ; it may be that Lucilius recorded the voting of the 
individual Romans in a meeting of the senate. 

* 6c. Aemilianus. 

' The point of the jest is unknowm. Praeneste was ap- 
parently famous for nuts and Praenestines were nicknamed 
368 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 
1133 

Festus : The tribe Ufentina -was originally so-called because 
of the river named Ufens which is in the domain of Privemum 
between the sea and Tarracina. Lucilius — 

From Privernum and the river Ufens comes the 
Ufentine tribe. 

1134 

(b) Various citizens mentioned by name. 
Festus : When Lucilius says — 
Gains' foot began to give voice, 
he means a ' foot-vote ' senator." 
Q. Mucins Scaevola : 

Cicero : Gains Lucilius, a man rather annoyed with you 
(Scaevola). 

1135 
P. Decius, tribune m 120 b.c. .^ ; 

Cicero : Ambiguous expressions have peculiar point, and 
are expressed in the word, not in the subject . . . like that 
famous mot of Africanus ^ which is to be found in Lucilius — 

" What does Decius? " says he. " Do you want 
rather to make him a Littlenut on a skewer? " 

1136-7 

Maenius : 

Porphyrio : This man (Maenius), it is said, when his house, 
which he had possessed overlooking the forum, was sold '^ 
piecemeal, excepted one pillar from the sale for himself, from 

' little nuts ' or ' nutlings ' ; and in Cicero's Philippics we 
find an obscure person surnamed Xucula. Perhaps Decius 
had a quarrel with a Praenestine of small stature. Cf. Marx, 
ad 1280; Cichor., 311-2; Fiske, 102-3. 

<^ In 184 B.C. — [Ascon.], ad Cic, Div. in Caecil, 16, 50. 
Maenius' pillar was originally set up in honour of C. Maenius, 
consul in 338 B.C. His family had the right of watching 
games from it. 

369 
VOL. III. B B 



LUCILIUS 

inde sibi cxccpissc undc gladiatores spectarct; quae ex eo 
*Maeni columna' nominabatur. Cuius et Lucilius sic mem- 
init — 

Maenius coliininam 

cum peteret. 



1138-41 

Cic. de Nat. Deor., I, 23, 63 : Quid de sacrilegis, quid de 
impiis periurisque dicemus ? — 

Tubulus si Lucius umquam 
si Lupus aut Carbo aut Neptuni filius - yj 

ufc ait Lucilius — 

putasset 
esse deos, tain periurus, 

aut — 

tarn impurus fuisset ? 

Quintil., I, 5, 56 : Tacco de Tuscis et Sabinis et Praencs- 
tinis quoque ; . . . eorum sermone utentem Vettium Lucilius 
insectatur. 



1142-3 

Scholiasta ad Pers., I, 27 (Usque adeone scire tuum nihil est 
nisi te scire hoc sciat alter) : Haec periodos apud Lucilium 
posita est — 



1136-7 columnam Maeniu' cum peteret D (I.) Maenius 
sed. M 

1140-1 filius putasset I esse deos tarn peierus aut Sto., W. St. 
XX VII, 221 trib. Ub. / D (I.) 



*» sc. L. Tubulus (praetor in 142 B.C. ; received bribes as 
a judge), L. Cornelius Lentulus Lupus (consul in 146, censor 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

which he could look at the gladiator-shows ; it was from this 
fact named 'Maenius' Pillar.' Moreover Lucilius mentions 
it thus — 

When Maenius was making for his pillar. 

1138-41 

Tuhulus and others : 

Cicero : What shall we say about the sacrilegious, what 
about the impious and the oath-breakers ? — 

If ever Lucius Tubulus, if Lupus or Carbo — or 
Neptune's son,'* 

as Lucilius says — 

had thought that there are gods, would he have 
been such an oath-breaker, 

or — 

a man so foul ? 

Vettius Philocomus ? : ** 

Quintilian : I say nothing of Tuscan and Sabine words, 
nor of Praenestine ; . . . Lucihus attacks Vettius as one who 
used words of those dialects. 

1142-3 

One Decimus Sura ? : 

A scholiast on a passage in Persius : This period is to be 
found in Lucilius — 



in 127; see pp. 4flE.), C. Papirius Carbo (alleged murderer 
of Scipio; or Marcus an extortioner — Cic, ad Fam., IX, 21, 
3), and the Cyclops who scorned the gods (Homer, Od., IX, 
273 ff.). Whether the words putasset e. q. s. are likewise from 
Lucilius is not certain. 

^ A friend of Lucilius — Suet., de Gramm., 2. Cp. Introd., 
xvii. But Vettius was a common name among the Marsi 
and Vestini. Cichor. suggests Vettius who was a friend of 
C. Gracchus (Plut., C. Gr., 1). 

371 
BB 2 



LUCILIUS 

Sit me scire volo Decinius mihi conscius Sura 
ne damnum faciam. 

Scire hoc se nescit nisi alios id scire scierit. 

1144 

Festus, 574, 16 : ' Vindiciae ' appellantur res eae de quibus 
controversia est. . . . Lucilius — 

Nemo hie vindicias neque sacramenta veretur. 

1145-51 
Lactant., Div. Inslit., V, 9, 20 : Lucilius tenebrosam istam 
vitaiu circumscripte brcviterque depinxit his versibus — 

Nunc vero a mani ad noctem festo atque profesto 
totus item pariterque die populusque patresque 
iactare indu foro se omnes, decedere nusquam ; 
uni se atque eidem studio omnes dedere et arti — 
verba dare ut caute possint, pugnare dolose, 
blanditia certare, bonum simulare virum se, 
insidias facere ut si hostes sint omnibus omnes. 

1152 
Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 71, 27 K : Forum ' neutro genere 
dicimus locum rebus agendis destinatimi. Lucilius — 

cum illi fora f Irani t 

11*2 git me H, C.Q., I, 158-9 VI me B moechum Mr. 
ut me cdd. (ut raecum Monac.) Decimus mihi H I.e. dum 

raimi M dicemus Mr. dici mihi Buecheler mimi 

vel dicimus mimi cdd. Sura H si sum Buecheler 
summum M sum mi; at Mr. sum cdd. scire hoc 

se nescit fortasse Lucilio fribaenda (M) 

11** sacramenta Huschke sacra omenve Mr. sacra* 
{sign. Mat. ?) veretur Polit. sacra etiam Par. sched. 

a. et Val. Lat. 1549, 27, 31 sacra ... en vel sacra 
neque numen veretur rell. sacra veretur M irih. lib. I B 

1152 niirant L tunc illi fora erant D (I.) transierant 
coni. M cum illic Mr. cum illi fora irant Neapolit. 
erat cd. Colon. Dousae 

372 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

I want Decimus Sura to know with me that I 
know, lest I be a loser.<^ 

He does not know that he knows this unless he knows that 
others know it. 

1144 

(c) Degeneration of political life : 

Festus : ' Vindiciae ' is a name given to those things about 
which there is a controversy. . . . Lucihus — 

No one here has respect for legal claims or for 
sums deposited.^ 

1145-51 
Bustle of the fora ; 

Lactantius : Lucilius portrayed that dark way of life 
summarily and shortly in the following lines — 

But, as it is, from morning till night, on holiday 
and workday, the whole commons and the senators 
too, all alike go bustling about in the Forum and 
nowhere leave it ; all give themselves over to one and 
the same interest and artifices — those of being able to 
swindle with impunity,*^ to fight cunningly, to strive, 
using soft words as weapons,^^ to act the ' fine fellow,' 
to lie in wait, as though all men were enemies of all 
men. 

1152 

Charisius : ' Forum ' in the neuter gender is a term we 
use for a place destined for conducting business. Lucilius — 

when they . . . the fora. 

** In the absence of any better reading and interpretation 
I have followed Housman, C.Q., I, 158. 

* i.e. with the tresviri capilales by the parties in a suit; 
the loser forfeited his deposit. On this and vindiciae, see below. 
Laws of the Twelve Tables, pp. 432, 438, 508-9. 

« * within the letter of the law.' ' if it's safe.' 

•^ or, ' to vie with each other in flattery.' 

373 



LUCILIUS 

1153 

Charis., ap. G.L., I, 217, 25 K : ' Satis ' diverse accipitur; 
avrl Tov ' par ' Lucilius Saturarum ♦ * * — 

cui si coniuret populus vix totus satis sit. 

1154 

Schol., ad luv., X, 66 (Due in Capitolia magnum creta- 
tumque bovem . . .) : Candidum, ut Lucilius — 

cretatumque bovem due ad Capitolia magna. 

1155-6 

Porphyrio ad Hor., S. I, 6, 117 : ' Echinum ' Lueilius sic 
dixit quasi scortea ampulla sit ut cum ait — 

echinus 
cinnabari infectus. 



1157 

Paulus, ex Fest., 500, 24 : ' Sicyonia,' genus calciamenti. 
Lucilius — 

et pedibus laeva Sicyonia demit honesta. 

1153 jortasse saturarum XI (vel XII vel XVI) trih. lib. I 

D(F.) 

1^54 due Mr. duci Pithoeus dueit cdd. Jortasse 

magnum 

1156 cinnabari S ehinnaba Jl/ow. chimabam P in- 
fectus S infectas cdd. Jortasse scrips. Luc. e'xtVous vel 
echinus cinnabari infectos 



" This is after Charisius' own explanation; the man is so 
powerful that not all the people acting together could be 
equal to resisting him : there is an allusion probably to the 
political clubs which were important in the first century at 

374 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1153 

Charisius : ' Satis ' is taken in different ways. Lucilius 
has it in place of ' par ' in ... of the Satires * * *— 

for whom, should he go plotting, the whole people 
would hardly be a match," 

1154 

Public rejoicing : 

A scholiast on ' Lead a mighty chalked bull to the Capitol ' 
in Juvenal : ' Cretatum,' white, as for example Lucilius — 

and lead a chalked bull to the mighty Capitol.'' 

1155-6 

Roman manners. Luxury of women : 

Porphyrio : Lucilius used the term ' echinus ' as though it 
were a leathern bottle, for example when he says — 

a toilet-flask stained with dragon's-blood.'^ 

1157 
Paulus : ' Sicyonia,' a certain kind of footwear. Lucilius — 

and with her left hand she takes the fine ^ 
Sicyonian shoes off her feet. 

any rate. I would suggest that cui caused the number of 
the book to drop out. It may have been XVI or XII, but the 
quotation suggests an anecdote in book XI. 

* This was done on occasions of public rejoicing. 

<^ So I take cinnabari in the meaning of oriental dragon's- 
blood (obtained from a species of Dracaena growing in Socotra 
and Somaliland) which was used as a medicine, as a dye, 
and as a paint. But the staining of the flask might be due 
to its containing either this or the mineral red-lead or vermilion 
(also called cinnabari). 

^ cp. Lucret., IV, 1125 {pulchra in pedibus Sicyonia); but 
here perhaps it is her hand that is fine or pretty. 

375 



LUCILIUS 

1158 



Donatus, ad Ter., Amir., IV, 2, 16 : ' Stetisse ' . . 
Lucilius — 

Stat sentibus fundus. 



1159 

lulius Capitolinus, vHa Pertmacis, 9, 4 : Avaritiac suspi- 
cione privatus non caruit, cum apud vada Sabatia oppressis 
fenore possessoribus latius suos tenderet fines ; denique ex versu 
Luciliano — 

agrarius mergus 

est appellatus. 

1160 
Charisius, ap. G^.L., T, 211, 27K : ' Plurc.' . . . Lucilius— 
Plure foras vendunt quod f pro minore emptum f 
antique. 
Cp. Charis., ap. I, 109, 10. 



1161 

Festus, 342, 17: <Quin>tanara classem. . . . <Lu>- 
cilius sic meminit — 

quod Kj Kj - {classem quintanam) - yj adeptus, 

^^^^ AgTurius edd. vett. aerarius Saumaise grarius c(7(i. 

1160 proinde minore erat emptum M pro re est forte 
minore | emptum L minore coemptum in fine v. pon. 
Lindemann quod pro minore emptum cd. 211 om. cd. 
109 in pro latet fortasse pretio 

ii«i sufpl. W 



" Nonius, 392, 2 gives from bk. V of Lucilius — interea 
Stat sentibus pectus (fr. 239, cp. Gell., VIII, 5), so th&t fundus 
may be wrong here; if so, this is the same as fr. 239; if 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1158 

A neglected estate : 

Donatus : ' Stetisse ' . . . Lucilius^ 

The farm stands massed with thornbushes.^ 

1159 

A grasping landlord : 

lulius Capitolinus : Pertinax as a private citizen was not 
unsuspected of being miserly, when, his tenants being hard 
pressed by accumulated interest on debts, he pushed forward 
his boundaries along the waters of the lake of Sabate. In 
fact he was dubbed — 

a diving-bird ^ of the fields 

from a line of LuciHus. 

1160 
Business : 

Charisius : ' Plure ' . . . Lucilius — 
They go and sell out of doors at a greater price 
that which they bought at a lesser . . . 
said in archaic fashion. 

1161 

Political rank : 

Festus : ' Quintana classis ' . . . Lucilius mentions it in 
these words — 

because having attained the fifth-rate rank,*^ 

not, then we could include it in book XXX, as part of the 
satire about the lonely wife (pp. 355 ff.). Compare Caecilius, 
Remains, I, 540; and Virgil, Aen., XII, 407-8 {pulvere 
caelum stare). 

* probably a cormorant. 

" Cichor., 17-18. Originally the fifth was the lowest 
rank of those citizens who paid imposts. 

377 



LUCILIUS 

1162 

Varro, L.L., V, 44 : ' Velabrum ' a vehendo. Velaturam 
facere etiain nunc dicuntur qui id mercede faciunt. Merces 
huic vecturae, qui ratibus transibant, quadrans. Ab eo 
Lucilius scripsit — 

quadrantis ratiti. 

Cp. Fest., 376, 16 : Paul., ex F., 377, 4. 

1163-4 

Isidorus, Orig., XIX, 4, 10 : ' Catapirates ' linea cum massa 
plumbea qua maris altitude temptatur. Lucilius — 

Hiinc catapiratem puer eodem devoret unctum 
plumbi pauxillum rodus linique metaxam. 

Cp. Fest., 356, 13. 

1165 

Paulus, ex Fest., 49, 19 : ' Depuvire,' caedere. Lucilius — 
palmisque misellam depuviit me ; 
id est verberavit me. 

1166-7 

Donatus, ad Ter., Eun., IV, 4, 20: Verc pulchra est cuius 
forma nee odium nee convicium commeruit. Lucilius — 

et H}Tiinidis ac si 
ex facie florem delegeris. 

ii«3 devoret Gauckler, Linds., C.Q.V, 97 deferat Areval. 
deforet GaelJ. Sangerm. m. 2 defore m, 1 trih. lib. Ill 
Varges devorat u. op. musiv. Mus. Tun. ; v. p. 421 

1166 p^ Hymnidis ac si W at Hymnidis editt. in 
satyrarum I Hymnidis Mr. sec. cd. Lindenbrogii (in satyra 
athymnidis) 'athynnidi V athyonidi, atimidi, atin- 
nidi a/. satin C ' satri T sacri re//. (Hymnidis acriM) 

378 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1162 
Ferry-toll : 

Varro : ' Velabrum ' is derived from ' vehere.' Those who 
practise this {i.e. transport-service) for a fee are even now 
said to practise ' velatura.' The fee for this conveyance, in 
the case of those who habitually used a ferry-service of rafts, 
was a threepenny piece. From this comes the passage in 
Lucilius — 

of a raft-stamped '^ threepenny piece. 

1163-4 

Slaves : 

Isidore : ' Catapirates,' a line having a lump of lead with 
which the depth of the sea is tested. Lucilius — 

Let the slave-boy swallow down this sounding- 
line greased with that same syrup — even a little 
lump of lead and a spun rope of flax.^ 

1165 
Paulus : ' Depuvire,' to beat. Lucilius — 
and pounded poor little me with open hands ; 
that is, ' flogged me.' 

1166-7 
Hymnis : " 

Donatus : A truly beautiful woman is one whose figure has 
earned neither loathing nor reproach. Lucilius — 

as if too you shall have picked from Hymnis' face 
its bloom. 

" in fact this stamp was that of the head of a trireme. 

^ This is the interpretation of Lindsay, C.Q., V, 97, based 
on Gauckler's reading devoret. The second verse neatly 
describes the sounding-line. ' Metaxa ' could not mean raw 
silk at so early a date, unless we take it for the false Coan 
' silk.' 

<^ apparently Lucilius' mistress — see p. 287. 

379 



LUCILIUS 
1168 

Sergius, ap. G.L., IV, 564, 14 K : Per praepositiones sic 
fiunt soloecismi cum alia pro alia aut supervacua ponitur aut 
necessaria subtrahitur, ut apud Lucilium — 

Hymnis cantando quae me adseruisse ait ad se, 

pro ' apud se.' 

1169 
Varro, L.L., VII, 94 : Apud Lucilium — 
atque aliquas ibi si ab rebus clepsere foro qui, 
' clepsere ' dixit unde etiam alii clepere, id est compere. 

1170-1 

GeUius, III, 14, 8-9 : ' Dimidium ' . . . est non quod ipsum 
dimidiatum est, sed quae ex dimidiato pars altera est . . . 
Lucilius — 

Quidni ? Et scruta quidem ut vendat scrutarius laudat 

praefractam strigilem soleani improbus dimidiatam. 

Cp. Charis., ap. G.L. I, 126, 4 (strigilim). 

1172-3 

Festus, 346, 28 : ' Quartarios ' appellabant antiqui muliones 
mercenarios quod quartam partem quaestus capiebant. 
Lucilius — 

Porro homines nequam mahis ut quartarius cippos 
collisere omnes. 

^^^^ aliquas ibi si ab rebus W aliquot sibi si Kent 
aliquo sibi coni. Goetz-Schoell, ed. Varr. (sibus adiediv.) 
ali(iuo se illi . . . foroque Spengel ibusS ibi si abreptos 
M aliquos ibi ab rebus clepsere foro qui cdd. 

^^'3 collisere S collegcre (dd. colligere cd. 

380 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1168 

Sergiiis : Solecisms in prepositions come about in this 
way: when one is put instead of another; or is put re- 
dundantly; or is omitted, though necessary; for example 
in Lucilius — 

Hymnis, who says that by chanting she claimed me 
to herself as a slave, 

' ad se ' instead of ' apud se.' 

1169 
Villainy and vice. Various ill-doers : 
Varro : In a passage of Lucilius — 

and if any persons have stolen any articles from 
the stores there in the market, 

the poet used ' clepsere ' deriving it from the same source 
as others do in using ' clepere ' which means ' to grab.' 

1170-1 

Grellius : ' Dimidium ' is not that which has been itself 
halved, but that which is cither part of what has been 
halved. . . . Lucilius — 

Why not ? Besides, the lumber-n..'in cries up his 
old lumber that he may sell it — a scmpor broken off 
short, a halved sandal, the rascal ! 

1172-3 

Festus : The archaic writers used to raplo .' the term 
' quartarii ' for hired muleteers because t -cy used to take a 
fourth part of any profit made. Lucilius — 

And more than this the knavi-h fellows, like a 
villainous fourth-parter muleteer, knocked against 
all the gravestones.'* 

" The allusion, it seems, is to careless driving of loaded 
pack-animals or carts along a road lined with gravestones. 

38t 



LUCILIUS 

1174 

lul. Rufinianus, ap. R.L., 62, 16 H : ' Antiphrasis ' est 
figura scntcntiae cum quaedam negamus nos dicere et tamen 
diciraus; ut apud Lucilium — 

Non tango quod avarus homo est, quodque improbus 
mitto. 

1175 

Varro, L.L., VII, 32 : Dicta . . . apud veteres ' una 
canes.' . . . Lucilius — 

Nequam et magnus homo laniorum immanis canes ut. 

1176 

Donatus, ad Tor., Andr., I, 2, 12 : * Carnifex ' aut excarni- 
ficans dominum, aut ipse dignus carnifice, ut caro fiat, id est 
lanietur. Lucilius — 

career vix carcere dignus. 

Cp. id., ad Ter., Adelph. Ill, 2, 12; Eun., Ill, 2, 19; IV, 
3,3; Phorm., 11,3,26. 

1177 
Donatus, ad Ter., Adelph., II, 1, 22 : ' Ex tuis virtutibus.' 
Sic veteres per ironiam virtutes pro flagitiis dicebant. 
Lucilius — 

animo ac virtutibus 

Cic, ad Alt., XVI, 11, 1 : Perstringam sine ulla contu- 
melia Siccae aut Septimiae, tantum ut sciant rralhes -naihoiv 
sine vallo Luciliano eum ex 0. Fadi filia liberos habuisse. 

^^'* trih. lib. I Becker, // L homo est quodque R. 
Stephanus modo est neque quod cdd. mitto D (F.) 
oraitto cdd. 

1176 sic Donat. ad Eun. Ill, 2, 19 ; IV, 3, 3; Adelph., Ill, 
2, 12; Phorm., II, 3, 26; ad Andr., I, 2, 12 : career eis vix A 
carcere vix CT eris vix M Jortasse career et is W 

11" Cic. : (^oAAo) Gurlitt, Philol., LVII, 403 sqq. alii 

alia Jortasse exit us senur. vel septenar. 

" Lucilius mocks at what is an oratorical device. 
*• The context was ironical, as Donatus shows. 
382 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 
1174 

Julius Rufinianus : ' Antiphrasis ' is a figure of uttered 
thought, when we deny that we are saying certain things but 
nevertheless say them ; for example in Lucilius — 

That he is stingy, — I won't touch upon that ; 
and that he is a villain, — I pass it over." 

1175 

Varro : The archaic writers used ' canes ' as a nominative 
singular feminine . . . Lucilius — 

A big rascal of a man, like an awful butchers' dog. 

1176 
Donatus, on ' carnifex ' in Terence : Tearing the flesh oflf 
his' master, or himself worthy of a ' carnifex ' so as to become 
mere ' caro,' flesh; that is, be torn to rags. Lucilius writes 
(using ' career ' in two senses) — 

a jailbird hardly worthy of a jail. 

1177 
Donatus, on ' because of your brave deeds ' in Terence : 
Thus the old writers in irony used to speak of deeds of virtue 
for deeds of shame. Lucilius — 



with spirit and deeds of virtue 



Wanton ways ; and the like : 

Cicero : Without any insulting word for Sicca or Septimia 
I will lightly touch on it {sc. Antony's lust), and no more than 
enough to let the childrens' children know without what- 
you-may-call-it — (the Lucilian word) that he (Antony) has 
begotten children out of the daughter of Gaius Fadius.' 

' It is not known who Sicca and Septimia were, but the 
latter was perhaps the daughter of the freedman C. Fadius. 
By vallo (^aAAa» ?,) Lnciliano Cicero meant perhaps simply 
' Lucilian licence ' ; it does not matter whether we read vallo 
(stake — cp. palus in Hor., iS'., I, 8, 5) or (f)aXXa>. Some think 
vallo = 'barrier,' 'guardedness.' By TraiSej 7rat8cov Cicero mean s 
the Romans, descendants of Aeneas (Homer, II. , XX, 308-9). 

3^3 



LUCILIUS 

1178 

Servius auctus, ad Aen., X, 184 : ' Pyrgi veteres.' 
Lucilius — 

scorta Pyrgensia. 

1179 
Paulus, 185, 4 :— 

noctipugam<(inedica) 

Lucilius cum dixit obscenum significat. 
Cp. Fcst., 184, 8. 

1180 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., C, I, 27, 1 : ' Natis in usuin lactitiae 
scyphis,' Natis pro factis, ut apud Lucilium est — ♦ 

" Podicis, Hortensi, est ad earn rem nata palaestra." 

1181 

Donatus ad Tcr., Eun., V, 2, 60 : ' Dabit hie pugnam 
aliquam.' ' Pugnam ' pro stupro . . . ut Lucilius — 

" Vicimus o soeii et magnam pugnavimus pugnam." 

Cp. id., ad Ter., Adelph. V, 3, 57 ; 4, 5. 

1182 

Paulus, ex Test., 23 : ' Bubinare ' est mcnstruo mulicrum 
sanguine inquinare. Lucilius — 

Haec inbubinat at contra te inbulbitat {ille). 

Inbulbitarc est puerili steicore inquinare. 

ii'8 gcorta Pyrgensia cd. Pyrgensia scorta coni. Mr. 

ii'9 medica suppl. ex Fest. vbi legitur * ** lib. II obscae * * * c 
raedica fortasse addend, ut Lucilii obscacnam el tribuend. 
lib. II; vel in lib. II latet tiomen Lucilii. noctipugam Sau- 
maise -lugam, -nugam, -iugam c(l(l. 

^^^•^ podicis Meyer iudicis edd. vett, pudicis odd. 

^^^2 haec inquit inbubinat Paul. <ille> suppl. D 
(I.) trib. lib. XXIX L 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1178 

Servius (supplemented) on ' ancient Pyrgi ' in Virgil : 
Lucilius — 

whores of Pyrgi. 

1179 

Paulus : When LuciUus has used the word ' noctipuga ' he 
means something which is obscene — 

the midwife " the nightly-poked slut 

1180 

Porphyrio on ' Cups born for jollity to use ' in Horace : 
* Natis ' instead of ' made,' as we iind in Lucilius — 

*'It is the rump, my dear Hortensius, that provides 
physical jerks ^ born for that purpose." 

1181 

Donatus, on ' This fellow will do some doughty deeds ' 
in Terence : ' Pugnam ' instead of ' stuprum ' (defilement) . . . 
for example Lucilius — 

" Allies, we have won ! We have fought a doughty 
fight! " " 

1182 

Paulus : ' Bubinare * means to defile with the blood from 
women's monthly flow. Lucilius says — 

She stains you, but on the other hand he soils 
you.'' 

' Inbulbitare ' means to defile with a boy's dung. 

" medica is rightly added from Festus, 184, 8; we might 
also add obscaena or obscaenajn from the same imperfect 
passage. Festus never adds the relevant book, so Lachmann 
rightly decides that in Festus lib. II is corrupt. 

'' or, ' a wrestling school.' 

'^ Perhaps a line or an adaptation from Ennius. 

'^ cf. Marx, o^ 1186. 

VOL. III. C C 



LUCILIUS 

1183 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 6, 22 : ' Quoniam in propria non 
pelle quiessein ' . . . Hoc scilicet inde sumptum est quod 
veteres in pellibus dormirent ; cuius rei et Lucilius testis est 
cum dicit — 

Perminxi lectum, inposui t pcdem f pellibus labes. 



1184 

Festus, 486, 28: ' Squarrosos '<ab eadem squamarum> 
. . . similitudine ait dic<tos quorum cutis exsur>gat ob 
adsiduam inlu<viem. Lucilius — 

baro)num ac rupicum squarr^osa incondita)rostra. 

Cp. Paul., ex F., 487, 7. 

1185-6 
Nonius, 214, 2: ' Mendum.' . . . feminino Lucilius — 
Nam in quibus mendae 
omnibus in rebus flunt fierique potissunt, 

1187 

Macrobius, ap. G.L., V, 618, 14 K : Apud Latinos impera- 
tivus nascitur ab infinito abiecta ultima . . . ' ades ' et 
' prodes.' Lucilius — 

Prodes amicis. 

^^^^ lectum perminxi D (I.) permixi Holder per 
mihi lectum cdd. pede Petschenig imposuique puden- 
dam 1) (1.) pellibus labes Holder prob. M labem D 
(I.) pedem pellibus habreis Sto., W. St., XXVII, 215 

pedem pellibus habes cdd. trib. lib. Ill Francken 

iis" suppl. ex Paul. 

^^^^ in seclud. Mr. ut D (I.) inquimus L 

^^^^ fierique cdd. fierive Mr. {rede ?) 

386 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1183 

Porphyrio, on ' Since I did not rest upon my own skin ' 
in Horace : ... Of course this phrase is chosen on the 
ground that the ancients used to sleep on skins. Of this fact 
Lucilius is a witness when he says — 

I wetted all the bed and made messes on the skins." 

1184 

Festus : He says ' squarrosi ' is a term . . . used for those 
whose skin stands out from constant uncleanliness, derived 
from the same resemblance to scales. Lucilius — 

scurfy uncouth mugs ^ of blockheads and clowns. 

1185-6 
Life in general. Faults : 

Nonius : ' Mendum ' ... in the feminine Lucilius — 
For in the case of all those people where faults 
are or can be found in their lives.'' 

1187 

Friendship : 

Macrobius : Among the Latins the imperative takes its 
rise from the infinitive, the last syllable being dropped away 
. . . ' ades ' and ' prodes.' Lucilius — 

Help your friends. 

'^ For pedem read pede = memhro virili ? It has been 
thought that here we have the origin of Horace's ' turn 
immundo somnia visu nodurnani vestevi maculant ventremque 
supinum'' {Sat., I, 5, 84-5); if so then this fr. probably 
belongs to the satire on Lucilius' journey (book III). But 
Marx thinks that Lucilius gives an example of over-drinking 
(cp. Hor., S., I, 3, 90 comminxit ledum potus.) In the passage 
here cited by Porphyrio, Horace may really mean ' since I 
did not rest content in my own condition ' (pellis my own skin). 

* rostrum, soldiers' slang for face ; cp. Spanish rostro, face. 

" Marx completes the sense : — there one can generally find 
some means of correction. 

387 

cc 2 



LUCILIUS 

1188 

Nonius, 449, 19 : ' Interfici ' et ' occidi ' et inaninialia posse 
veteres vcliemeiiti auctoritate posucrunt. . . . Lucilius — 

Intereunt labuntur eunt rursuni omnia vorsum. 



1189-90 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 3, 124 : Porro autem Stoici 
existimant perfectae sapientiae virum omnia habere; in quo 
sensu et Lucilius vcrsatus sic ait — 

Nondum etiam <[qui) haec omnia habebit, 
formonsus dives liber rex solus feretur. 

Qui tamen poeta non simpliciter hoc sed per derisum 
Stoicorum dicit. 

1191 

Interpres Veron., ad Aen., IX, 373 : ' Sub ' pro ' parum ' 
ponitur. Lucil. — 

Facti subpudet t ut di t 

1192 

Varro, L.L., VII, 30 : Apud Lucilium — 

Quid tibi ego ambages f ambiu f scribere coner ? 

profectum a verbo ' ambe ' quod inest in ' ambitu ' et 
' ambitioso.' 

^^^8 eunt rursum D (I.) e. vestra Linds. euntur cdd. 

1189 <qui> L <hic> M ciia,m. Imec cdd. 

1190 feretur Mr, vocetur edd. vett. ut extet qui taraen 
M testeturque tamen cdd. (testatur Par.) irib. lib. 
XVNL 

^^^^ ut dico coni. ]\[ tu di post sul)pudet leg. Mai errore 
ut videtur. 

^^^2 ambiu, ambui cdd. Ambivi editt. amborum coni. 
M sed nation c-ise ex ambages videtur. 

388 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1188 

Bad times : 

Nonius : The old writers have established with strong 
authority that ' interfici ' and ' occidi ' can be used even of 
lifeless things, . . . Lucilius — 

Meanwliile everything goes to ruin and goes 
slipping back again. 

1189-90 

Stoic ideas : 

Porphyrio : But further the Stoics believe that a man of 
perfect wisdom has all things, Lucilius also, dealing with the 
same idea, speaks as follows — 

But not even he who has all this will alone be 
called a handsome fellow, a rich one, a gentleman, a 
king amongst us,*^ 

But that poet does not state this without a purpose, but 
in derision of the Stoics. 

1191 

Repentance : 

A commentator, on Virgil : ' Sub ' is put for * parum.' 
LuciKus — 

He feels rather ashamed for what he did . . . 

1192 

Disgust of Lucilius : 
Varro : In a passage of Lucilius — 

\Vhy should I try to write you roundabout 
ramblings ? 

' ambages ' comes from the word ' ambe,' which is contained 
in ' ambitus ' and ' ambitiosus,' 

° Plut., de adul. et am., 16, 58 E etra rwv y-kv ILtojikcov ovBk 
CLKOveLU €VLOL vTTOfji€vovoi Tou oo(f)6v o/nou TrXovoiov KaXov euyevrj 
ISaaiXda TTpoaayopeuouToju . 



LUCILIUS 

1193 
Festus, 164, 11 (cp. Paul., 165, 3) :— 
Nequam aurum est ; auris quovis vehementius 
ambit. 

Hoc vcrsu Lucili significari ait Sinnius Capito nequam esse 
aurum quod auris laedat, vel pondere inaurium, cum mol- 
lissima pars auris inciditur; vel ex auro intellegi pecuniam, 
cuius respectu et nimia cupiditate homines ad peccandum 
adduci. 

1194-5 

Scholiasta ad luv., Ill, 143 : Lucilius — 
Aurum atque ambitio specimen virtutis virique est. 
Tantum habeas quantum ipse sies tantique habearis. 

1196-1208 

Lactant., Div. Instit., VI, 5, 2 : Quaecunque autem in defini- 
tionera virtutis solent dicere, paucis versibus colligit et 
enarrat Lucilius ... — 

Virtus, Albine, est pretium persolvere verum 
quis in versamur quis vivdmus rebus potesse ; 
virtus est homini scire id quod quaeque habeat res ; 
virtus scire homini rectum utile quid sit honestum, 
1200 quae bona quae mala item, quid inutile turpe in- 
honestum ; 

^^^^ quovis B quod vis M quoivis L quod vi 
D (F.) nequam est aurum aures quoius S quod vis cdd. 

1194 virique Bergk, PhiloL, XIV, 390 utrimque L 
utrumque D (I.) ubique iSchurzfleisch utriquc cdd. 
trib. lib. XIX Fiske 

^^'^ quantum habeas D (F.) (niaiitum ijisc \V tan- 
tum ipse cdd. 

1196-1208 irib, lib, X VII Corpet XXX Fiske 

390 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1193 
The value of gold : 
Festus : — 

Gold is a rascal ; it goes the rounds of our ears,*^ 
demanding our votes more earnestly than anything. 

Sinnius Capito says that in this line of LuciUus the meaning 
is that gold is a rascal because it hurts the ears, for example, 
by weight of ear-rings, when the softest part of the ear is 
cut into ; or it may be that by ' gold ' we are to understand 
' money ' with a view to which, and with undue lust for it, 
men are led to do wrong. 

1194-5 
A Scholiast : Lucilius — 

Gold and going the rounds for votes are a token 
of a man and his manliness.^ See that you hold 
and are held to be worth as much as you represent. 

1196-1208 
Virtue : 

Lactantius : But whatever men are wont to say towards 
making a definition of virtue Lucilius brings together and tells 
in a few verses ... — 

Manliness or virtue, my dear Albinus, is being 
able to pay in full a fair price in our business dealings 
and in the affairs which life brings us ; virtue is 
knowing what each affair has within it for a man ; 
virtue is knowing what is right and useful and 
honourable for a man and what things are good 
and again what are bad, what is shameful, useless, 

" There is a pun on aurum and auris. ambit, ' canvasses.' 
Notice the assonances in this and the next fr. 

* ' ambitio,' canvassing. Those who read utrique est see 
an allusion to the brothers Postumii (see next fr.) — cf. Marx, 
and Cichor., 333 fiF. The readings of both lines are disputed. 

391 



LUCILIUS 

virtus quaerendae finem re scire inodunique ; 
virtus divitiis pretium persolx ere posse ; 
virtus id dare quod re ipsa debetur honori, 
hostem esse atque inimicum liominum morumque 
malorum 
1205 contra defensorem houiinuni morumque honor um, 
hos magni facere, his bene velle, his vivere amicum, 
commoda praeterea patriai prima putare, 
deinde parentum, tertia iam postremaque nostra. 

Cp. Div. Inslit., VI, 6, 7 (v. 1201); 6, 10 (v. 1202); 6, 18 
(v. 1207). 

1209 

Festus, ap. C.G.L., IV, XVIII : ' Pipatio ' est clamor 
plorantis acerba voce. Lucilius — 

" Petis pipas? Da." " Libet " <(inquit.) 

Id est, " petis clamas ? Da." " luvat," inquit. 

Cp. Paul., ex F., 263, 4 (pipatio clamor plorantis lingua 
Oscorum). 

1210 

Donatus, ad Ter., Eun., II, 3, 11 (' senium *) : * Senex * ad 
aetatem refertur, ' senium ' ad convicium ; sic Lucilius — 

t aes t ait quidam " senium atque insulse sophista." 

1201 re L rei crld. 

1207 patriai Burmann patriae cdd. 

1209 <quare me insidiis petis> coni. M curve palam 
nunc me petit pipans ccmi. Sto., W. St. XXVII, 224-6 petit 
pipas cla cd. 

1210 OS ait M ast ait Schoell atqui dei male te Mr. 
aes ait cd. V at sait cd. B at ait cd. T quidam M 
quid iam Schoell quidam {vel quidem) the {vel te) cdd. 
trib.lib. XFMr. 

392 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

dishonourable; virtue is knowing the means and 
the end of seeking a thing, virtue is being able to 
pay in full the price from our store ; virtue is giving 
that which in all truth is due to honour, being an 
enemy and no friend of bad men and manners, and 
on the other hand being a defender of good men 
and manners ; prizing greatly the latter, wishing 
them well and being a life-long friend to them; 
and besides all this, thinking our country's interests 
to be foremost of all, our parents' next, and then 
thirdly and lastly our own." 



1209 
Invective : 

Festus : ' Pipatio ' ^ is the noise of one bewailing in a shrill 
voice. Lucilius — 

" Do you ask it, do you cheep? Out with it ! " 
** With pleasure," said he. 

That is, " do you ask it, do you cry ? Out with it." "That 
suits me " said he. 



1210 

Donatus : ' Senex ' is used with reference to age, ' senium ' 
with reference to a sneer ; thus Lucihus — 

Says someone, " you old dotard, you fool of a 
quibbler." 

" These awkward Latin sentences give the Stoic idea 
adapted to human needs. Albinus may be Spurius Postumius, 
consul in 110, or more likely his brother Aulus who was defeated 
by Jugurtha in the same year. But see Cichor., 350-4. 

* Pipatio was an Oscan word (Paul., ex P., 263, 4), 

393 



LUCILIUS 

1211 

Festus, 260, 2 : Piscinae publicac hodieque nomen manet, 
ipsa non extat; ad quara et natatum et exercitationis 
alioqui causa veniebat popuhis ; undc Lucilius ait — 

pro obtuso ore pugil pisciniensis reses. 

1212 
Nonius, 231, 36 : ' Utres ' . . . ncutri Lucilius — 
Andronis flacci teget utria. 

1213 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 85, 6 K : ' Gibber ' . . . ipsum 
vitium dicitur. . . . Lucilius loquitur — 

gibbere magno. 

1214 

Nonius, 43, 11 : Habebatur nomen hoc [verna) pro vitabili 
maledicto. . . . Lucilius — 

vernam ac cercupithecon. 

1215 

Varro, L.L., V, 80 : 'Praetor ' dictus qui praeiret iure et 
exercitu ; a quo ait Lucilius — 

Ergo praetorum est ante et praeire. 

^^^^ piscinensis T (c/. Dessau 6339 piscinensium) pis- 
ciniensis vel sim. Fest. {prob. Souter, Arch. f. lat. Lex., XI, 130- 
31 ; Class. Rev., XXXIII, 153) reses <hic est> co7u. M 

1212 Andronis Mr. <oi>os>dv8pd)v(.os C 328-333 {quitrib. lib. 
XXVI vel XXIX quasi senar.) andronius cdd. teget 

cdd. leget Scriverius. 



" This was on the Appian Way outside the Porta Capena. 
Lucilius seems to compare a battered person with a retired 
boxer. 

394 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1211 

Festus : There still remains to this very day the name of the 
' Public Swimming Pool,' but the pool itself has gone. It 
was a place to which people used to come to swim and otherwise 
for the purpose of taking exercise. Hence the words of 
Lucilius — 

to judge from his battered face, a retired boxer, 
haunter of the Swimming Pool.^ 

1212 
Nonius : ' Utres ' . . . Lucihus has it in the neuter — 
It will cover the skin-bags of Andron the flap- 
eared.^ 

1213 
Charisius : ' Gibber ' ... is used of the actual deformity 
. . . Lucilius says — 

with a big hump. 

1214 
Nonius : This name ' vema ' was held to be a jibe which 
ought to be avoided. . . . LuciHus — 

a home-slave and a long-tailed monkey. 

1215 

War : 

Varro : ' Praetor ' is a term applied to him who was to ' go 
before ' (praeiret) in a court of justice and in an army. Whence 
Lucilius says — 

Therefore it is the duty of leaders to go in front 
and lead. 

^ I accept Miiller's correction and refer the fragment to 
something which will cover someone's large flabby ears, 
here called utria. Cichorius (who tries to restore bits of 
two senarii) believes that Lucilius here uses the Greek proverb 
ovog 'AvSptuvto? in mockery of M. Fulvius Flaccus a man of 
drunken habits (Plut., G. Gracch., 14-L5), and that he changed 
ossa to utria (Cichor., Untersuch., 328-333). 

395 



LUCILIUS 

1216 

Isidonis, Orig., XVII, 7, 27 : ' Subcrics ' arbor ex qua 
validissimus cortex natatorius cxtrahitur . . . 

Festus, 416, 16 : <' Suberies '> * * * * ex qua cortex * * * * 
Lucilius — 

<(suberiem)****ti hibernacula - ^ 



1217 

Paulus, ex Festo, 3, 28 : — 

^decumana) Albesia scuta 

dicebantur quibus Albenses, qui sunt Marsi generis, usi 
sunt. Haec eadem ' decumana ' vocabantur quod essent 
amplissima, ut ' decumani fluctus.' 

1218-9 

Festus, 538, 3: suppl. ex Paulo: <'Thomices' Graeco>no- 
mine appellantur <ex cannabi inpoIita> et sparto leviter 
tortae <rcstes, ex quibus funes> fiunt. Lucilius — 

Vidimus {vinctum 
thoniice . . . can)abina. 

1220 

Festus, 474, 20 : ' Sargus,' piscis genus qui in Aegyptio 
mari fere nascitur. Lucilius — 

quern praeclarus helops, quem Aegypto sargus 
movebit. 

121C Joj-ta.sse sen. vel. septen. suberiem largam nacti 
hibernacula ponunt coni. ]\I 
121' (rib. LnciJ. Mr. 
1218-9 gKppi^ Ursin. 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1216 

Isidore : ' Suberies ' is a tree from which is pulled a very 
strong cork which can float . . . Festus : ' Suberies ' . 
from which cork. . . . Liicilius — 

the cork-tree . . . winter-quarters . . .'^ 

1217 

Paulus : The name ' Albesian ' — 

Albesian shields, number tens 

was given to shields which were used by the Albenses, who 
are a part of the Marsian tribe. They were also called 
' decumana ' (huge) on the ground that they were very large, 
as waves were called ' decumani.' * 

1218-9 

Festus (with Paulus) : ' Thomices ' is a Greek name used 
as a term for ropes lightly twisted out of rough hemp and 
broom," out of which cords are made. LuciUus — 

We have seen him bound with hempen string. 

1220 
Eating and drinking : 

Festus : ' Sargus,' a kind of fish which is produced mostly 
in the Egyptian sea. LuciHus — 

whose taste the renowned sword-fish or the sarge 
from Egypt will move. 

" In view of the abundance of the cork-tree in parts of 
Spain, Marx may be right in seeing a reference to military 
service in that region. 

'' See above, pp. 186-7. On the attribution to Lucilius, see 
note on fr. 597. Marx suggests that the shields were gifts 
from a ^larsian cKent — see book IV, lines 159-60. The Albenses 
were the people of Alba Fucens or Fucentia. 

"^ the Spanish ' esparto.' The fragment may deal with the 
handing over of Mancinus to the Xumantines in 136 B.C. 
(Cichor., 37-9), or with Viriathus. thomix^ do}yi.i4, dd)[xtyi. 

397 



LUCILIUS 

1221 

Varro, L.L., VII, 47 : Apud Luciliuin ... — 
sumere te atque amian. 

Piscium nomina sunt eorumque in Graecia origo. 
Cp. Paul., ex Test., 21, 9. 

1222-3 

(Jellius, XX, 8, 4 : Cum quaereremus quae alia item senes- 
cente luna tabescerent, nonne Lucilium, inquit, nostrum 
meministis dicere — 

Luna alit ostrea et implet echinos, muribus fibras 
et iecur addit. 

1224 

Cledonius, ap. G.L., V, 40, 20 K : ' Haec pampinus ' 
Lucilius — 

purpureamque uvam facit albam pampinum habere. 

1225 

Paulus, ex Fest., 103, 1 : ' Mantisa ' additamentum dicitur 
lingua Tusca quod ponderi adicitur, sed deterius et quod sine 
uUo usu est. Lucilius — 

mantisa obsonia vincit. 

1226-7 

Cicero, de Fin., II, 8, 23 : Mundos, clegantis, optimis cocis 
pistoribus piscatu aucupio venatione, his omnibus exquisitis, 
vitantes cruditatem, quibus — 

defusum e pleno y^f}V(jit,ov . . . vinum, 

1221 fortasse surae rcte {init. septenar.) 

^-23 iecur Keller pecu velsim. aid. 

1226 -^pvaiiov Munro, A.J. P., 1879, 219 siet (Orell.) 
hir siphoneve Mr. hrysizon (reZ hyrsizon, hirsizon) cdd, 
(hirsyphon cd. Morel.) fortasse scripsii Luc. est xP^^'-^°^ 
(sit Cic.) 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1221 

Varro : In a passage of Lucilius ... — 

that you take this and a tunny. 

They are the names of fish, and their origin is in Greece. 

1222-3 

GelUus : When we proceeded to ask what other things 
besides pined away when the moon is on the wane, do you not 
remember, said he, that our Lucilius says — 

The moon nourishes oysters and fills out sea- 
urchins and to sea-mice she adds guts and a liver. 

1224 

Cledonius : Lucilius has ' pampinus ' as a feminine — 

and it {the sun) causes the pale " vine-shoot to have 
purple grapes. 

1225 

Festus : ' Mantisa,' a term used in the Tuscan language 
for something additional which is thrown in as a makeweight, 
but which is of less worth and of no use at all. Lucilius — 

the makeweight overtops ^ the viands. 

1226-7 

Cicero : Neat and elegant persons enjoying the best chefs, 
confectioners, bakers, the best products of fishing, fowling and 
hunting, all these of the very choicest, avoiding over-eating; 
persons who have — 

vin d'or poured out from a full cask, 

" i.e. not yet decorated by the ripe colour of grapes. There 
is no connexion with the foregoing fr. 

* in price or in the opinion of the eaters, of. Marx ad 1208. 

399 



LUCILIUS 

ut ait Lucilius — 

ciii nil dum fit vas et sacculus abstulit . . . 

adhibentibus ludos et quae sequuntur . . . hos ergo asotos 
bene quidem vivere aut beate numquam dixerim. 

Cp. Grammat., ap. G.L., V, 590, 9 K (vinum cui nihil 
sacculus abstulit). 

1228-9 

Diomedes, ap. G.L., I, 365, 9 K : ' Praefoco praefocavi.' 
Probus quasi novam vocem miratur. . . . Lucilius . . ait — 

et sufFocare lagunas 
conatur. 

1230 
Schol. Vatic, ad Verg.,6''.,IV, 376 : . . . Lucilius ' mantela ' 
dicit mappas — 

mantela merumque. 

1231 
Nonius, 212, 2 : ' Lympha ' . . . masculine Lucilius — 
impennixtiun lymphorem. 

1232 
Schol. ad luv., IX, 5 : ' Crustula,' species operis pistorii. 
Lucilius — 

Gustavi crustula solus. 

Cp. Porphyr., ad Hor., S. I, 1, 25. 
1233 

Nonius, 207, 14 : ' Guttur . . . masculino. . . . Lucilius — 
et ventrem et gutturem eundem. 

^227 dum fit vas M dempsitnix Lambin. dum situs B 
nil dum situis [et] Dziatzko, Bh. Mns., XLIV, 635 dum sit 
vis cdd. abstulit Gramm. de dub. nom. abstulerit Cic. 
trih. lib. XXII B, Mr., Dziatzko {petUamet.); lib. IV D (I).; 
lib. V M 

1228 lagunas iJ/o/iac.m. 2 lacunas ?n. 1, Par. .4 laguna 
Par. B lacuna M lagoenas Loewe 

400 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

as Lucilius says — 

wine from which, in the making,'* neither the press 
nor the straining-cloth has taken anything, 

throwing in dramatic plays and all that follows ... — 
well, that abandoned men of this sort live a really good or a 
happy life I would never admit, 

1228-9 

Diomedes : ' Praefoco, praefocavi.' Probus wonders at 
this word as though it were a novelty. . . . Lucilius . . . 
says — 

and he tries to stop tight the flagons.^ 

1230 

A scholiast, on ' mantelia ' in Virgil : Lucilius used 
' mantela ' for ' mappae ' — 

cloths and neat wine. 

1231 
Nonius : ' Lympha ' ... in the masculine in Lucilius — 
unmixed fluid. 

1232 

(c) Habits of eating. A parasite : 

A scholiast on Juvenal : ' Crustula,' a species of pastry. 
Lucilius — 

All alone I got a taste of little pastries. 



Gluttony ? : 

Nonius : ' Guttur ' ... in the masculine. . . . Lucilius — 

both belly and gullet the same. 

" The reading is doubtful. 

** or, if lacuna is right, ' to stifle in a pool.' 

401 

VOL. III. D D 



LUCILIUS 

1234 

Gellius, IV, 16, 6 : Lucilius in eodem casu ' victu ' et 
'anil ' dicit, non ' victui ' nee ' anui,' in hisce versibus — 

quod sumptum atque epulas victu praeponis honesto. 

Cp. Non., 501, 23. 

1235 

Nonius, 219, 30 : ' Penus ' generis feminini. Lucilius — 
Magna penus parvo spatio consumpta peribit. 

Cp. Priscian., ap. G.L., II, 170, 18 : 261, 1 K. 



1236 

Servius, ad Aen., I, 726 : ' Laquearibus.' Principaliter 
' lacus ' dicitur; ut Lucilius — 

Resultabant aedesque lacusque. 

Cp. Isid., Orig., XV, 8, 6 : XIX, 12. 

1237 

Festus, 426, 6 : ' Sollo ' Osce dicitur id quod nos ' totum ' 
vocamus. Lucilius — 

vasa quoque omnino rediniit non sollo dupundi ; 

id est non tota. 

1234 trih. lib. IV D (F.) 

1236 resultabant L rcsultantes edd. vet. aedesque 
lacusque resultant B resultant cdd. 

1237 redimit D (F.) dirimit cd. irib. lib. XI Corpet 

" Gellius goes on to give another example which we know 
from Nonius to come from book VII (see lines 8(»3-r)) ; this fr. 
therefore probably belongs to books I- VII. 

402 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1234 
Revelries : 

Grellius : Lucilius in this same (dative) case uses the form 
' victu ' and ' anu,' not ' victui ' and ' anui,' in these lines — 

because you put spending and feastings before 
honest living." 

1235 

Xonius : ' Penus ' of the feminine gender. Lucilius — 

A great foodstore will be gobbled away in a short 
space of time and will cease to exist. 

1236 

Servius on ' laquear ' in Virgil : The original form used is 
' lacus ' ; for example Lucilius — 

The room, the panels of its ceiling leaped again 
with the sound. 

1237 

A poor host : 

Festus : In Oscan ' sollo ' is a term for what we call whole. 
Lucilius — 

And to be sure ^ he buys up unsound utensils each 
valued at a two-copper piece ; 

' non sollo,' that is, not whole. 

* or, ' He hires . . . valued two asses in aU.' Or possibly 
'2 lb. vessels.' But dirimit (sets apart) may be right; 
Corpet assigned this fr. to the satire describing Scipio's 
purging of the Roman camp at Xumantia — see book XI, 
frs. 430 ff.; Marx quotes Plut., apophth. Scip. Min., 16, 
201 C ru)v S' dpyvpeoju e/cTTcu/Lta ov [xel^ov 8vo Xirpwv ovvexcoprjae ; 
of. also Cichor., 30^5. This gives the capacity, or the 
weight of the vessels. Note that sollus-a-um (cf. oAo?, salvas, 
solidus, sailers) is here indeclinable ; or read solla. 

403 
DD 2 



LUCILIUS 

1238 

Porphjrrio, ad Hor., S., II, 4, 81 : ' Mappas ' antiqui dice- 
bant quae nunc mantelia. Lucilius ait — 

et velli mappas. 

1239 

Festus, 550, 18 : Tappulam legem convivalem ficto nomine 
conscripsit iocoso carmine Valerius ^'alentinus cuius meminit 
Lucilius hoc mode — 

Tappulam rident legem concenae opimi. 

1240 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S. I, 6, 12 : ' contra Laevinum Valeri 
genus.' Id est Valerius Laevinus . . . periphrasin autem 
necessario fecit, sicut Lucilius cum dicit — 

Valeri sententia dia 

quia scilicet nomen hoc quattuor brevium syllabamm est, 
et ob id non potest in hexametrum versum recipi. 

1241 

Gellius, II, 24, 3 : Sed post id senatus consultum lex Fanuia 
lata est. . . . Hanc Lucilius poeta legem significat cum dicit — 

Famii centussis misellus. 

Cp. Macrob., Ill, 17, 5. 

1238 trib. lib. V Mr. 

1239 concenae D (I.) concerae (congerrae) S cantcrii 
coni. M concere Ursin. conterere vel committere re/ 
confer, contef cdd. optimi 0. Mueller. 

" Marx takes ' velli ' as perfect indicative. But this form 
is very rare. I take it that there is a reference to attempts 
to steal napkins at a dinner; cf. Catull. XII, 1-3. 

" Cf. Bruns, Fontes, ed. 7, p. 119, and in C.I.L., V, 
Suppl. ItaL, 898 (lex Tappula of Tappo). The fr. of 
Lucilius is corrupt; cf. Cichor., 341-5. 

404 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1238 

Thieving guests : 

Porphyrio : The ancients called ' mappae ' what are now 
called ' mantelia ' (cloths). Lucilius says — 

and that the napkins were grabbed." 

1239 

Laws fictitious and real about eating and drinking : 

Festus : Valerius Valentinus composed as a humorous 
poem under an invented name a Tappulan law about banquets. 
Lucilius mentions it in this manner — 

Fat fellow-feeders laugh at Tappo's ^ law. 

1240 

Porphyrio, on ' contra Laevinum Valeri genus ' in Horace : 
That is Valerius Laevinus . . . but the periphrasis he made 
of necessity, just as Lucilius when he says — 

the godly pronouncement of Valerius ^ 

for the reason, of course, that this name {in the nominative) 
is of four short syllables and because of that cannot be taken 
into a hexameter line. 

1241 

GreUius : But after that decree of the Senate, the Fannian 
law was passed.*^ . . . This is the law meant by Lucilius 
when he says — 

Fannias' wretched little hundred. 

'' I accept Cichorius 348 in referring this to the same 
context as the last fr. But see Fiske, 257, 272. cp. Hor., 
*S., I, 2, 31 . . . sententia dia Catonis. 

<* in 161 B.C.; it tried to check expense except upon olus 
et far et vinum (cp. Athenae., VI, 274, c-f.). Gellius says it 
allowed to be spent at the Roman games, and also at the 
plebeian games and at the Saturnalia and on certain other 
days, a hundred as-pieces by each person for every day and on 
ten other days in every month a total of three hundred, but 
on aU other days ten for each day. 

405 



LUCILIUS 

1242-3 

Varro, L.L., IX, 81 : Etiam illud putant esse causae cur 
non sit analogia, quod Lucilius scribit — 

decussis 
(sive decussibus est). 

Qui errant quod Lucilius non debuit dubitare, quod 
utrumque. 

1244 

Paulus, ex Fest., 561, 25: 'Vitiligo' in corpore hominis 
macula alba quam Graeci dA(/>o»/ vocant . . . Lucilius — 

" Haec odiosa mihi vitiligo est." " Num dolet? " 
inquit. 

1245 

Paulus, 343, 5 : ' Querqueram ' frigidam cum tremore a 
Graeco KapKapa certum est dici, unde et career. Lucilius — 

iactans me ut febris querquera. 

Cp. Fest., 342, 32. 

1246 

Festus, 548, 16 : ' Tama ' dicitur cum labore viae sanguis 
in crura descendit et tumorem facit. Lucilius — 

inguen ne existat, papulae, tama, ne boa noxit. 

Cp. Paul., ex F., 549, 5. 

1247 

Charis., ap. G.L., I, 214, 8 K : ' Pedetemptim.' Lucilius — 

pedetemptim hue ire salutem. 

1245 querquera terror coiii. ^\ trib. lib. Ill M 

i2»7 hue ire L hunc fcrre salutem M pedeteraptimne 
hunc D (I.) pedetemptim nunc B cur Mr. pede- 
temptim hunc resalutem cdd. 

" decussis was a piece of ten asses ; the word could be 
treated as indeclinable in the singular. Lucilius was perhaps 

406 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 
1242-3 

Varro : They think that a further reason why there is no 
analogy is that Lucilius writes — 

They are priced a ten-a^, or perhaps the right 
expression is ' at ten-asses. ' " 

They are wrong because Lucilius ought not to have doubted ; 
for both forms are right. 

1244 

Ills and diseases : 

Paulus : ' Vitiligo ' a white spot on the human body, 
which the Greeks call dA^d? . . . Lucihus — 

" This white spot disgusts me." " It doesn't hurt, 
does it? " said he. 

1245 

Paulus : It is certain that the term cold ' querquera ' 
with shiverings is derived from the Greek Kctp/capa, whence 
also ' career.' Lucilius — 

tossing me about like a feverish ague. 

1246 
Festus : ' Tama ' is a term used when from the toil of travel 
the blood moves down into the legs and makes a swelling. 
Lucilius — 

lest a groin-swelling appear, lest pimples, a lump,^ 
a blister should give pain. 

1247 
Charisius : ' Pedetemptim.' Lucilius — 
safety to come hither step by step.^ 

referring again to the Lex Fannia which allowed the expense 
of ten asses on a dinner. 

^ in medical language, a varicose vein. (Linds., C.Q., 
XX, 103.) The line perhaps belongs to book III and gave a 
reason for not making the journey on foot. Some (Fiske, 
T.A.P., XL, 146) take inguen here as ' memhrum virile.'' 

" The true reading and the meaning are unknown. 

407 



LUCILIUS 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., *S'. II, 3, 41 : ' Primum nam inquiram 
quid sit furerc' Ostendit quid sit furor ut Lucilius. 



1248 

VaiTO, L.L., VII, 103 : Multa ab animalium vocibus tralata 
in homines. . . . Lucilii ... — 

quantum hinnitum at que equitatum. 



1249 

Cicero, ad Alt., XIII, 21, 3 : Nee est melius quicquam quam 
ut Lucilius — 

Sustineas currum ut bonus saepe agitator equosque. 

Cp. id., Acad. Friora, II, 29, 94; Lad., 17, 63. 



1250-2 

Gellius, XVIII, 5, 8 : Lucilius . . . vir adprime linguae 
Latinae sciens, equum equitare dicit his versibus — 

Quis hunc currere ecum nos at que equitare videmus, 
his equitat curritque ; oculis equitare videmus ; 
ergo oculis equitat. 

Cp. Non., 107, 1; Macrob., VI, 9, 11. 

1253 

Festus, 428, 6 : ' Solox ' lana crassa et pecus quod passim 
pascitur non tectum. . . . Lucilius — 

pascali pecore ac montano, hirto atque soloce. 

Cp. Paul., ex Fest., 429, 4. 



^248 quiritatum Mr. 

^253 fj-ih. lib. Ill Mr. pascali Aug. pastali Fesl., 
Paul. 

408 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

Porphyrio, on 'For I will first inquire what it is to be 
mad ' in Horace : Like Lucilius he shows what madness is. 

1248 

References to animals : 

Varro : Many sounds made by animals have been trans- 
ferred to apply to human beings. Of Lucilius we have ... — 

what great neighing and horse-riding." 

1249 

Cicero : And you cannot improve at aU on the advice 
Lucilius gi 



Hold back your chariot and horses as oft a good 
driver does. 

1250-2 

Gellius : LuciUus, foremost in knowledge of the Latin 
tongue, says ' equum cquitare ' *" in these verses — 

\Miat we see this horse run and go ^vith, with that 
he runs and goes. With eyes we see him go ; there- 
fore he goes with eyes. 

1253 

Festus : ' Solox ' is thick (unwrought) wool; and also sheep 
which are pastured at random without cover. . . . Lucilius — 

a pasturing mountain-flock having wool shaggy and 
coarse. 

" This seems to be the meaning here, i.e. a galloping sound, 
' noise of cavalry.' Cf. hnes 1250-2. But equilatus may 
weU be a vocal sound. Some connect it with equire, ' to be 
in heat ' (of mares). 

'' or, uses the term equitare as applied to a horse. The 
quotation illustrates faulty syllogism. 

409 



LUCILIUS 

1254 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 98, 9 K : ' Acceptor ' quoque et 
accipiter '. . , . Lucilius ... — 

exta acceptoris et unguis. 

1255-6 

Consentius, ap. G.L., V, 400, 4 K : Poetae faciunt meta- 
plasmos cum ipsi iam scripturam relinquunt corruptam . . . 
sicut Lucilius — 

ore 
corupto 
dempsit unam litteram per metaplasmum ' r.' 

1257-8 

Charisius, ap. G.L., I, 78, 10 (VII, 206, 26) K : Lucilius 
tamcn et per ununi ' i ' genetivum scribi posse existimat ; 
ait enim — • 

Servandi numeri et versus faciendi 
nos Caeli Numeri numerum ut servemus modumque. 

Numquam enim hoc intulisset, nisi et Caelii et Numeri 
per ii . . . faciendum crederet. 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., 8., I, 1, 101 : ' Quid me igitur suades 
ut vivam Naevius aut sic ut Nomcntanus ? ' Naevius autem 
f uit in tantum parens ut sordidus merito haberetur ut Lucilius 
ait. 

Cp. Hor., S., II, 2, 68. 

1255-6 <inque vicem duro qui me petit>ore Kopv-nroi 
Heraeus, Rh. Mvs., LXX, 41 

1257-8 f.f^ Marx, ad 362, 1294 {trih. lib. XXX) ; Mr. pp. 278-9. 
Servandi . . . faciendi D (I.) eo: ve/. Cf/.; fortasae reiciemla 

Porphyr. : ut Lucilius ait Petschenig. Lucilio auctore 
M haberetur Lucilius aut cdd. 

" either tlie sparrow-hawk or the kestrel. Perhaps some 
magic brew is referred to. 

410 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 
1254 

Charisius : ' Acceptor ' occurs beside ' accipiter ' . . . 
Lucilius — 

the vitals and claws of a hawk." 

1255-6 

Literary matters. Word formations : 

Consentius : The poets make metaplasms (grammatical 
changes) when they actually and purposely leave a spelling 
wrong and unaltered . . . like Lucilius — 

with corupt ^ mouth. 

For he has taken away one letter ' r ' by metaplasm. 

1257-8 

Charisius : Still Lucilius is of opinion that the genitive 
can be WTitten even with one ' i.' For he says — 

The metre must be preserved and our lines must 
be composed so that we preserve the metre and the 
rhythm by writing * Caeli Numeri.' <^ 

For he would never have inserted this remark unless he 
believed that both the genitives ' Caelii ' and Numerii ' 
should really be spelt thus : with ' ii.' 

Porphyrio, on ' Why do you advise me to live a very 
Naevius or like Xomentanus ' ? in Horace. As a matter of 
fact Naevius was stingy to such a degree that he was deservedly 
held to be a mean fellow, as LuciHus says. 

* Heraeus, Rh. Mus., LXX, 41, suggests Kopv-mio (' I 
butt'); cp. Diels, Sitz.-Ber. Berlin, 1922, 57; on the 
other hand cf. Marx, Abh. Sachs., Ak. d. 11'., PhiL-Hist. Kl, 
XXXVII, 33. But in view of Consentius' remarks, this cannot 
be right. 

" i.e. genitive or vocative instead of other cases of 
Numerius which could not fit into a hexameter. Charisius' 
source falsely believed that Lucilius sanctioned here a 
genitive with ii. This genitive began in a later period. 

411 



LUCILIUS 

1259 

Donatus ad Ter., Phorm., I, 2, 3 : (. . . lectum . . .) : 
Absolute ; nam non dicit quid, utrum debitum an argentum 
lectum. Lucilius — 

Lecti omnes ; Atticon hoc est. 



1260 

Gellius, VI, 3, 28 : Recte . . . inquit Tiro hoc vitio dat 
Lucilius poetae Euripidae quod cum Polyphontes rex prop- 
terea se interfecisse fratrem dicerct quod ipse ante de nece 
eius consilium cepisset, Mcropa fratris uxor hisce adeo eum 
verbis eluserit ei yap a' l/neAAev' cLs ai) (f)T]9 Kreiveiv Troais, XPV^ 
KoX a€ fxeXXeiv, (Ls xP^^'^s irapriXvOev. At hoc enim, inquit — 

Plane stultitiae plenum est 

eo consilio atque ea fini faccre velle ahquid — 

uti numquam id facias quod velis. 



1261 

Nonius, 223, 27 : ' Sibilum ' . . . masculino. . . . 
LuciUus — 

saxei et stridor ubi atque rudentum sibihis infit. 

1260 plane e. q. s. constit. W hoc enim trih. Luc. 
Stow., IF. St., Ill, 280 irib. lib. XXIX L, Mr. 

1261 saxa et cdd. saxei ct Ribbeck, lih. Mas., XXIX, 
128 rudentum Ribb, ruentum ]\Ir. (furentum vel ruentum 
id. ed. Non. furentum jyrob. M) atquierunt turn 
Lips at quiverunt .Stow., ]r.*S'^, XX VII, 221 atque erunt 
dum cdd. instat vel infit Lips institis cdd. isti M 
trib. lib. Ill \"arges 

412 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1259 

Literary criticism ? ; comedy : 

Donatus, on ' lectum est ' in Terence : ' Leetum ' used 
without adjunct; for he does not say what is 'lectum,' the 
debt or the money. LucUius^ 

They're all picked mintage — this is Attic coin. 

1260 
Tragedy ; Euripides : 

Gellius : Rightly, says Tiro, does Lucilius impute a blemish 
to the poet Euripides, that when King Polyphontes said he 
had killed his brother because that brother had himself 
before made a plan to slay him, Merope his brother's wife 
parried the King with these very words: — 'if, as you say, 
my husband had in mind to kill you, you also ought to have 
had in mind to kill him in order that that time " might have 
passed by." But you will say (he went on) — 

It is downright full of foolishness 

to have the wish to do anything with that view and to 
that end — 

that you should never do what you want.^ 

1261 

Pacuvius P 

Nonius : ' Sibilum ' ... in the masculine. , . . Lucilius — 

When the whizzing and the hissing of the hawsers 
and the noise of stone begin.*^ 

" during which the brother had murder in his mind. 

'' The attribution of even so much of the passage of 
GelHus to Lucilius is quite conjectural (see Stowasser, W.St., 
Ill, 380). 

' I adopt Ribbeck Rh. Mus., XXIX, 128; Lucilius 
imitates Pacuvius' (see Remuins of Old Latin, II, pp. 296-7) 
' arniamentum stridor . . . rvdentum sibilus.^ 



LUCILIUS 

1262 

Explanat. in Donat., ap. G.L., IV, 542, 12 K : Sal masculini 
generis est. Lucilius — 

Ore saleni expiravit aniarum. 



1263 

Paulus, ex Fest., 449, 1 : ' Sub vitem ' hastas iacere dicitur 
veles cum eas sub vinea raanu sursum mittit. Lucilius — 

ut veles bonus sub vitem qui subicit hastas. 

Cp. Fest., 446, fin. 

1264 

Festus, 250, 26 : ' Petauristas ' Lucilius a petauro appel- 
latos existimare videtur quando ait — 

sicuti mechanici cum alto exiluere petauro. 

1265-6 

Isidorus, Orig., XIX, 7, 2 : ' Marculus ' malleus pusillus. 
Lucilius — 

Et velut in fabrica fervens cum marculus ferrum 
<(mugitu) multo cum magnis ictibus tundit, 

1263 subicit Aug. subsit cd. Fest. submisit Paul. 

(quibus misit Leid. Voss. 37) 

1266 <niugitu> W <tinnitu> M multo cum M 
multorum cdd. magnis <tuditantium> S <incum- 
bentum> Mr. <instantibus> B trih. lib. Ill Vargas 

" either translated direct from Homer, Od., V, 322 arofiaros 
8' €^€TTTvaev aA/M7jv|7TtK-p7jv or taken from a Latin tragedy and 
put back into an hexameter. Lucilius may here parody 
Ennius' Andromeda (Ennius, EemaiTis, I, pp. 256-259). 

'' Here veles, singular, appears to stand collectively for the 
plural velites. 

414 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1262 

Ennius ? 

A commentator on Donatus : ' Sal ' is of the masculine 
gender. Lucilius — 

From his mouth he spat forth bitter brine.'^ 

1263 

Similes. War : 

Paulus : Skirmishers are said to throw their spears ' under 
the vine ' when they thrust them upward by hand under a 
' vinea ' (penthouse) Lucilius — 

like good skirmishers'' who thrust their spears 
under the vine. 

1264 

Acrobatics : 

Festus : Lucilius seems to believe that ' petauristae ' 
(rope-dancers) are so-called from ' petaurum ' since he says — 

just as acrobats when they have jumped off the 
spring-board on high.*^ 

1265-6 
Forging : 

Isidore : ' Marculus ' a little mallet. Lucilius — 
And just as when in a workshop a hammer hits the 

g 



red-hot iron with much bellowing of bisf blows,'^ 



'^ Some think that Lucilius referred here to persons on 
the look-out from some observation-post. Festus' remark 
implies that Lucilius used the word petauristae ; we might 
read 'petauristae yj \j | sicuti mechanici, cum alto e. q. s. 

'^ a word has dropped out; mugitu, which I suggest, may 
be too strong an expression to apply to marculus (a little 
hammer); we can add the fr. to the description of 
Aetna in book III as Varges does, if marculus is here used 
(as I believe) of a large hammer; magnis ictibus suggests 
this. 



LUCILIUS 

1267-8 

Servius (auctus), adi4e/i., XII, 5 : ' Saucius ille.' KaT t^oxhv 
ille leo, id est princeps fcrarum; . . . interdum nobilitatem 
significat . . . aut rem similem designat. Lucilius — 

velut olim 
auceps ille facit clam inproviso insidiisque. 

1269 
Nonius, 72, 7 : ' Algu ' pro algore, . . . Lucilius — 
t nantam t algu atque nigrore t maius f 

1270 
Nonius, 229, 2 : ' Torpor ' generis masculini. Lucilius — 
Tantus conduxerat omnia torpor. 

1271 

Varro, L.L.y V, 63 : Poetae de caelo quod semen igneum 
cecidisse dicunt in mare ac natam e spumis Venerem con- 
iunctione ignis et humoris, quam habent vim, significant esse 
Veneris ; a qua vi natis dicta vita, et illud a Lucilio — 

* Vis ' est * vita ' vides, * vis ' nos facere omnia cogit. 

1272 

Donatus, ad Ter., Hec, III, 4, 26 : Imperite Terentium 
Myconium ' crispum ' dixisse aiunt. . . . Lucilius — 

Myconi calva omnis iuventus. 

^268 clam M cum cd. forlasse rede 

1269 nantam {Lu. \ G2 natam G 1 non tarn Harl. 1) algu 
atque nigrore maius cdd. nautara lun. narcam coni. 
Linds. noctem coni. M raanca Mr. {ed. Nan.) 
mancum INIr. (ed. Liicil.) rigore Gerlach ac frigore coni. 
Linds. manus lun. malam coni. M 

Non., 229 : Lucilius Roth Lucretius cdd. 

1270 concusserat ed. princ. 

416 



UNASSIGNED FRAGMENTS 

1267-8 
Fowling : 

Servius (supplemented), on ' That wounded ' (sc. lion) in 
\'irgil : That, sc. lion, par excellence, that is, the king of beasts. 
. . . now and again the word ' ille ' points to the well-known 
... or it marks a simile." Lucilius — 

as oft your fowler does with stealth, surprise and 
snares. 

1269 
Miscellaneous topics : 

Nonius : ' Algu ' for ' algore ' . . . Lucilius — 
. . . with cold and blackness . . . 

1270 

Nonius : ' Torpor ' is of the masculine gender. Lucilius — 
Such numbness had cramped everything. 

1271 

Yarro : When the poets say that the seed of fire fell from the 
sky into the sea and that Venus was born from the foam by 
a union of fixe and water, the}' indicate that the ' vis ' which 
these elements have is of Venus. ' Vita ' is the name used 
for a quality of the things which are produced from this 
' vis ' ; and there is that passage from Lucilius — 

' Vita ' is ' vis,' — force is life — you see ; it is * vis ' 
which forces on us all our acts. 
1272 

Donatus : They say that it was unlearned on the part of 
Terence to call a Myconian ' curly-haired.' Lucilius has — 



all the young men of Myconos are bald. 



"* As a matter of fact, ille simply marks a simile in Virgil's 
passages, as well as Lucilius'. 

» cf. Pliny, XT, L30; Strabo, X, 487— bald folk sometimes 
called Myconians. 

417 
VOL. III. E E 



WORDS AND PHRASES OF LUCILIUS 
NOT INCLUDED IN THE TEXT OR 
NOTES OF THIS VOLUME 

Frcym Book III : ' Utpote ' (inasmuch as). Julius 
Romanus in Charisius, G.L., I, 223, 21 K. 

From Book VII : ' calx ' (end) ; properly lime or chalk ; 
also the turning point of a race-course, at one time marked 
with chalk ; thus also the conclusion of anything ; cf. below, 
Book XIV. Given by Nonius, 257, 49-50 : ' Calx ' est finis. 
Lucilius Satyrarum lib. Vll : hoc est cum ad . . .' There 
follows a quotation from Virgil, Aen., V, 324 (' calcemque terit 
lam calce Diores ') which has ousted the full quotation of 
Lucilius. We mxiy claim the words hoc est cum ad <calcem> 
for Lucilius, hut only cd. Gen. 84 and cdd. copied from, it have 
hoc est cum ad. 

From Book VIII : ' vinibuae ' (wine-bibbing women). 
Nonius, 81, 4; Nonius shows that ' bua ' (used as a feminine 
noun) is a natural sound made by small children when they 
ask for a drink. 

From Book XIV : * calx ' ((i) heel; (ii) lime or chalk — 
see just above under Book VII). Used by Lucilius in the 
mascuhne gender. Charisius, G.L., I, 92, 31 K. 

Not assigned to any hook : 

* muttonium ' (penis). Glossar., C.G.L., II, 131, where 
the authority says Lucilius means Trpo^aaKavLOv — an emblem 
hung by artisans outside their shops as a mascot against 
witchcraft or the evil eye. Probably from Books XXVI- 

418 



WORDS NOT INCLUDED IN THE TEXT 

XXIX, but authenticity not quite certain {TrpojSacrKavTov. 
X.ovKi()<;, which editors emend), 

' cordipugis versibus ' (in heart-punching hnes). 
Placidus, C.G.L., V, 58, 39, where no author's name is given. 
If Baehrens was right in concluding that the author was 
Lucilius (cf, Paul, and Fest. on ' noctipuga,' given on pp. 
384-5), then this fr. belongs to Books XXVI-XXIX, 

' conque tubernalem ' (fellow- also -tentholder). 
Tmesis for ' contubernalemque,' fellow-tentholder also. Con- 
sentius, G.L., V, 390, 33 K. Cp. Auson., Ep., XVI, 37-8. 

' lactentes ficos ' (milky figs). Caper, G.L., VII, 98, 2 K. 

' gatulUocae ' (walnuts). Glossar., C.G.L., II, 36, 34. 
{KVTvXXioxy, 'nut-shell' Stowasser, Wien. Stud., XXVIII- 
226-7 ; but the gloss, here sa^^s that ' gutulliocae ' means 
nuts.) 

' murexque marinus ' (and pui-ple-mollusc of the sea). 
pseudo-Acro, ad Hor., S., II, 4, 32. 

* viscus aprinum ' (boar's flesh). Charisius, G.L I, 83, 
13 K. 

' <(vinum)> crucium ' (pang-wine). Paulus, from Festus, 
53, 5, where he says " ' Crucium,' so called because ' cruciat ' 
it tortures. Whence Lucilius calls nasty wine ' crucium.' " 

' Campana Capua ' (from Campanian Capua). Por- 
phyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 6, 68. Probably from Lucilius' account 
of his journey in Book III. 

' carissam ' (trickster or bawd ?). Paulus, from Festus, 
44, p. 38, 1. 18 Linds., where he says carissam {ace. masc.) 
means vaf rum. But C.G-'.I/., II, 97, 43 has: carisa/xttvAtcrTr;?, 

TTOpVO^OO-KOS. 

' disertim ' (eloquently). Nonius, 509, 20 : ' Disertim ' 
dicere plane palam LuciLio (lucilio or lucio the cdd.) auctore 
possumus in Vehterna : ' Habui.' ' Recte disertim ! ' Here 
we must read either palam Titinio auctore {after Bentin.) or 
palam LuciLio <et Titinio> auctore with Marx. 

419 
EE 2 



LUCILIUS 

' ravi ' (hoarse men). Festus, 392, 15-6, where all that 
is left of the quotation from Lucilius is * * * t ravi. 

' ponere ' (to cause). Serv. auct., ad Aen., X, 623 

* ponere ' facere, sicut Lucilius Homerum secutus qui ait 

' transennae ' (pieces of lattice-work). Gloss. Vat., 
C.G.L., IV, 186, 43. Doubtful because the cd. has luc (Lucilius 
Goetz). 

' <lacuarque) arcusque '(fretted ceilings, and arches). 
Interpres Verg. Veron. ad Aen., VIII, 25 Lacuar * * * pluribus 

* * * quae n * * * Lucilius * * * arcusque. <Iacuarque> = 
laqucar Baehrens <lacusque> Mr. 

' canalicula ' (little channel). Nonius, 198, 7. 

* camphippi elephantocamelos ' (writhehorses, an 
elephantcaniel). Nonius, 120, 13 (camphippelephanto- 
camelos I. Dousa camphippi et pardocamelos Onions 
camphippi et panthercamelos Mr. hippocampi elefanto camiUos 
cdd.) Lucilius wrote ' camphippi ' because ' hippocampi ' 
would not go into an hexameter. 

' cactus ' (artichoke). Glossar., C.G.L., II, 12, 52 cactum 
[sic Vulcanius; acactum cd.) uKavOa (og KovklXio<; {Xov- 
KLavo<i cd.). This thorny plant would be the Spanish artichoke, 
a variety of Cynara. 

' corolla '^little garland). Isidorus, Oruj., XIX, 30, 1. 

' aquilum ' (swarthy). Glossar., C.G.L., II, 20, 37. 

' <(togae) crebrae papaveratae ' (gowns with the nap 
on, and poppy-whitened). Phny i^.H., VIII, 195, where he 
says that, according to Fenestella, ' togae rasae,' in which the 
nap was cut close for summer-wear, first came into fashion in 
the last years of Augustus' principate ; then : ' crebrae 
papaveratae antiquiorem habent originem iam sub Luciho 
poeta in Torquato notatae ' ; this apparently means that 
togae which had been whitened with a preparation made from 
poppies and had the nap neither worn off nor cut close were 

420 



WORDS NOT INCLUDED IN THE TEXT 

an object of censure or satire in Lucilius' judgment when the 
poet was attacking one Manlius Torquatus, 

' pistrina ' (bakery or pounding-mill) and ' pistrix ' 
(bakeress). Varro, L.L., V, 138. We have had ' pistrina ' 
already in Lucihus (line 556) ; likewise ' pistrix ' (line 1055), 
But Varro says ' in urbe Lucili pistrina et pistrix ' which makes 
it possible that these two words occurred apart from the two 
fragments cited, and in a satire entitled JJrhs, The City. 
' Pistrix ' as a female baker must be distinguished from the 
word given next. 

' pistrices ' (sea beasts; whales or sharks?). C.G.L., V, 
234, 1. This word (in Greek '7rLcrTpi<;, TrpicrTii) appears also 
as ' pristix,' ' pristis,' ' pistris,' In the gloss. Lucilius {thus 
Loewe) for lucius is probable; but cf. Niedermann, Eev. de 
Phil, XLI, 231-3 (' lucius ' = fresh-water pike?). 

' naterum ' (of buttocks) instead of ' natium.' Chari- 
sius, G.L., I, 54, 21 K dixit Lucilius (aZ. Neapol. Caecihus al. 
Colon.) naterum {cd. Colon, naverum cd. Neapol.). Author 
and fragment uncertain. 

' hos vappones ' (these moths). Mar. Plot. = Prob. 
Cath., ap. G.L. IV, 10, 30 ff. K where the text attributes the 
expression to Lucretius. But it is not to be found in 
Lucretius. I. Dousa attributes the words to Lucilius. 

' pergit capulare cadaver ' (the coffined corpse moves 
on). Fulgentius, Exposit. Serm. Antiqu., 23, 118, 14 (Helm), 
who attributes the phrase to Lucilius but goes on to quote 
. . . ' capularis senex ' from the comedy Jlelene of Flaccus 
Tibullus, an author apparently fictitious. Thus the fr. of 
Lucilius also is probably invented. 

* hypereticosque celetes ' (and a service-boat). 
Inscription on a mosaic at Tunis {Musee Alaoui, 166, p. 32; 
Bueeheler, Rhein. Mus., LIX, 1904, 322), which shows a ship 
called there KeXtjre^; also. Cf. Xen,, Hellen., I, 6, 36 
6 v7ry]p€TLKo<i KeXr]<i. The mosaic gives also two undoubted 

421 



LUCILIUS 

lines of Lucilius (see pp. 166-7, 378-9), to whom Valileu 
attributed this fr. also. But the name LuciUus is not mentioned. 

' panaceain iibique salcm ' (salt everywhere an all- 
heal). Servius, ad Aen., XIT, 419, where ' panacea ' is the 
plant all-heal. Servius quotes these words from Lucretius 
to support his idea (a false one) that in Virgil's passage also 
' panacea ' may mean salt. Our extant Lucretius, however, 
uses only ' panaces ' (IV, 124), without the words ' ubique 
salem,' and without any reference to salt. Hence Pius' 
attribution to Lucilius may be right. Marx would correct to 
' panacean.' 

' Luciliades ' (son-o'-Lucilius' house). Explanat. in 
Donat., G.L., IV, 527, 10 ff. K, where ' Meramiades ' and 
' Scipiades ' also are given as examples of this form. We 
have certainly ' Scipiadas ' in Lucilius (see pp. 80, 134), 
and so, if not ' Memmiades ' or Memmiadas,' at least ' Luci- 
liades ' or ' Luciliadas ' may have come in the satires of 
Lucilius, who in them seems to have mentioned himself by 
name several times. The attribution of Luciliades to Lucilius 
is Mueller's. 

Jerome, Ep. ad Chrom. lov. Euseb., I, p. 340 M shows that 
Lucilius said M. Crassus laughed once only in his life, namely 
at the application of some proverb — ' similem habent labra 
lactucam asino carduos comedente.' — ' His Ups hold a lettuce 
like when an ass is devouring thistles.' Cicero, de Fin., V, 92 
(cp. Tusc. Disp., Ill, 31; PUny, N.H., VII, 79) says that 
Crassus was still called ' Agelastus,' ' Unsmiling,' as 
Lucilius said. Restorations of this fr. as quoted by Jerome 
are uncertain. 

Cicero, de Or., I, 72 says Lucilius often used to say (in 
Satires ?) ' Neminera esse in oratorum numero habendum qui 
non sit omnibus iis artibus quae sunt libero dignae perpolitus.' 
— ' No one is to be counted amongst orators who has not been 

422 



WORDS NOT INCLUDED IN THE TEXT 

thoroughly finished in those arts which are worthy of a free 
man.* 

Nonius, 463, 5 : ' Propitios ' et homines placatos dici 
vetustas voluit <(LuciUus lib.^ added hy ed. Aid. tvilh prohability 
XXVII : — ' In bonis porro est viris, si irati seu cui 
propitii I sunt, ut diiitius eadem una maneant in 
sententia.' — ' Further it is in the nature of honour- 
able men, whether they are angry or on good 
terms with someone, to remain for a long long time 
in the grip of one and the same feeling.' 

Porphyrio on Hor., Ep., II, 2, 94-5 shows that Lucilius 
sometimes divided a word between two lines. We have one 
example of this in lines 78-9. 

There are other expressions, even whole lines of Latin, 
attributed to Lucilius by modern scholars on slender or no 
evidence. They will be found in Marx, pp. 92-5, and Terzaghi, 
pp. 74-6. 



423 



XII TABULAE 

SIVE 

LEX XII TABULARUM 

Tabula I 

1 

Porphyrio, ad Hor., S., I, 9, 76 : ' Et licet antestari ? ' 
Adversarius molesti illius Horatium consulit, an permittat se 
antestari, iniecta manu extractums ad praetorem, quod 
vadimonio non paruerit. De hoc . . . Lege XII Tabularum 
his verbis cautum est — 

1 Si in ius vocat, <ito). Ni it, antestamino. 
Igitur em capito. 

* Antestari ' est ergo ' antetestari,' scilicet ante quam 
manuni iniciat. 

Cp. Cic, de Leg., II, 4, 9; Gell., XX, 1, 25; Ad Herenn., 
II, 13, 19; Paul., ex F., 54, 19. 

^ ius vocationi tantcstaminigitur en cd., corr. Godefroy 
(J.) <ito> add. Heindorf antestator Carrio 

" Cicero, de Leg., II, 49 shows that the following rules stood 
at the beginning of the code. Therefore they belong with 
certainty to Table I. Note in the first three tables the 
detail in which the code dealt with procedure. 

^ That is, into the presence of a magistrate (at the time 
of the Tables a consul) on one of the dies fasti (or on one of the 
dies comitiales if no comitia were being held) by way of 
preliminary to a decisive trial before a index agreed on by 
both parties. The plaintiff summoned defendant not by writ 
of summons, nor through any officer of the law, but by word 

.424 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

OR 

THE LAW OF THE TWELVE TABLES 

Table I 
Preliminai'ies to a trial. Rules for a trial 

1 

Rights and duties of plaint ijf : 

PorphjTio, on ' And may I call you to witness ? ' in Horace : 
The adversary of the bore in this satire asks Horace if he will 
allow him to call the poet to witness, his intention being to 
lay hands on the bore and haul him away to the praetor's court 
on the ground that he has not answered a recognisance. On 
this matter . . . there was a provision made in the Laiv of 
the Twelve Tables in the following words : — " 

1 If plaintiiF summons defendant to com't,^ he shall 
go. If he does not go, plaintiff shall call 
witness thereto. Then only shall he take 
defendant by force. 

Thus ' antestari ' <^ means ' ante-testari ' ; that is to say, ' ante 
quam manus iniciat,' before he lays hand on him. 

of mouth, wherever he might find him ; there were no police 
yet in Rome. For dies fasti, see below, pp. 505-6. 

'^ This word perhaps means ' to call as witness to or 
in front of something.' The plaintiff asked licet antestari? 
and at the same time touched the witness' ear. Some scholars 
refer this enactment to ' keeping house ' in order to avoid 
vocatio in ins, and connect it with the last fr. of Table 11, 
pp. 436-7. 

425 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

2-3 

Festus, 450, fin. : ' Stniere ' antiqui dicebant pro adiccre, 
augere ... at in XII quod est — 

2 Si calvitur pedemve striiit, manum endo iacito ; 

alii putant significare retrorsus ire. 

Gellius, XX, 1, 24: Cur tibi esse visa est inhumana lex 
omnium mea quidem sententia huraanissima, quae iumentum 
dari iubet aegro aut seni in ius vocato ? Verba sunt haec de 
lege ' si in ius vocat ' — 

^ Si morbus aevitasvc vitium escit, [qui in ius 
vocabit] iumentum dato ; si nolet, arceram ne 
sternito. 

Cp. Fest., 258, 29; Non., 7, 2; Dig., L, 16, 233 pr.; GelL, 
XX, 1, 11; Varr., L.L., V, 140; Non., 55, 3; Paul., ex F., 
54, s.v. ' escit.' 



Gellius, XVI, 10, 5 : Quintus Ennius verbum hoc ex XII 
Tabulis vestris accepit, in quibus si recte commemini ita 
scriptum est — 

^ Adsiduo vindex adsiduus esto. Proletario [iam 
civi cui] quis volet vindex esto. 

Cp. Gai., Dig., II, 4, 22, 1 ; Dig., L, 16, 234, 1 ; Cic, Top., 
11,10; Non., 67, 18; 155,19; Paul., ex F., 7, 11. 

3 qm\n\\xs,YOQa.hit seel ad. ^cYioeW, recte utvidetur Si nolet 
seclud 13 real 

^ ia,m civi om.cdd. GelL famil. alt. cui cieZ. Schoell cui 
quivis Scioppius quiqui Rittershus 

*» The idea was perhaps like our ' make tracks.' Anyhow 
the meaning is ' to try to run away ' (as it were ' heap up 
footsteps,' from strues, heap). 

* Elsewhere iumentmn is a yoked beast of draught or 
burden. But note that GeUius explains the word here as a 

426 



TABLE I 

2-3 

Festus : * Struere,' a terra used by archaic writers for ' to add 
to,' ' to increase ' . . . But in the expression used in the 
Twelve — 

2 If defendant shirks or takes to heels, plaintiff 
shall lay hand on him ; 

some think ' struere " pedem ' means ' to go back,' move 
back. 

Gellius : Why did you think that the law which ordains 
that a sick or an old man, when he is summoned to court, be 
granted a team * — a law which, in my opinion at any rate, is 
the humanest of all — is an inhuman one ? Here are the exact 
words, taken from the enactment which begins ' If plaintiff 
summons defendant to court ' — 

^ If disease or age shall be impediment, he [who 
shall summon defendant to com't] shall grant 
him team ; he should not spread with cushions 
covered carriage if he shall not so desire. 

4 

Bight of defendant to a representative : 

Gellius : Quintus Ennius got this word ' proletarius ' from 
your Tioelve Tables, in which, if I remember rightly, occurs 
the following passage — 

* For landoAVTier,*' landowner shall be protector ^^ ; 
but for proletarian person let any one who shall 
be willing be protector. 

vectabulum, ' carrier ' or ' conveyance,' as it were perhaps 
' horse and cart.' 

" assiduus means a wealthy freeholder {ad -j- sed ' constant 
settler '), while proletarius is, from the city's point of view, 
merely a breeder of proles, progeny, children; a *studman.' 

^ The vindex v/as a voluntary ' assertor of rights ' — here 
a representative who could appear, in place of defendant, 
in iure at the preUminary trial before a magistrate (see above, 
p. 424). Some put this law in Table III. Cp. pp. 436 flf. 

427 



THE TWELVE TABLES 
5 

Fcstus, 470, 18: <*Sanatcs' quasi sana>ti appellat<i> 
... in XII— 

^ Nex<(i mancipique clim p. R. idem) forcti sanati- 
{que ius esto). 

Festus, 524, 14 : In XII cautum est ut idem iuris esset 
sanatibns quod forctibus, id est bonis et qui numquam 
dcfecerant a populo Romano. 

Cp. GdL, XVI, 10, 8; Paul., ex F., 59, 24; cf. 73, 8. 

6-9 

auctor, ad Herenn., II, 13, 20 : Pacta sunt quae legibus 
observanda sunt, hoc modo — 

^ Rem ubi pacunt, orato. "^ Ni pacunt, in comitio 
aut in foro ante meridiem causam coniciunto. 



Schoell nexum mancipiumque forcti {vel 

forctis) sanatisque idem esto coni. Muirhead nexi solutive 
ac forti 0. Mr. nexi mancipique forti sanatique idem ius 
esto Huschke nexo mancipatoque ac forti sanatique idem 

iuris esto Hofifmann. Vide Briins, pars poster., Fest. 35. 

^ patTunt orato. Ni pagunt, in comitio Bosius pangunt 
aut pagunt (paciscuntur cdd. Par.) oratione pangunt {aut 
pagunt) in comitio vel sim. cdd. ad llcrenn. pagunt orationi 
p. vd sim. cdd. Prise. pacunt scribend. demonstrat Scaur. 
rei Rutgers ratom esto T ni ita pagunt Quintil. 

' coniciunto S conscito Huschke coniciunt aut 

conitiunt cdd. Gell. XVII cuicito, conicito, conitito vel 
sim. cdd. ad Herenn. pro in comitio aut in foro poncre 
vult in iure Nikolsky 

" cf. J. Muirhead, Hist, hitrod. to the Private Lata of Rome, 
3rd ed., 102. This restoration of the enactment is probable. 
It laid down, apparently, that Italian aUies who had revolted 
from Rome but returned to allegiance should have the same 
rights, in making contracts, as those who had not rebelled 
at all. Nexum is here apjjarently any legal obligation ; for a 
special meaning (not as here ?) see below, pp. 450-7. Mancijt- 
ium was formal or symbolical conveyance (not necessarily, in 

428' 



TABLE I 

5 

Rights of Rome's Italian allies : 

Festus : ' Sanates ' is a term which was applied to persons 
in the sense of ' sanati ' ... in the Tivelve — 

^ There shall be same right, for staunch person 
and for person restored to allegiance, of bond 
and conveyance with the Roman people." 

Festus : In the Tivelve there was provision made that the same 
rights shall hold good for the ' sanates ' as for the ' forctes,' 
that is for those who were loyal and who had never revolted 
from the Roman people. 

6-9 

// no agreement is reached, trial must follow : 

The author of To Herennius : There are ' pacta ' which must 
be executed according to laws, for example — 

When parties compromise the matter, official ^ 
shall annomice it. 'If they do not com- 
promise, they shall state outline of case in 
Meeting-Place or Market before noon. 

later times, by sale-and-purchase, though in the time of the 
Tables the ceremony was apparently confined to sale and 
purchase) by viancipatio, thus : iji the presence of 5 adult 
Roman citizens the transferee, grasping the thing being con- 
veyed, or a piece of it, asserted his claim, and struck with a 
lump of bronze or copper {aes, raudusculum) a copper scales 
{libra) held by a scales-balancer or libri'pens, and gave the 
copper to transferor to represent the price. Thus the con- 
veyance was one of the transactions done j^er aes et libram, by 
copper and scales. See also pp. 514-5. 

* a index (not necessarily on one of the dies fasti or comitiales) 
.agreed on by the parties at the preliminary trial. But see 
p. 431, n. b. If the cause was complicated, with apparent 
rights and wrongs on both sides, there might be appointed one 
or more arbitri or umpires, who had wider discretion than a 
index or judge. On causae coniectio or collectio before judge or 
arbiter, cf. Gains, Inst., IV, 15. Some, translating Rem ubi 
pacunt. . , . ' When parties have contract on the matter, 

429 



THE TWEL\T. TABLES 

Gellius, XVII, 2, 10 : ' Sole occaso ' non tarn insuavi vetu- 
state est, si quis aureni habeat non sordidam nee proculcatam. 
In XII autem Tabulis verbum hoc ita scriptum est : ' Ante 
meridiem causam coniciunto.' — 

Com peroranto ambo praesentes. ® Post meri- 
diem praesenti litem addicito. ^ Si ambo 
praesentes, sol occasus suprema tempestas 
esto. 

Cp. Varr., L.L., VII, 5 ; VII, 51 ; Priscian., ap. G.L., II, 524, 
1 K; Gell., XVII, 2, 10; Quintil., I, 6, 11. al. Vide Bruns. 

10 

Gellius, XVI, 10, 6 : Petinius . . . ne Annalem nunc Q. 
Enni, sed XII Tabulas legi arbitrere et quid sit in ea Lege 
' proletarius civis ' interpretere. " Kgo vero " inquit ille 
'dicere atque interpretari deberem si ius Faunorum et 
Aboriginum didicissem. Sed enim cum ' proletarii ' et ' ad- 
sidui ' et ' sanates,' et — 

10 vades 

et— 

siibvades, 

' com peroranto vel coram peroranto Schoell comque 

Buecheler turn Mommsen cum perorant cdd. {recte ?) 

quam perorant Cosman 

^ praesenti sedud. Raevard. 

* si ambo praesentes sedud. S sol cdd. Gell., Hosius 
(solis Par. 8664) soils rell. testes 

each party shall simply plead . . .,' hold that these two 
enactments mean that where there exists a written contract 
concerning a thing now in dispute, no causae coniectio is 
required before the case proper is tried. 

" sc. as a separate proceeding after the causae coniectio 

^ that is, if one party fails to appear until the afternoon, he 

shall lose his case by defiiult. At this early date sunrise, noon 

and sunset were the only divisions of the astronomical day ; 

cp. Pliny quoted below, pp. 512-13. Note that judges or 



TABLE I 

Gellius : ' Occasus,' as a past participle with ' sol,' shows 
archaism not so very unpleasant to any one whose ear may not 
be poor or commonplace. Thus in the Twelve Tables this 
expression is used as follows : — ' They shall state outline of 
case before noon.' — 

They shall " plead it out together in person. 
^ After noon, judge shall adjudge case to party 
present.^ ^ If both be present, sun set shall 
be the time-limit (of proceedings). 

10 

Provision of sureties for appearance : 

GeUius : We beg you to believe that we are reading at the 
moment not a book of Quintus Ennius' Annals but the Twelve 
Tables ; and to explain the meaning of ' proletarius civis ' in 
that Law. " For my part " said he " it certainly would be my 
duty to interpret and explain this point if I had learnt the 
jurisprudence of your Fauni and Aborigines." But indeed 
since the terms ^ ' proletarii ' and ' adsidui ' and ' sanates,' 
and ' vades ' and ' subvades,' that is — 

^^ sureties 
and — 

subsureties,^ 

arbiters could only declare, not enforce, what was right. 
If plaintiff obtained judgment in his favour, but failed to get 
satisfaction from defendant, he himself had to institute 
further proceedings by mamis iniectio under supervision of the 
magistrate, not of the judge, after apparently an interval of 
30 days — see Table III, 1-2. Some think litetn addicito means 
* let praetor grant action before index.'' If so, laws 6-9 refer to 
proceedings before a praetor. 

<^ that is, of Faunus the mythical father of King Latinus ; 
of Fauni, sylvan deities; and of the early inhabitants of 
Latium and Rome. 

'^ on these, see above, pp. 426-9. 

^ that is, subsureties on behalf of the sureties, sc. for appear- 
ance in court. 

431 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

et ' viginti quinque asses ' et ' taliones ' furtoniraque quaestio 
cum ' lance et licio ' evanuerint, omnisque ilia XII Tabularum 
antiquitas nisi in legis actionibus centumviralium causanim 
lege Aebutia lata consopita sit, studium scientiamque ego 
praestare debeo iuris et legum vocumque earum qnibus 
utimur." 



Tabula II 

1 

Gains, Inst., IV, 13-14 : Sacramenti actio generalis 
erat; de quibus enim rebus ut alitcr ageretur lege cautum 
non erat de his sacramento agebatur . . . (14) Poena 
autem sacramenti aut quingenaria erat aut quinquagenaria. 
Nam de rebus mille aeris plurisve quingentis assibus, 
de niinoris vero quinquaginta assibus sacramento 
contendebatur ; nam ita Lege XII Tabularum cautum erat. 
Sed si de liber tate hominis controversia erat, etsi 
pretiosissimus homo esset, tamen ut quinquaginta assibus 

" on these, see pp. 476-7, 482-7. 

* The 100 judges were in fact a bench of 105 chosen annually 
for civil suits; the lex Aebutia was a law which was passed 
probably about 150 B.C. 

" The oldest and normal procedure in civil cases, where 
plaintiff seeks by an actio to enforce a right. The sacramentum 
was a sum (of goods, later of money) deposited (later on, 
promised with security) as a kind of stake by both parties and 
forfeited to the State by the loser probably because he was 
deemed to have broken some oath [sacramentum, perhaps 
affirming the justice of his cause) by committing apparent 
perjury. Muirhead, 166 ff, ; Strachan-Davidson, Problems oj 
the Roman Criminal Laiv, I, ])p. 44 ff. The Tables regulated, 
but probably did not create this actio. There were four other 
normal methods of instituting actio, not necessarily by process 
at law : of these four, 77ianus iniectio and pignoris capio, 
which were really methods of execution, certainly existed at 
the time of the Tables (see pp. 426, 436, 506) ; iudicis arbitrive 
postulalin may have been instituted later (but see Table 
VII, 8a-b, pp. 470-1), while condictio certainly was later. 

432 



TABLE II 

' 25 as-pieces ' ' retaliations ' and ' investigation with platter 
and loincloth ' "* have disappeared, and all that archaic lore 
of the Twelve Tables was, save in procedure of law-suits before 
the Bench of One Hundred Judges, put to sleep by the passing 
of the Aebutian law,* the interest and knowledge which it is 
ryiy duty to show must be concerned only with the juris- 
prudence and laws and such phraseology of lawsuits as we use 
now." 

Table II 
Trial; further eiiactmenis thereon 

1 

Actio ' per sacramentum ' or ' legis actio sacramento ' {in 
presence of a magistrate, then of a index — pp. 424: ff.) : 

Gains : Action ' under solemn deposit ' '^ was the general 
form of action ; for legal procedure, on all matters in which 
any other method of procedure had not been provided by law, 
was conducted ' under solemn deposit ' . . . And the penal 
sum in a suit under solemn depost was either five hundred 
pieces or fifty pieces; that is to say, five hundred as- 
pieces was the sum when the object of dispute under 
solemn deposit was valued at one thousand in bronze 
or more, but fifty pieces when less. For such is the 
purport of a provision ^ which had been made in the Laiv of 
the Tivelve Tables. But where the controversy concerned 
the hberty of a human being, a provision of the same 
Law, even though the slave might be very highly valued, 
nevertheless ordained that fifty pieces be the solemn 
deposit under which the dispute should be under- 



^ The Tables substituted as-pieces for the same number of 
pounds weight of raw metal; these latter had themselves, 
only a few years before, by a Lex Aternia (Tarpeia) of 454 B.C., 
been made a substitute for a sum of live beasts, 5 bullocks 
being valued by that law at 500 lbs., 5 sheep at 50 lbs. of copper 
or bronze. Whether the as was as yet stamped coin is uncertain. 

433 
VOL. III. F F 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

Sacramento contenderetur eadem Lege cautum est favore 
scilicet libertatis, ne onerarentur adsertores. 



Gellius, XX, 1, 27 : Morbum vehementiorem vim graviter 
nocendi haljentem leguni istarum scriptorcs alio in loco non 
per se morbum, sed ' morburn sonticum ' appellant. 

Cicero, de Off., I, 12, 37 : ' Hostis ' . . . apud maiores 
nostros is dicebatur quern nunc peregrinum dicimus. Indi- 
cant XII Tabulae ut — 

2 <[ Morbus sonticus) aut status dies cum hoste. 

Festus, 372, 13 : ' Reus ' ... in secunda tabula secunda 
lege . . .— 

<Si) quid horum fuat vitium iudici arbitrove 
reove, eo dies diffensus esto. 

Cp. Fest., 410, 24; 458,12; Ulp., D?(7.,II, 11, 2, 3; XLII, 
1, 60; al. 



Festus, 292, 28 : ' Portum ' in XII pro domo positum omnes 
fere consentiunt — 



2 < morbus sonticus> add. ex Gell., XX, 1 ; Fest., 410, 24. 
siquid horum fuat S quid horum fuit cd. vitium 
Cuiacius unum cd. dies T die cd. diffensus cd. 
difhssus Momms. dies Cuiac. die cd. Farn. L. XVII 

Fest., 372 : seclud. secunda lege Schoell 



" This is the original sense of assertor; the word was also 
used of any advocate ; and see above, p, 427. 

^ This and appointment made for trial of some matter with 
a foreigner (as indicated by Cicero who is quoted next) were 
two of the excuses which were accepted for non-appearance in 
court. 

434 



TABLE II 

taken ; and this for the sake of showing partiality towards 
liberty, so that the assertors of freedom " should not be over- 
burdened by the magnitude of their duty. 

2 

Conditions for postponing proceedings : 

Gellius : A more violent illness,^ which is powerful enough 
to do serious harm is, by the writers of the laws mentioned 
above, called in another passage not simply ' disease ' but 
' serious disease.' 

Cicero : ' Hostis . . . was, amongst our ancestors, the term 
applied to the person whom we now call ' peregrinus.' This 
is shown by the Twelve Tables, thus — 

2 <(Serious disease) or else day appointed ^ with 
stranger. 

Festus : ' Reus ' ... in the second Table, second law . . . — 

If any of these be impediment for judge, 
referee, or party ,'^ on that account day of 
trial shall be broken ofF.^ 



Provision of evidence : 

Festus : ' Portus ' (entrance, doorway) is used in the Twelve 
for house, according to the general agreement of nearly all 
experts — 



"= That is, in a matter of law before a commission of 
recuperatores. For these see below, p. 509. 

^ For index (judge) and arbiter (referee or umpire, not 
* witness ') see above, pp. 424, 429. The arbitri may have been 
actually first instituted by the Tables. Reus is here either of 
the contending parties. Quid hor urn fait in Festus' text may 
be right; if so, quid = quidquid. 

* or ' deferred.' 

435 
FF 2 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

^ Ciii testimonium defuerit, is tertiis diebus ob 

portum obvagulatum ito. 
Cp. Test., 570, 12. 

Tabula III 

1-6 

Gellius, XX, 1, 42 : Confessi igitur aeris ac debiti iudicatis 
triginta dies sunt dati conquirendae pecuniae causa, quam 
dissolverent, eosque dies decemviri ' iustos ' appellaverunt, 
velut quoddam iustitium, id est iuris inter eos quasi inter- 
stitionem quandam et cessationem, quibus nihil cum his agi 
iure posset. Post deinde, nisi dissolverant, ad [praetorem] 
vocabantur et ab eo, quibus erant iudicati, addicebantur, 
nefvo quoque aut compedibus vinciebantur. Sic enim sunt, 
opinor, verba Legis — 

1 Aeris confessi rebusque iure iudicatis XXX dies 
iusti sunto. ^ Post deinde manus iniectio esto. 

rebusque iure seel. Schoell reis Conti reobus Nikolsky 

" that is, after the summons ; or perhaps it is on ' every 
other day,' according to the Roman way of counting; or ' on 
three market-days.' Every eighth day was a market-day. 
This enactment may refer to ' latitation ' or keeping house in 
order to avoid a summons (see p. 425). 

^ This means doubtless that the person requiring evidence 
must proclaim his need by shouting certain legal words or 
calls at witness' house. 

<^ who drew up the code of the Twelve Tables in 451 B.C. 

^ In the time of the Twelve Tables the consul's court, not 
the later praetor's, unless in the Tables (cf. Table XII, 3) the 
consul was called by his original but soon altered name 
praitor = praetor. 

*" This translation retains rebusque iure and takes rebus . . . 
iudicatis as dative, and aeris confessi as genitive, connected 
with dies : "Of debt acknowledged and for matters judged 
in legal process. ..." It seems reasonable to take the 
delay of thirty days as applying, by the laws of the Tables, to 
all kinds of litigants who had been found liable for something, 
and that in this enactment the Tables apply the rule to the 
particular circumstances of debtors. Thus the thirty days' 



TABLE III 

3 Whoever is in need of evidence, he shall go on 
every third " day to waul ^ out before witness' 
doorway. 

Table III 
Debt 

1-6 
Rights of creditors : 

Gellius : Those who have been judged liable for an acknow- 
ledged and unpaid debt were granted thirty days in which to 
find the money for discharging the obligation ; and these days 
the Board of Ten '^ called ' iusti,' legitimate, as perhaps you 
might say a kind of ' iustitium ' (vacation in legal activity) ; 
that is, a certam interval and cessation in judicial proceedings 
between parties; during those daj's no legal action could be 
taken amongst any of them. Then, after the limit, if the 
debtors had not discharged the debt, they were summoned to 
the [praetor's] '^ court and by him were made over to the 
persons to whom they were condemned to be adjudged, and 
they were bound in stocks or fetters. For this, I think, is 
the meaning of the words of the Law — 

1 WTien debt has been acknowledged, or judgment 
about matter has been pronounced in court,*^ 
30 days must be the legitimate time of grace. 
2 After that, then arrest of debtor may be 
made by laying on hands./ Bring him into 

grace are to date from the time when debtor or any other kind 
of defendant was dealt with legally in civic suit, when debtor 
or other defendant may have either confessed his debt or 
other fault, in a magistrates' court, whereupon no trial before 
a index was necessary, or been found later by the index to be 
liable for his fault. But some scholars omit rebusque iure 
because Gellius (see above) clearly takes confessi aeris iudicati 
as ' persons judged liable for acknowledged debt.' Even if 
this view is right, it does not disprove the probabihty that the 
thirty days applied to various kinds of cases. For proceedings 
in iure and apud iudicem, see above, pp. 424 fE., 431. 

f The position of the debtor was now one of an adiudicatus. 

437 



THE TW^EL\TE TABLES 

111 ins ducito. ^ Ni iudicatum facit, aut quis 
endo eo in iure vindicit, secum ducito. Vincito 
aut nervo aut compedibus. XV pondo ne 
niinore, aut si volet maioref vincito. * Si volet 
suo vivito. Ni sue vivit [qui eum vinctum 
habebit] libras farris endo dies dato; si volet, 
plus dato. 

* Erat autem ins interea paciscendi, ac nisi pacti forent 
habebantur in vinculis dies sexaginta. Inter eos dies 
trinis nundinis continuis ad [praetorem] in comitium 
producebantur, quantaeque pecuniae iudicati essent 
praedicabatur. Tertiis autem nundinis capite poenas 
dabant aut trans Tiberim peregre venum ibant. Sed 
earn capitis poenam sanciendae . . . fidei gratia horrificam 
atrocitatis ostentu novisque terroribus metuendam reddidc- 
runt. Nam si plures forent quibus reus esset iudicatus, secare, 
si vellent, atque partiri corpus addicti sibi hominis permiserunt. 
Et quidcm ipsa verba Legis dicam, ne existimes invidiam me 
istam forte formidare — 



3 legendum fortasse endo eom {vel im vel em) iure in 
iure secludend. putat Momms. XV cdd. CL Voigt 
maiore aut si volet minore cd. Cuiacii, Schoell scclud. 
aut si volet minore Breal, Journ. des Sav., 1902, 607 

* qui eum vinctum hebebit seclud. Schoell farris endo 

Gronov ferri e. Christ fer(r)iendo cdd. 



" or perhaps rather ' protector ' or ' claimant ' who might 
dispute the validity of the judgment or confession about the 
debt, or of the manus inieclio based on the judgment or 
confession. Cf. pp. 427, 434. Endo eo may mean ' on the 
spot.' 

438 



TABLE III 

court. ^ If he does not satisfy the judgment, 
or no one in court offers himself as surety <^ on 
his behalf, creditor may take defaulter with 
him. He may bind him either in stocks or 
in fetters ; he may bind him with weight not 
less ^ than 15 pounds, or with more if he shall 
so desire. * Debtor if he shall wish may live 
on his own. If he does not live on his own, 
person [who shall hold him in bonds] shall give 
him one pound of grits for each day. He may 
give more if he shall so desire. 

^ ]\Ioreover there was meanwhile the right of compromising, 
and unless they made a compromise debtors were 
held in bonds for sixty days. During that time they 
were brought before the [praetor's] court in the 
Meeting-Place on three successive market-days,'' 
and the amount for which they were judged liable 
was announcer ; and on the third market-day they 
suffered capital punishment or were deUvered up 
for sale abroad, across the Tiber. But it was in 
order to make good faith sacred . . . that they made that 
capital punishment dreadful by a display of cruelty and 
fearful by unheard of terrors. For in cases where there were 
several creditors to whom the debtor had been adjudged, 
the Board allowed them the privilege of cutting up in pieces 
and sharing out the body — the body of a man — of him who had 
been made over to them ; and listen, I will quote the actual 
words of the Law, lest you believe that maybe I shrink from 
their odium — 

^ Possibly however mmore and viaiore should be inter- 
changed. 

'^ Presumably the last three market days during the period 
of sixty days, and certainly at the consul's not the ])raetor's 
court (cf. p. 436 above). Market-days were eight days 
apart. 

439 



THE TW^ELVE TABLES 

^ Tertiis nundinis partis sccanto. Si plus minusve 
secuerunt, se fraude esto. 

Cp. G(ii.,Inst., IV, 21 ; III, 78; Dig., XLII, 1, 4, 5; L, 16, 
234, 2; GeU., XX, 1, 19; XV, 13, 11; Quintil., Ill, C, 84; 
Tertull., ApoL, 4; Dio Cass., fr. 12. 



Cicero, de Off., I, 12, 37 : ' Hostis ' . . . apud maiores 
nostros is dicebatur quern nunc peregrinum dicimus. Indicant 
XII Tabulae . . . — 

" Adversus hostem aeterna auctoritas <(esto). 



Tabula IV 
1 

Cicero, de Leg., Ill, 8, 19: Cito necatus tamquam ex XII 
Tabulis insignis ad deformitatem puer. 

2 

Ulpianus, Til., 10, 1 : Liberi parentum potestate liberantur 
emancipatione, id est si posteaquam mancipati fuerint manu- 

^ secunto Schulin ' esto Schoell 

" The expression partes secanto is variously explained : 
' let them divide debtor's functions or capabilities ' (Taylor) ; 
' claim shares {secare = sequi) in his jiroperty ' (Nettleship); 
' divide price obtained for him ' (IMuirhead) ; ' divide his family 
and goods' (Voigt); 'announce (to magistrate; secunto 
from secere) their shares ' (SchuUn). The old Roman writers 
took it to mean ' cut up debtor's body.' The division may 
well have been not of the debtor's person but of his pro])erty ; 
or rather the enactment may have laid down division of 
debtor's body, while custom ordained division of his estate. 
For the problems, cf. .Muirhead, 143 If., 182 AT., 403-5. Note 
that the 2'ables still looked on debt as a delict. For delicts, 
see Table VIII, pp. 474 ff. se = sine. 

440 



TABLE IV 

^ On third market-day creditors shall cut pieces." 
Should they have cut more or less than their 
due, it shall be with impunity. 

7 

' Usucapio ' by foreigner not allowed : 

Cicero : ' Hostis ' . . . was, amongst our ancestors, the term 
applied to the person whom we now call ' peregrinus.' This 
is shown by the Twelve Tables ... — 

■^ Against stranger, title of ownership shall hold 
good for ever.^ 

Table IV 
Rights of Fathers 

1 
Destruction of deformed infants : 

Cicero : Quickly killed, as the Twelve Tables ordain that a 
dreadfully deformed child shall be kUled. 

2 

Emancipation of children from fafher\s ' pofesfas ' ; 

Ulpian : Descendants are freed from the authority of ascen- 
dants by ' emancipation,' " that is, if after they have been 
' mancipati,' ' transferred as property,' they have been 



^ This apparently means that a foreigner in Roman territory 
can never obtain rights over any property simply by iisticapio 
or long possession thereof; but the meaning of auctoritas 
here is disputed. At any rate iisucapio (sec p. 460) was 
pecuhar to Roman citizens. For various views, see authorities 
in Jolowicz, Historical Introduction to the Study of Roman Laic, 
149, n. 2. Cp. Table VI, 3. 

* On mancipatio see pp. 428-9. 

441 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

missi sint. Sed filius quidem ter raancipatus ter manumissus 
sui iuris fit. Id enim Lex XII Tabulaium iubet his verbis — 

- Si pater filium ter venumduit, filius a patrc liber 
esto. 

Cp. Ga,i., Itist., I, 132; IV, 79; Dionya.lialic., Antiqu., II, 
27 (eV Tjj TCTdprr) twv Aeyo/ieVcuv AcuScKa AcXtoju). 



Cicero, Philipp., II, 28, 69 : Illam mimam suas res sibi 
habere iussit, ex XII Tabulis, claves ademit exegit. Quam 
porro spcetatus civis, quam probatus, cuius ex omni vita nihil 
est honestius quam quod cum mima fecit divortium ! 

Cp. Gai., Dig., XLVIII, 5, 44 (43). 

4 

Gellius, III, 16, 12 : Decemviri {scripserunt) in decern 
mensibus gigni hominem, non in undecimo. 

Ulpianus, ap. Dig., XXXWII, 16, 3, 9, 11 : Ex Lege XII 
Tabularum ad legitimam hereditatem is qui in utero 
fuit admittitur, si fuerit editus . . . Post decern menses 
mortis natus non admittetur ad legitimam heredi- 
tatem. 

2 d(uit?) a patre filius liber Gains davit Ulp. duuit, 
Cuiacius venundal)it T 

<» Originally a father could sell his son into slavery; and 
if the buyer freed the son, the son came into his father's 
potestas again. The full implications of this enactment are 
not known, but here apparently we have an old formula 
surviving in a sham trijjle-sale whereby a son was euuincipatus 
or freed from his father's potestas. That this enactment was 
in the fourth Table we learn from Dionys. Hal., Antiqu., II, 27. 

'' The forms of words for a repiulinm (compulsory divorce 
of either party by the other) included tuas res tibi habeto or 
luas res tibi agito. See next note. 

442 



TABLE IV 

manumitted. But a son stands in his own right only when 
he has been thrice transferred and thrice manumitted. For 
that is what the Law of the Twelve Tables ordains in the 
following terms — 

2 If ftither thrice surrender son for sale,'^ son shall 
be free from father. 



RejJudiation of wife : 

Cicero : He has given orders for that actress of his to * mind 
her own affairs,' ^ and, under the statutes of the Twelve 
Tables, he has taken away her keys ^ and turned her out. 
What a worthy and excellent citizen in the eyes of posterity ! 
The most repectable thing he did in all his Ufe was to divorce 
an actress ! ^ 

4 

Children born in adultery : 

Gellius : The Board of Ten recorded « that the birth of a 
human being be held to occur within ten months, 
not in the eleventh. 

Ulpian : By the Laiv of the Twelve Tables a child who has 
been in the womb is admitted into a legal inheritance 
if he has been born . . . f K child born after ten months 
since the father's death will not be admitted into a 
legal inheritance. 

« This together with tuas res tibi haheto or agito constituted 
repudium. 

<* Strictly speaking divortium was separation by consent, 
and therefore different from repudium or compulsory divorce 
by either party. This law probably referred to plebeian 
marriages — Muirhead, 107. 

* in an enactment concerning disputed rights of posthumous 
children — see the next quotation. 

f The following words, Hke Gellius' above, may be an 
interpretation, not a paraphrase, of actual words of the code. 

443 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

Tabula V 

Snccessiofi 

A\'itli regard to Roman wills and guardianship, the following 
points should here be noted, (i) At one time a father had no 
power over the disposal of his property after death ; it passed 
to those who had been in his patria pofestas; all the children 
had equal rights; the grandchildren, if their father was dead, 
counted as testator's children. In the earliest times all these 
inheritors held the propert}^ in common, being called consortes, 
and they were testator's sui hereiles (' his own heirs ' ; ' family 
heirs ' ; ' self-successors ' — a situs here-';, mention of whom was 
necessary in a legal will, even when tlisinherited therein, was 
a person whom testator has named in his will as 77ieus heres) 
a term used later of first successors to an intestate. But in 
quite early times any of the consortes could ask for a division 
of the inheritance, being then said erctum ciere, ' to summon to 
a fencing off ' (see below, item 10 of this Table). Note the 
difference between heres and legatarius : after legal disposal 
of property by will was instituted, every vahd will had to 
mention the heres or the heredes, Avho were beneficiaries and 
executors; a legalarius was a person to whom a heres must 
deliver something conferred by the testator, (ii) The kinds 
of will or testamentmn referred to below in the Twelve Tables 
woidd be the two oldest forms of public will, one sanctioned in 



1 

Gaius, Inst., I, 144-5 : Veteres . . . voluerunt feminas, 
etsi perfectae aetatis sint, propter animi levitatem in 
tutela esse . . . (145) exceptis virginibus Vestalibus, 
quas etiam veteres in honorem sacerdotii liberas esse 
voluerunt. Itaque etiam Lege XII Tabularum cautum est. 

Cp. op. cit., 155, 157. 



" sc. of their agnates (Gai., Inst., I, 157), for which see below, 
if not of a testamentary guardian (id., I, 155). This, according 
to the Twelve Tables, applied to immature males also. Thus 

444 



TABLE V 

Table V 

Guardianship 

the comitia calata (part of the c, curiata) at one of its two 
meetings every year, the other, testamentum in procinctu, 
made by soldiers in military array {prochictus is ' a girding 
up '). The third form of will (a private one per aes et lihram 
or mancipatory will — cf. pp. 428-9, 446 by which testator 
mancipated his estate at a nominal sum to a friend for disposal 
after testator's death) was apparently instituted later than the 
Twelve Tables. In the first form of will the comitia at least 
witnessed the will if it did not also ratify it by vote. It is 
doubtful whether in this form of will a heres was appointed or 
whether merely particular legacies were dealt with; if a 
heres was appointed, then it probably meant that there was 
no natural descendant who would be the successor in any case. 
For these problems see Jolowicz, Historical I ntroductioyi, 125- 
134. With regard to the order of fragments of the Tivelve Tables, 
note here one clue : from Dig., XXXVIII, 6, 1, pr. we learn 
that testamentary succession preceded intestacy in the code, 
(iii) Guardianship and guardians were tutela and iutores 
respectively w^here the incapacity was due to youth or to 
female sex, ciira or ciiratio, and cnratores respectively when 
the wards were lunatics or spendthrifts. Tutela and cura 
existed only over people who were (except for the tutela or 
cura) sui iuris, their own masters. 

1 

Status of ivonien ; their jnoperty : 

Gains : Our ancestors have seen fit that females, by reason 
of levity in disposition, should remain in guardianship ^ 
even when they have attained their majority. . , . 
We except the Vestal Mrgins ; even our ancestors saw 
fit, out of respect for the Virgins' priesthood, that these 
should be free from control ; and so there was also a 
provision made to this effect in the Law of the Twelve Tables. 

women could not be sui iuris. This system had lost much of 
its effect by the time of the Roman Empire. 

445 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

2 

Gaius, Inst., II, 47 : Item olim mulieris quae in agna- 
torum tutela erat res mancipi usucapi non poterant 
praeterquam si ab ipsa tutore auctore traditae essent ; 
idque ita Lege XII Tabularuin cautuni erat. 

Cp. Gai., I, 157. 



Ulpianus, Tit., XI, 14 : Testamento . . . nominatira 
tutores dati confirmantur eadem Lege XII Tabularuin his 
verbis — 

^ Uti legassit super [familia] pecuuia tutelave suae 
rei, ita ius esto. 

Cp. Gai., Inst., II, 224; lustinian., Inst., II, 22, pr. ; Nov., 
XX, 2, pr.; Ulp., fr. XI, 14; Cic, de Invent., II, 50, 148; ad 
Ilerenn., 1, 13, 23; Pompon., Dig., L, 16, 120; Paul., Dig., L, 
16, 53, pr.; XXVI, 2, 20, 1; Gai., ap. Dig.; XXVI, 2, 1. 



3 uti legassit suae rei ita ius esto Gai., Inst. ; Pomp., Dig. ; 
lustinian., Inst. uti legassit quisque de sua re ita ius esto 
lustinian., Nov. uti legassit super pecunia tutelave suae 
rei ita ius esto Ulp. paterfiimilias uti super familia 
pecuniaque sua legaverit {aut legassit) ita ius esto Cic; auct. 
ad Herenn. super pecuniae tutelaeve suae Paul. {Dig.) 



" i.e. directions given to the heir about legatees (see notice, 
p. 444). The much discussed law cited next from Ulpian, 
although the later Romans interjireted the words uti legassit 
very widely, should j)robably not be taken as giving un- 
restricted freedom in making a will. Normally a testator 
having a family would use words and formulas under advice 
of a legal expert; these as stated by testator were to be 
respected. The enactment may refer to the third form of 
will indicated.in the notice to Table V, given above, pp. 414 - 5, 

446 



TABLE V 

2 

Gaius : Again, the conveyable possessions of a woman 
who was under the guardianship of agnates at one time 
could not rightfully be acquired by * usucapio ' or 
long usage save such possessions as had been delivered 
up by her with a guardian's sanction ; and there had been 
a provision made to this effect by the Laiv of the Tivelve Tables. 

3 

Directions given by testator : " 

Ulpian : The status of guardians provided by name in a will 
is confirmed by the same Law of the Tivelve Tables in these 
words — 

^ According as person shall bid^ regarding his 
[household,] chattels ^ or guardianship of his 
estate, so shall right be. 

but the view is generally taken that that form was instituted 
later than the Tables. This enactment shows well how 
great was the need felt for interpretation of the Tables' 
wording. 

^ lego in its old sense ' give direction ' or ' order.' 
" Pecunia ma}^ if we omit familia here, mean aU the 
objects possessed. But the inferior tradition of this enact- 
ment adds here farnilia, which meant especially household 
property, and, above all, slaves. Thus pecunia may be the 
non-working animals such as sheep and goats, and also 
pastured oxen. At any rate, at one time pecunia and familia 
were surely distinct though often taken by the Romans 
(even by the Tables — V, 7a; V, 10; V, 5) as synonymous. 
Some have thought that here familia is all res mancipi (but 
not including land), while pecunia is all res nee mancipi; 
for some pecus or cattle such as pastured oxen, sheep and 
goats, was not res mancipi ; on these, see pp. 460-1 . Ita ius 
esto, ' so shall law hold good.' 

447 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

4-5 

lustinianus, Inst., Ill, 1, 1 : Intestatorum . . . liereditates 
ex Lege XII Tabularum primum ad suos heredes pertinent. 

lustinianus, Inst., IT, 13, 5 : Utraque persona in hominum 
procrcatione similiter naturae officio fungitur, et Lege antiqua 
XII Tabularum omnes similiter ad successiones ab intestate 
vocabantur. 

Ulpianus, Tit., XXVI, 1 : Si sui heredes non sint, ad con- 
sanguineos (sc. intestatorum imjenuorum liereditates jpertinent) 
... Si nee hi sint, ad reliquos agnatos proximos, id est 
cognates vu'ilis sexus, per mares descendentes eiusdem 
familiae; id enim cautum est lege XII Tabularum hac — 

* Si intestate moritur, cui suus heres nee escit, 
adgnatus proximus familiam habeto. 

Cp. Cic., de Invent., II, 50, 148; Ulp., Dig., L, 16, 195, 1 ; 
Paul., Dig., XXVIII, 2, 9, 2; Gai., Inst., Ill, 11; lustinian., 
Ill, 1, 1; 9; III, 2, 7; 15; III, 2, pr., 3; 5; III, 5, 1 ; 5. 

Ulpianus, Coll. Mos. et R., XVI, 4, 2 : Si agnatus defuncti 
non sit, eadem lex XII Tabularum gentiles ad hereditatem 
vocat his verbis — 

^ Si adgnatus nee escit, gentiles familiam habento. 

Cp. Gai., Inst., Ill, 17 ; Paul., Coll., XVI, 3, 3 ; Cic, I.e. 

* escit Cuiac. pro est 

^ nee e. Cuiac. nescit Ulp. habento add. Momms. 

<* A suus heres (heir who had been in paternal power of 
deceased until latter's death : see notice on pp. 444-5) was 
regarded not as a successor but as having held the father's 
property in common with him by dormant right which became 
active automatically on the father's death. The quotation 
here given is perhaps rightly taken as merely an interpretation 
of the statute about agnates given below from Ulpian. But 
the Tables may have expressly laid down the custom as law. 

'' brothers and sisters begotten by the same father. 

'' agnati were persons, male or female, related to one another 
through males naturally or by some form of adoption. Note 

448 



TABLE V 

4-5 

Intestacy ; self-successors ; agnates ; gentiles {clansmen) : 

Justinian : Inheritances of persons who die intestate fall first, 
by the Law of the Twelve Tables, to self-successors." 

Justinian : Both sexes perform equally the function of nature 
in perpetuating mankind, and by the ancient Law of the 
Twelve Tables all were called equally to succession by an 
ancestor intestate on decease. 

Ulpian : If there be no self-successors, the inheritances of 
free-born persons who have died intestate belong to blood- 
relations * ... if these likewise be lacking, to the nearest 
of the remaining agnate relations,*^ that is, kinsmen by blood 
who are of the male sex and trace their descent through males 
of the same family; for that is the provision laid down in the 
following law of the Twelve Tables — 

* If person dies intestate, and has no self-successor, 
nearest agnate male kinsman shall have posses- 
sion of deceased's household.^ 

Ulpian also says : Should there be no agnate of one deceased, 
the same law of the Twelve Tables calls the gentiles,^ clansmen, 
to the inheritance, in these words — 

^ If there is no agnate male kinsman, deceased's 
clansmen shall have possession of his house- 
hold./ 

that agnatic inheritance (and guardianship — see below) were 
instituted by the Tables (Ulp., fr. XXVII, 5; XI, 3), while 
testamentary inheritances were merely confirmed by them 
[Dig., L, 16,"^ 130). This succession by agnates was probably 
thus instituted to meet the case of plebeians whose possession of 
gentes was not yet recognised ; for the gentiles, see law 5 below. 

^ or ' estate,' for here familia includes cattle — see above, 
p. 447, n. c. 

' gentiles were persons all belonging to the same gens. 
They of course included agnates when these existed, 
see above, n. d, and p. 447. 

449 
VOL. Ill, G G 



'riu: twJ':l\'e tablks 

lustinian., Inst., Ill, 3, pr. : Lex XII Tahulanim . . . 
praeponcbat masculonim ])rogcnicm ct cos (jiii per fciiunini 
sexiis neoessitucUncra si hi iunguntur adeo exp('llel)at ut iic 
quidem inter matrem et filium filiamve ultro eitroque here- 
ditatis capiendae ius daret. 

6 

Gains, Inst., I, 155 : Quibus testamento . . . tutor 
datiis non sit, iis ex Lege XII Tabularum agnati sunt 
tutores. 

Cp. lustinian., Inst., I, L"), pr. ; ep. Ulp., fr. XI, 3. 

7a-c 
auct., ad Herenn., I, 13, 23 : Lex est — 
'* Si furiosus escit, adgnatum gentiliumciue in co 

pecuniaque eius potestas esto. 
Cp. Cic., de Invent., II, 50, 148; Tusc. Disp., Ill, 5, 11. 

Festus, 162, 14 : ' Nee ' coniunctionem grammatici fere dicunt 
esse disiunctivam . . . cum si diligentius inspiciatur, ut fecit 
Sinnius Capito, intellegi possit earn positam esse ab antiquis 
pro non, ut et in XII est — 

■^^ Ast ei custos nee eseit, 

Cp. Gai., Inst., II, 64. 

'« Si furiosus escit <ast ei custos nee escit) Schoell, ex 
Fest. 162, 14 sqq. ; vide infra 

'^^ ast ei custos nee escit add it Schoell post Si furiosus escit 
in auct., ad Herenn., I, 13, 23; Cic, de Invent., II, 50, 148; 
vide supra 

" except that if she was in the manus of her husband (sec 
below, p. 462, n. a), she became her children's nearest agnate, 
and 80 entered in default oi sui heredes — Gains, /w*7., Ill, 24. 

* sc. pupil males or unmarried females. 

' Agnate guardianship was instituted by the Tables — see 
above, p. 448. Failing agnates, doubtless it was the gentiles 



TABLE V 

{Interpretation of this enactment :) 

Justinian : The Law of the Twelve Tables . . . })refcrred the 
issue of males, and those who are related to each other through 
females it excluded so strictly that it granted reciprocal rights 
of taking an inheritance not even between a mother " and her 
son or daughter. 

6 

Guardianship : 

Gaius : To persons ^ for whom a guardian has not 
been appointed by will, to them, by the Law of the Twelve 
Tables, agnates '^ are guardians. 

7a-c 

Guardianship) of lunatics and prodigals : 

The author of To Herennius : A Law says — 

"^^ If a man is raving mad, rightful authority over 

his person and chattels shall belong to his 

agnates or ^ to his clansmen. 

Festus: 'Nee'; grammarians generally say that this word is 
a disjunctive conjunction . . . whereas if it is examined more 
carefully, as Sinnius Capito has done, one can see that it was 
used by archaic writers for ' non,' like moreover the following 
example, in the Ticelve Tables — 

"'^ But if ^ there shall be not trustee for him, 

who took guardianship of sane wards as they did in the case 
of lunatics and prodigals — see next quotations. 

^ i.e. failing agnates. This held good even before the 
lunatic's death; for Gaius, Lnst., II, 54 refers to this enact- 
ment when he is not deaUng with inheritances. Pecunia 
is here all effects, not merely the non-working farm-animals 
such as sheep and goats ; for this, see above pp. 446-7. Note 
the \voTd furiosus, stronger than insanus. 

* ' ast ' means ' if,' or rather ' but if.' This fr. should 
perhaps be inserted in the preceding one, after si furiosus 
escit. Yet it seems to imply some kind of safe custody apart 
from agnates and clansmen. 

451 



THE TWEL\ E TABLES 

UIi)ianus, ap. Dig., XXVII, 10, 1 : Lege XII Tabularum 
^•^ prodigo interdicitur bonorum suorum administratio. 
Ulpianus, Tit., XII, 2 : Lex XII Tabularum furiosum 
itemque prodigum, cui bonis intcrdictuni est, in 
curatione iubet esse agnatorum. 

Cp. lustinian., Inst., I, 23, 3; Dig., XXNTF, K), 13. 



8 

Ulpianus, Tit., XXIX, 1 : Civis Romani liberti hered- 
itatem Lex XIT Tabularum patrono defert, si intestate 
sine suo herede libertus decesserit. 

Gaius, Inst., I, 165 : Ex eadem Lege XII Tabularum 
libertarum et impuberum libertonim tutela ad patronos 
liberosque eorum pertinet. Quae et ipsa tutela legitima 
vocatur, non quia nominatim ca Lege de hac tutela cavetur, 
sed quia proinde accepta est per interpretationem atque si 
verbis legis introducta esset. EJo enim ipso, quod hereditates 
libertorum libertarumque, si intestati decessissent, iusserat 
Lex ad patronos liberosve eorum })ertinere, crediderunt 
veteres voluisse legem etiam tutelas ad eos pertinere, quia et 
agnatos, quos ad hereditatem vocavit, eosdem et tutores esse 
iusserat. 

Cp. lustinian., Inst., T, 17, pr. ; Gai., Inst., Ill, 40. 

Gaius, hist.. Ill, 49 : Patronae olim . . . hoc solum ius 
habebant in bonis libertorum, quod etiam patronis ex Lege 
XII Tabularum datum est. 



" For the problem of the prodigi at the time of the Twelve 
Tables, cf. Jolowicz, Historical Introduction, 121. Note that 
guardianship over lunatics (including imbeciles) and prodigals 
is not tutela but cura. 

* The only words which actually survive of this enactment or 
group of enactments are given below, pp. 454-5. 

« who could have no agnates. 

452 



TABLE V 

Ulpian : By the Laic of the Twelve Tables a "^^ spendthrift 
is forbidden to exercise administration over his own 
goods. Ulpian also says : The Law of the Tivelve Tables 
ordains that a person who, being insane or a spend- 
thrift," is prohibited from administering his own goods, 
shall be under the trusteeship of agnates. 



Freedmen and patrons ; guardiansliip and intestacy ^ : 
Ulpian: The inheritance of a Roman citizen-freed- 
man is, by the Laiv of the Tivelve Tables, made over to his 
patron, if the freedman has died intestate and having 
no self-successor. 

Interpretations of this enactment : 

Gains: By the same Laio of the Twelve Tables the guardianship 
of freedwomen, and of freedmen '^ below the age of puberty, 
belongs to the patron '^ and the patron's children. This 
guardianship also (sc. besides that of agnates) is called statutory, 
not because the provision in that Laiv expressly mentions this 
guardianship, but because it has by interpretation received 
as much acceptance as if its introduction had been made in 
express terms by the Law. For, since the Laio had ordained 
that inheritances of freedmen or freedwomen, if they had 
died intestate,'' belonged to the patrons and the patrons' 
children, for that very reason the ancients f believed that 
the Laio desired that the guardianships also should fall to 
them, because the Law had ordained ? that the agnates whom 
it called to succeed to an inheritance should be guardians also. 

Gaius : At one time, patronesses . . . had no more than the 
same rights in the goods of their freedmen as were granted by 
the Law of the Twelve Tables to patrons. 

'' that is, the person who had manumitted them from 
slavery. 

* and had no suits heres — see Ulpian quoted just above. 
f sc. the lawyers of the Republic. 
' of. fr. 7a-c above. 

453 



THE TWEL\^E TABLES 

Gaius, Inst., Ill, 51 : Quod ... ad libertinarum bona 
pertinet, si quidein intestatae decesserint ... si neque ipsa 
patrona neque liberta capite deminuta sit, ex Lege XII 
Tabularum ad earn hereditas pertinet et excluduntur libertae 
liberi, quod iuris est etiam si liberis honorata non sit patrona. 
. . . ISi vero vel huius vel illius capitis deminutio interveniat, 
rursus liberi libertae excludunt patronam. 

Cp. lustinian., Insf., Ill, 7, 3. 

Ulpianus, ap. Dig., L, 10, 195, 1 : De patrono et liberto 
. . . Lex— 

^ ex ea faniilia in earn faniiliam 

9 

Gordianus, C, III, 36, 6 : Ea (juae in nominibus sunt 
non recipiunt divisionem cum ipso iure in portiones 
hereditarias ex Lege XII Tabularum divisa sunt. 

Diocletianus, C, II, 3, 26 : Ex Lege XII Tabularum aes 
alienum hereditarium pro portionibus quacsitis singu- 
lis ipso iure divisum. 

Cp. Dig., X, 2, 25, 9, 13; C. IV, 16, 7; 8, 35, 1. 

10 
Gaius, ap. Dig., X, 2, 1 : Haec actio {sc. ' fjimiliae 
erciscundae ') proficiscitur e Lege XII Tabularum, namque 

^ famiUa inquit Ulp. ex ea familia {i.e. gente) <qui 
liberatus erit, eius bona> in eam faniiliam <revertuntor> 
Momms. ea familia i. e. f. <ius habeto> Husehke 
pecunia ex ea familia in patroni familiam redito coni. Voigt 

" because a woman could not have a suus heres. 

^ It is not known how these words apply to a patronus 
succeeding to an intestate libertus. 

" .sc. of an estate amongst coheirs. See next note and item 
10. 

^ The passage from Gordian quoted before that from 
Diocletian implies that when there were several heirs, each 
coheir could proceed against a debtor of deceased only for so 
much of the debt as corresponded to coheir's share of the 
inheritance. The passage from Diocletian means that 

454 



TABLE V 

Gaius : With regard to the goods of freedwomen, if they have 
died intestate ... if neither the patroness herself nor the 
freedwoman has undergone any forfeiture of civil rights, by 
the Law of the Twelve Tables the inheritance falls to the 
patroness, and the children of the freedwoman are excluded,** 
and this holds good in law even if the patroness has not been 
honoured with children . . . But if of either one or the other 
there has befallen any forfeiture of civQ rights, conversely the 
children of the freedwoman exclude the patroness. 

Ulpian : The Laiv . . . about patron and freedman says — 
^ from said household into said household '^ 

9 
Division of inheritance. Claims hy heirs against debtors of 
deceased ; liability of heirs for debts owed by deceased : 

Gordian : Items which are in the category of debts 
are not included in di\ision when by the Law of the Twelve 
Tables they have with automatic right been divided 
into portions of an inheritance.'^ 

Diocletian : By the Law of the Ticelve Tables debt 
bequeathed by inheritance was divided proportionally 
amongst each heir with automatic liability when the 
details had been investigated.'^ 

10 

Division of inheritance ; withdrawal from coheirship : 

Gaius, on apportionment of a family-estate ^ : This 
procedure takes its departure from the Laio of the Twelve 

similarly each coheir is liable for a share of deceased's debts to 
others according to coheir's share of the inheritance. For 
division of inheritance, see the next passage from Gaius. 

* that is, on the judicial division of an estate, by a index 
exercising adiudicatio, amongst coheirs if these disagreed. 
Familia is here used apparently in its wide sense (see above, 
p. 447, n. c; 449). A coheir asking for division was said 
erctum ciere, ' to summon to a fencing-off ' (see above, notice 
to Table V, p. 444). 

455 



TIIK 'IWiaAi: TABLES 

cohcredibus volentibus a communione discedere 
necessarium vidcbatur aliquam actionem constitui qua inter 
eos res hcrcditariae distribuerentur. 

Cp. Paul., ex Fest., 58, 12; Gell., 1, 9, 12; Scrv., ad Aen., 
Vri, 042. 



Tabula J' I 

la 

Festus, 180, 9 : ' Nuncupata peeunia ' est, ut ait Cincius in 
lib. 11 de Officio lurisconsulti, nominata, certa, nominibus 
propriis pronuntiata — 

1* Cum nexum faciet mancipiumque, uti lingua 
nuncupassit, ita ius esto. 

Id est, uti nominavit, locutusve erit, ita ius esto. 

Cp. Cic, de Or., I, 57, 245 (. . . in XII TabuUs . . .); de 
Offic, III, 16, 65; Paul., Vat.fr., 50; Gai., Inst., I, 119; II, 
104; Varr., L.L., VI, 60. 

i<* = 1 Bruns 

** For tnanclpimn, mancipalio see above, p. 428, n. a. 
Nexum : on the sj)ecial meaning of this various opinions are 
held. Down to about 326 B.C. there were persons called 
next (' bound ') who were debtors made (by the procedure per 
ae.s et lU)rani ' by copper and scales ' as in nianci patio) bondsmen 
to their creditors (\'arro, L.L., VII, 105; Gains, Inst., Ill, 
173-5). I^robably nexnm was (i) any legal bond, to which the 
ceremony per aes el libram came in time to be attached; 
(ii) particularly the bond by which a debtor incurred a debt; 
(iii) self-mancipation of debtor by debtor to creditor to be the 
latter's bondsman {nexus) in order to escape judgment for 
un])aid del)t and with j^rospect of release when the debt was 
])ai(l (.Mitteis, Zeitschrijt d. S(iriqni/-Stiftang, Roinan. Alt., 
XXri, 9()ir.; XXV, 282; Rom.' Privalrecht, I, 136 ff.; 

45^^ 



TABLE VI 

Tables, for when coheirs expressed a wish to withdraw 
from common and equal participation, it seemed neces- 
sary that there should be established some sort of procedure 
by which such bequeathed effects could be divided amongst 
them. 

A larv touching on rtianumission by testament, mentioned by 
Ulpian, is given below, Table VI, Id, among the laws about 
possession. 

Table VI 

AcqiiisitioJi. Possession 

la 

Transfer of property : 

Festus : ' Xuncupata pecunia ' is, according to Cincius in the 
second book of On the Duties of a Laivyer, effects or chattels 
named or specified, publicly proclaimed each under its own 
name — 

^^ When party shall make bond * or conveyance, 
according as he has named by word of mouth,'' 
so shall right hold good.'' 

That is, according as he shall have pronounced or spoken 
them by name, so shall the right hold good. 



contrast the old view in Huschke, Ueber das Recht des Nexum, 
which is still widely accepted. Cf. De Zulueta, L.Q.R., 
XXIX, 1913, 137 ff. Here again we have an enactment which 
especially invited interpretation. Cf. Riccobono, Fontes, XV. 

* More literally, ' according as he has named {or specified, 
spoken) with tongue.' That litujua is here ablative, not 
nominative, is indicated but not proved by a passage in Cic, 
de Off., Ill, 16, 65, quoted below : quae essent lingua nun- 
cupata . . . 

c or, ' so shall the law stand.' The enactment may have 
simply confirmed the purchaser's words at a mancipatio, 
or have sanctioned conveyance without immediate payment ; 
or it may have served both purposes. 

457 



THE 'nVEUOL TABLES 

lb 

Paul., Vat., Jr. 50: Et mancipationem ct in iiire cessionem 
Lex XII Tabularum confinnat. 

Ic 

lustinianus, Inst., II, 1, 41 : \'enditae . . . (j'es) et 
traditae non aliter emptori acquiruntur quam si is 
venditori pretium solverit, vel alio modo ei satis- 
fecerit veluti expromissore aut pii>:nore dato. Quod 
cavetur quidem etiam Lege XII Tabularum, tamen recte 
dicitur et lure gentium, id est iure naturali, id effici. 

Cp. Pompon., Dig., XVIII, I, 19. 

Id 

Ulpianus, Tit., IT, 4 : Sub hac conditione liber esse 
iussus si CCI33 milia heredi dederit, etsi ab herede 
abalienatus sit, emptori dando pecuniam ad liberta- 
tem perveniet ; idque Lex XII Tabularum iubet. 

Pomponius, ap. Dig., XL, 7, 29, 1 : Lex XII Tabularum 
emptionis verbo omnem alienationem eomplexa . . . 

1* = 5b Bruns 

1^'' = Tab. VII, 11-12 Bruns 

« See pp. 428-9,463. 

* That is, by traditio, or mere formal delivery (as being 
traditio of res nee manci2)i), not by mancipalio. But this 
explanation states a ruling which seems to have been made 
only in post-classical times. Perhaps the ruling after all refers 
to handing over of res conveyed by vicmcipatio, for which see 
pp. 428-9. At any rate the rule here given by Justinian must 
have been applied to res viancipatae at the time of the Tables. 
This enactment is usually placed near the end of Table VIII ; 
cf. .Aluirhead, 122, 149. 

<■ In this case a statulibcr, free on appointed con- 
dition, a slave ordered in a will to become free on some 
condition. 



TABLE VI 

lb 

Paulus : Both mancipation and surrender in court " are 
procedures confirmed by the Laiv of the Twelve Tables. 

Ic 

Establishment of right to an article : 

Justinian : Articles which have been sold and handed 
over ^ are not acquired by a buyer otherwise than 
when he has paid the price to the seller or has 
satisfied him in some other way, that is, by providing 
a guarantor or a security. This is certainly laid down by 
a provision in the Laiv of the Twelve Tables ; yet it may be 
rightly said to be brought about by international law, that is, 
by natural law. 

Id 

Manumission hj testament : 

Ulpian : A person '^ who has been ordained a free 
man under this condition, namely, if he has bestowed a 
sum of 10,000 pieces on the heir, though he has 
been alienated by the heir, shall win his freedom 
by giving the money to the purchaser ; and this is 
ordained by the Laiv of the Twelve Tables.'^ 

Pomponius : The Laiv of the Tivelve Tables embraced by the 
word emptio ' acquisition by exchange ' every kind of 
aHenation. 

^ This enactment of the Tables (which is usually put at 
end of Table VIII) probably confirmed rather than created 
the commonest form of manumission with enfranchisement — 
that by testament um or will, witnessed or sanctioned by the 
comitia calata, the other two forms, sanctioned by the 
developed Roman law, being that by vindicta (wand) which 
was common, and that by census (enrolment in list of citizens) 
which was less frequent. If the story told by Livy, II, 5 
can be beHeved, then manumission by vimlicta also, confirmed 
by a magistrate, existed at the time of the Tables. 

459 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

Modestinus, ap. Dig., XL, 7, 25 : Statu liberos venum dari 
posse leges XII Tabularum putaverunt. 

Cp. Fest., 458, 7. 

2 

Cicero, de Off., Ill, 16, 65 : Cum ex XII Tabulis satis 
csset ea praestari quae essent liiiijua nuncupata, quae 
qui infitiatus esset dupli poenam subiret, a iuris consultis 
etiam reticentiae poena est eonstituta. 

3 

Gains, Insi., II, 42 : <(L suea])io autem) mobilium rerum 
anno conpletur, fundi vero et aedium biennio ; et ita 
Lege XII Tabularum cautum est. 

Cicero, Top., IV, 23 : Usus auctoritas fundi biennium 
est . . . ceterarum rerum omnium . . . annuus est usus. 
Cp. Cic, pro. Caec, 19, 54. 

" when asked about them. 

'' sc. double the proportionate part of the price or of the 
things transferred. It is generally thought that this enact- 
ment refers to the mancipation of land and applies to a case 
where some area was found to be less than had been stated. 

'^ Usucapio, ' holding the use ' or ' holding by use ' (a 
method of acquiring ownership by civil law, the other two being 
mancipatio and ni iure cessio — see above, pp. 428-9, 463) means 
the obtaining of OA^Tiership by usus, ' continued having and 
use ' for a period of time. The Tables (Jid not apparently 
create this, but only regulated it. 

^ This shows that at the time of the Tables private property' 
in land existed apart from the heredium (on this see below, 
]). 468); and it shows the natural distmction between ' real,' 
or immovable, and ' personal ' property. But the Romans 
had another and entirely Roman distinction, namely between 
(i) res mancipl (land; larger farm-beasts such as beasts of 
draught and burden including drauglit-oxen ; slaves ; rustic 
servitudes: all being regarded as ])art oi the familia, the real 
workers of an estate) which could be transferred by mancipatio 
or by in iure cessio (for which see pp. 428-9, 463); and (ii) 

460 



TABLE VI 

Modcstinus : The laws of the Tivelve Tables were of the 
opinion that slaves who were free-on-condition could be given 
for sale. 

2 

Declaration of burdens or flaws : 

Cicero : By the Twelve Tables it was sufficient to make 
good such faults as had been named by word of mouth, 
and that for any flaws which the vendor had expressly 
denied,'^ he should undergo penalty of double 
damages ; ^ but jurisconsults have established a like penalty 
even for failure to make such declaration. 

3 

Usucapio of things : '^ 

Gaius : ' Usucapio ' of movable things requires one 
year's possession for its completion ; but usucapio 
of an estate and buildings, two years' ; and to this effect 
provision ^ was made in the Latv of the Twelve Tables. 

Cicero : The lapse of time in order to establish title to 
possession and enjoyment ^ of an estate is a period of two 
years ... of all other things enjojanent lasts one year only 
(in order to estabhsh the right). 

res nee mancipi, which were all other things, including goats, 
sheep and swine and even pastured oxen, which were capable 
of transfer by mere traditio, delivery. But note that in early 
times, so long as uncoined copper was by weight the medium 
of exchange, conveyance of all tilings was probably per aes 
et libravi ; when counting superseded weighing, then came 
the alteration by which conveyance iier aes et libram was 
restricted to res 'rnancipi. See p. 515. 

" But usus like auctoritas may here be nominative : ' Since 
time for usucapio of an estate and time within which an 
actio auctoritatis can be brought is two years. , . .' Actio 
auctoritatis was an action by transferee against transferor 
where latter, not being owner of the property transferred, 
failed to support the title he had transferred when such title 
had been successfully won by real owner from transferee. 

461 



nil'. t\vi:l\j<: tables 



Gains, Ixsl., I, 111 : Usu in nianum convenicbat, quae anno 
continno nupta pcrscvcrabat ; quia onim vcluti annua pos- 
scssione usucapicbatur, in fi^miliani viri transibat fiiiaeque 
locum o})tincbat. Itaque Lege XII Tabularum cautum est 
lit siqiia nollet eo modo in manum mariti convenire, 
ea quotannis trinoctio abesset atque eo modo usum 
cuiusqiie anni interrumperet. Sed hoc totum ius partim 
legibus sublatum est, partim ipsa desuetudiiie oblittcratum est. 



Cp. GeU., Ill, 2, 12 



5a-b 



Gellius, XX, 10, 6-8 : ' ]\Ianum conscrere ' . . . corrcptio 
{an oonsertio?) mauus in re atque in loco pracsenti apud 
[praetorem] ex XII Tabulis fiebat, in quibus ita scriptum 
est — 

^* Si [qui] in lure manum conserunt, 

Paulus, Vat. Jr., 50 : ^^ Et mancipationem et in iurc 
cessionem Lex XII Tabularum confirmat. 



^^ qui seclud. Schoell 



" This describes not a woman's method of obtaining a 
divorce, but how a wife could remain married to her husband 
witliout passing into or remaining in his manus or ' rights of 
possession.' cf. 0. Karlowa, Romische RechI sqeschichte, II, 
163. Jolowicz, Historical Introduction, pp. 115-6. Here we 
])robably see the Tables recognising the varying views of 
marriage in Rome, and striking some sort of a blow at the 
patria jwtestas. 

^ To make joint seizure, where the ])arties both at the 
same time laid their hands on the object of disputed claim. 
The origin of the procedure was probably a trial by fight or 
battle, ' to join hand to hand in combat.' 



462 



TABLE VI 



Usucapio of a wife : 

Gaius : A woman became subjected to her husband's ' hand 
by enjoyment' when she had Hved as his wedded wdfe with- 
out interruption for one year ; for because she had been as it 
were ' held by enjoyment ' in one year's possession, she was 
transferred to the man's estabhshment and occupied the status 
of a daughter ; and so there was made in the Law of the Twelve 
Tables a provision that any ^^■oman who did not wish to 
be subjected in this manner to the hand of her 
husband should be absent for three nights in suc- 
cession every year, and so interrupt the usucapio of 
each year." But the whole of this legal enactment has been 
in part abohshed by statute and in part obUterated simply by 
change of custom. 

5a-b 
Joint seizure : 

Gellius : ' Manum conserere,' * to join hand on, laj^ hands on 
. . . Seizure with the hand, according to the Ticelve Tables, 
used to take place directly on the thing or on the place in 
question, in the presence of the [praetor] ; there occur the 
following words in the Tables — ■ 

^^ If parties lay on hand together in law,'' 

Paulus : 5b Both mancipation and surrender in court are 
procedures confirmed by the Laic of the Twelve Tables. 



' that is, in the presence of a magistrate (as though in iure 
in court), who went to the place where the disputed thing was. 
Transferee grasped and claimed the thing conveyed; 
transferor, asked by magistrate whether he makes counter- 
claim, said no or was silent. ]Magistrate then assigned thing 
to transferee. The whole ceremony was called in iure cessio, 
' surrender in court.' In the time of the Tables the magistrate 
was a consul, not a praetor. 

463 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

6 

Liviu8, III, 41, 12 : Postulant ut rem intcgrain in patris 
adventum diflferat (sc. Appius Claudius), lege ab ipso lata 
vindicias det secundum libertatem. 

Cp. Pompon., ap. Dig., I, 2, 2, 24; et Liv., II 1, 562, 4, 6; 
Dionys. Hal., Anliqu., XI, 30. 

7-9 

Festus, 556, 25 (p. 502 Linds.) : ' Tignum ' non solum in 
aediliciis quo utuntur appellatur, sed etiam in vineis, ut est 
in XII— 

■^ Tignum iunctum acdibus vineaeve e compace ne 
solvito. 

Cp. Paul., Dig., VI, 1, 23, 6; lustinian., Inst., II, 1, 29. 

Ulpianus, ap. Dig., XLVIT, 3, 1 : ^ Lex XII Tabularuni neque 
solvere permittit tignum furti\uin aedibus vel vineis iunctum 
neque vindicare ; quod providenter Lex effecit, ne vel aedificia 
sub hoc praetextu diruantur vel vinearum cultura turbetur. 
Sed in eum qui convictus est iunxisse, in duplum dat 
actionem. 



' vineaeve Cuiacius vineaecjue S vineave vel vine- 
aque cdd. (apogr.) Fest. e compage Bosius sei concapit 
(== concipit) Husclike e concapi Schoell e concape 0. 
Mr. et concapit cdd. {apogr.) concapitum Cuiacius 



" more literally ' following ' or ' on the side of liberty.' 
Appius was one of the decemvirs, and the law referred to 
was ])art of the Tirelve Tables. Cp. Dionys. Hahc, Antiqu. 
XI, 31. Appius, lusting after Virginia (in the absence of her 
fatlier), caused a retainer of his to claim her as a slave born in 
retainer's household. Her legal representatives demanded 
postponement of the matter until the father's return, because 
Appius' own law had enacted that the person of no one 
claimed as a slave should be handed over to claimant until the 

464 



TABLE VI 
6 

Livy : They demanded that Appius Claudius should postpone 
the matter undecided until the father's arrival; by a law 
proposed by Appius himself, he should meanwhile grant 
right of claim to party demanding client's freedom.^ 

7-9 

Stolen materials from buildings and vineyards : 

Festus : ' Tignum ' * is a term used not only of the material 
which men emploj^ in buildings, but also that in vineyards, as 
for example, in the Twelve — 

■^ Person shall not dislodge from framework beam ^ 
fixed in buildings or vineyard. '^ 

Ulpian : ^ The Law of the Ticelve Tables does not permit a 
man to dislodge a stolen beam when fixed in buildings or 
vineyards or to lay claim to it. This the Laiv effected with 
an eye to preventing buildings from being demolished and 
also the culture of vine3'ards from being disturbed under this 
pretext. Nevertheless the Law grants action ^ for double 
amount of damage against person who has been 
found guilty of fixing such beam./ 

question of claimant's right had been settled legally; and 
Virginia's case could not be so settled until her father had 
returned. So runs the storj^ 

* tignum ' beam ' included ever}^ kind of material used in 
buildings. 

'^ apparently (though this is disputed, Cuq, Inst, jurid. 
cles Bomains, 278) one which he claims to be his — see quotation 
from Ulpian below. 

''■ The text of Festus is corrupt here. That aedibus vineaeve 
(datives) are correct is indicated by Ulpian quoted next. In 
the vineyard, the beam would be inserted into a vine-trellis. 

* actio de tigno iniuncto or iuncto, as Justinian says. 

f that is, fixing in his own building some building-material 
which has been stolen from another person. On furtum, 
see p. 483, n. c. 

465 
VOL. III. H H 



THE 'nVKLVE TABLES 

Festus, 524, 3 : ' Sarpuntur ' vincac, id est putantur, ut in 
XII— 

^ quandoque sarpta, donee dempta erunt. 

Cp. luliun., ap. Di(j., VI, 1, 59. 

Tabula VII 
1 
Cicero, de Leg., I, 21, 55 : Usus eapionem XII Tabulae 
intra quinque pedes esse noluerunt. 

2 

Varro, L.L., V, 32 : XII Tabularum interpretes ambitus 
parietis cireuitum esse deseribunt. 

Volusius Maecianus, de Assis Distr., 46 : * Sestertius ' duos 
asses et semissem (valet) . . . Lex . . . XII Tabularum 
argumento est, in qua duo pedes et semis sestertius pes 
vocatur. 

Cp. Paul, ex. r., 5, 6; 12, 25. 

3 

Gains, ap. Dig., X, 1, 13 : Sciendum est in actione finium 
regundorum illud observandum esse quod ad excmplum 
quodanimodo eius legis scriptum est quam Athenis Solonem 
dicitur tulisse. Nam illic ita est : 'Eav tls aifxaolav vap^ 

1=4 Bruns ^ = 1 Bruns ' = 2 Bnins 

« called ' arbores ' ' trees ' in the Tables — see below, p. 483. 

* or 'whenever they (sc. vina, that is vines) have been 
pruned. . . .' The context of the enactment is not known. 

" which was reserved as a path between any two estates 
belonging to different owners. The quotation from Volusius 
given below indicates that responsibility for keeping half this 
space free fell on either of two contiguous owners. Both 
owners could walk on the whole space of 5 feet. The Tables 
here enact that neither could claim possession of the strip 
through continued usage. 

466 



TABLE VII 

Festus : * Sarpuntur ' is a verb applied to vines, ° and it means 
' are pruned,' for example in the Twelve — 

^ From time of first pruninor ^ until fruit shall have 
been gathered therefrom. 

Table VII 

Rights concerning Land 

1 
Boundaries heticeen properties ; farm-buildings : 

Cicero : The Twelve Tables ordained that ownership within 
a five-foot strip '^ {that is, of laml along a boundary -space) 
should not be acquired by long usage. 

2 

Varro : Interpreters of the Tivelve Tables define ' am- 
bitus,' '^ way round, as the same as the ' eircuitus ' round 
each outer wall of a building. 

Volusius : A ' sestertius ' {that is, semis-tertius, two and a half) 
is equal to two and a half a-s-units ... of this the Law of the 
Twelve Tables is evidence in which a length of two and a half 
feet is called a two and a half foot.^ 



Gains : We must remember, in an action for the marking of 
boundaries, that we must not overlook that old provision which 
was drawn up in a manner after the pattern of the law which 
Solon is said to have laid down at Athens. In that law occurs 
the following — ' If any man throws up a rough wall alongside 

^ an open space left all round a building. 

* Cf. Paul., ex F., 5, 6 : Ambitus proprie dicitur eircuitus 
aedficiorum patens duos piedes et semissem. It is clear from 
the quotations here given that the Tables ordained that every 
owner must leave a strip of 21 feet round his estate, whether 
this was a building only or not. 

467 
Hll 2 



THE TWRL\T. TABLES 

aXXoTpuo x'op'V '^P^T"''V> '''^v opov 1X7) rrapa^aLveiv €a.v 8e Teix^ov, 
TToBa dTToXeiTTdv eav 8e OLKrjfia, 8vo -nobas' iav 8e ra^pov t] 
^oupov opvTTTj, oaov TO ^dOos rj tooovtov aTroAeiTT-etv idv Se 
(ppeap, opyuidv eXaiav 8e Kal ovktjv evi-ea iroBas dno tov aXXorpiov 
<f>vreveii', rd 8e aAAa bdvbpa Tzevre TrdSa?. 

4a-b 
Plinius, X.H., XIX, 50 : In XII Tabulis Icgum nostrarura 
nusquam nominatur villa, semper in significationc ca hortus, 
in horti vcro heredium. 

[Festus, 536, 4 : {Tugu)ria a tecto appellantur . . .> 
tione XII ait etiam . . .] 

Cp. Paul., ex F., 73, 7 ; 71, 9; Pompon., ap. Dig., L, 16, 180. 

5a-b 
Cicero, de Bepiibl., IV, 8 (Non., 430, 26) : Admiror nee 
rerum solum, sed verborum etiam elegantiam — 

^^ Si iurgant, 

inquit. Benevolorum concertatio, non lis iniuiicorum, 
iurgium dicitur. . . . lurgare igitur Lex putat inter se vicinos, 
non litigare. 

Cicero, de Leg., I, 21, 55 : ^^ Quoniam usus capionem 
XII Tabulae intra quinque pedes esse noluenmt, depasci 
veterem possessionem Academiae ab hoc acuto homine non 
sinemus, nee Mamilia lege singuli, sed e XII tres arbitri fines 
regemus. 

^''-b = 3a-6 Bruns 

" There is no evidence whatever that any enactment of the 
Tables reproduced in any form the terms of the Greek law 
here quoted. 8tiU the Tables may have laid down some 
provisions of a like nature. 

'' any enclosure, whereas an enclosure which was \\allcd in 
was a cohors. 

" heredium was a plot of two iugera. 

^ The text is defective and the enactment referred to is 
unknown. 

" a dispute between good friends or between relations, and 
much milder than a lis. 

468 



TABLE VII 

another man's estate, he must not overstep the boundary ; if 
he plants a massy wall, he must leave one foot to spare; if a 
building two feet ; if he digs a trench or a hole, he must leave 
a space equal or about equal to the depth ; if a well, a fathom ; 
an olive-tree or a fig-tree he must plant nine feet from the other 
man's property, and any other fruit-trees five feet.' " 

4a-b 

Pliny : In the Tables of our laws the term ' villa ' (country-seat, 
farm-house) is nowhere mentioned; in all instances the word 
used with that meaning is ' hortus,' * enclosure, while for 
' hortus ' in the modern sense of 'garden ' the term ' heredium,' <= 
inherited plot is used. 

[Festus : ' Tuguria ' cottages is a term derived from 
' tectum ' . . . The Twelve . . .]^ 

5a-b 

Disj)utes between oivners of conterminous proj^erties : 

Cicero : I admire the excellence not only of the purport of 
the Laiv but also its diction — 

^^ If parties disagree, 

it says. By ' iurgium ' ^ is meant a contest between friends, 
not a quarrel between enemies. . . . The Laiv then thinks of 
neighbours as disagreeing, not quarreUing.-^ 

Arbitration in such disputes : 

Cicero : °b Since the Tivelve Tables ordained {see above, 
pp. 466-7) that ownership within a five-foot strip should 
not be acquired by long usage, we will not allow the ancient 
estate of the Academy to be eaten away by this sharp person ^ ; 
and the boundaries will be marked by us not as by one 
arbitrator apiece as by the ]\Ianiilian law * but as by three 
arbitrators, as required by the Twelve Tables. 

f Note that cases of dispute about boundarj^-spaces were 
tried in an actio finium regundorum by a iudex exercising 
a/liudicatio. 

the Stoic philosopher Zeno of Cyprus. 

'* brought forward probably by the tribune Mamilius in 
165 B.C. 

469 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

6 
Gaius, ap. Dig., VIII, 3, 8 : \'iae latitude ex Lege XII 
Tabularum in porrectum octo pedes habet, in anfractum, 
id est ubi flcxum est, sedecini. 

Cp. Varr., L.L., VII, 15; Fest., 564, 5; Dig., VIII, 3, 13, 2; 
6, Qfin. 

7 
Festus, 564, 1 : ' Viae ' . . . — 
■^ Viam muniunto. Ni sam delapidassint, qua volet 

iumenta agito. 
Cp. Cic., pro Caec, 19, 54 (. . . agere iumentum). 

8a-b 

Pomponius, ap. Dig., XLIII, 8, 5 : Sic et verba Legis XII 
Tabularum veteres interpretati sunt^ — 

8* Si aqua pluvia nocet, 
id est nocere poterit. 

Cicero, Toj)., 9, 39 : ' Aqua pluvia nocens ' . , . iubetur 
ab arbitro coerceri. 



' vias muniunto vel muniunt odd. (apogr.) alii alia ni 
sam delapidassint Morams. onisandi lapidassint Vat. Lai. 
3368 onisandi lapidas Par. sched., Leid. Voss. Lai. 09, Vat. 
Lat. 2731 muniuntod ; eo ni sani lapides sint Bergk alii alia 

Dig., XLIII, 8, 5 : noxa domino sarciatur I\Iomms. noxae 
domino caveatur Dig. 

« The context of Gaius where this quotation occurs shows 
that the roads referred to here, and in Festus quoted next, are 
prepared roads running through a man's land over which 
another person had a servilus (roughly an ' casement '). The 
Tables probabl}^ ])rovidcd also for the right oi iter (by walking 
or riding), o{ actaa (driving cattle) and oi aquae ductus (taking 
water) over another's land. Most if not all of the old ' rustic 
pracdial servitudes,' unlike later ones, could be created by 

470 



TABLE VII 

6 

Roads subject to servitude or easement : 

Gaius : According to the Law of the Tivelve Tables the 
width of a road « extends to eight feet where it runs 
straight ahead, sixteen ' in anfractum,' round a bend, 
that is, where it winds, 

7 

Festus : ' Roadways ' . . . — 

' Persons shall mend roadway. If they keep it 
not laid with stones, holder of servitude may 
drive beasts where he shall wish.^ 



8a-b 

Damage caused by water : «' 

Pomponius, on 'videbitur' in the sense of ' videri poterit': 
On this principal also were the following words of the Law of 
the Tivelve Tables exj^lained by the ancients — 

^^ If rain-water does damage, 

that is, if it may possibly do damage. 

Cicero : ' Damaging rain-water ' . . . must be restrained 
accordino- to an arbitrator's order.'* 



mancipation as well as by other means, being classed as res 
mancipi. For the old Roman mind laid emphasis on, e.g., 
the actual road or watercourse. 

** He may leave the road. Cf. note a. 

" The purport of the law was that an owner must not make 
such alterations on his land as will hinder drainage or any 
other natural flow of water from a neighbour's land to his. 

"^ Cicero gives the law of his own day, but the ruling by an 
arbiter seems to go back to the Tivelve Tables. Cp. p. 435. 



THE TWELM'. TABLES 

Taulus? ap. Di(j., XLIII, 8, 5: ^^ Si per publicum 
locum rivus aquae duetus private nocebit, erit actio 
privato ex Lege XII Tabiilaruin ut noxa domino sarciatur. 

Cp. Ulp., Duj., XXXIX, 3, 6, 5. 

9a-b 

Ulpianus, ap. Duj., XLTII, 27, 1, 8: Quod ait praetor et 
Lex XII Tabularutu efficere voluit, ut '-"'^XX' pedes altius- 
rami arboris cireumcidaiitur, et hoc idcirco effectuni est ne 
umbra arboris vicino praedio noeeret. 

Pomponius, ap. Dig., XLIII, 27, 2 : ^'^ Si arbor ex vicini 
fundo vento inclinata in tuum fundum sit, ex Lege XII 
Tabularum de adimenda ea . . . agere potes. 

Cp. Paul., Sent., V, G, 13; Fcst., 524, 16. 



10 

Plinius, N.H., XVI, 15 : Glande opes nunc quoque multarum 
gentium etiam pace gaudentium constant . . . cautum est 
I)raeterea Lege XII Tabularum ut glandem in alicnum 
fundum procidentem liceret colligere. 



Tab. VII, 11-12 Bruns, vide s., pp. 458-9. 

° It will be seen that the rights, mentioned here and in the 
next quotations, concerning trees and fruits, were secured by 
the Tables through actiones; but later they were protected 
by praetors' edicts (interdicts). The praetor's edicts were the 
means whereby the body of Roman law constantly grew. 

^ The purport of this is that a man may cause the owner of 
the tree to cut off the branches up to at least 15 feet from 
the ground. Some (Kiiblcr, Gesch. d. Rom. Rechts, 42) think 
only branches over 15 feet above ground are meant. 

472 



TABLE \'II 

Paulus ? : ^^ If a water-course directed through a 
pubUc place shall do damage to a private person, the 
same shall have right of suit by the Law of the Twelve 
Tables to the effect that damage shall be repaired for 
OM'ner. 

9a-b 

Damage caused by trees : 

Ulpian : The praetor " states what the Laio of the Twelve 
Tables also meant to effect, namely that the ^^ branches of 
a tree may be lopped off all round to a height of 
more than ^ 15 feet ; and this was done in order that shade 
from the tree might not damage a neighbouring estate. 

Pomponius : ^^ Should a tree on a neighbour's farm 
be bent crooked by the wind and lean over your 
farm, you may, by the Law of the Tw>elve Tables, talce legal 
action for removal of that tree.^ 



10 

Fruits fallen outside a man's property : 

PUny : Fruit ^ is the substance of which the wealth of many 
tribes even now consists, although they enjoy the blessings of 
peace . . . moreover a provision of the La^v of the Ticelve Tables 
was made that a man might gather up fruit that was 
falling: down on to another man's farm. 



" oratleast of the offending part of it. The verbs used were, 
if part of the tree w^ere removed, ' sublucare,' to let light 
in from below ; if the whole tree were removed, ' conlucare,' 
' to let full light in.' 

^ glans, acorn, included all fruits, or at any rate fruits with 
some kind of stone or kernel. 

473 



THE -nVELVE TABLES 

Tabula VIII 

la 

Cicero, de Rep., IV, 12 (Aug. de Civ. Dei, 2, 9) : Nostrae 
. . . XII Tabulae cum perpaucas res capite sanxissent, in 
his banc quoque sanciendam putaverunt : Si quis occenta- 
visset sive carmen condidisset, quod infamiam faceret 
flagitiumve alteri , . . 

Cornutus, ad Pers., 8., I, 137 : Cautum est ut fiistibus 
feriretur qui publice invehebatur. 

Festus, 196, 12 : ' Oecentassit ' antiqui dicebant quod nunc 
convicium fecerit dicimus. 

Cp. Cic, Tusc. Disp., IV, 2, 4 ; Hor., S., II, 1, 82 et Porphvr., 
ad loc; Hor., Ep., II, 1, 152; Paul., Sent., V, 4, 6; Arnob., 
Adv. Gentes, IV, 34. 

lb 

Plinius, N.H., XXVIII, 17 : Xon . . . legum ipsarura in 
XII Tabulis verba sunt . . . ? — 

^^ Qui malum carmen incantassit . . . 

^'^ = 16 Bruns 

^* = la Bruns cum 25 coniunx. Dirksen, SchoeU 



" Iniuriae were contumelious wrongs which might cause 
loss of reputation ; the word iniuria covers in Roman Law 
not only assault and battery, but also libel and similar wrongs, 
and also wrongs which in our laws are crimes. 

^ The quotations from Festus and Pliny given below 
indicate that the actual wording of the enactment was 
' Siquis oecentassit . . . condissit . . . faciat.' The severity 
of the penalty indicates that the Romans looked on this offence 
not as a private delict but a breach of the public ])eace. It 
may be that by occenlare any slanderous utterance by word of 
mouth, in prose or verse, was meant (cp. Festus again), and 
by carmen condere the publishing of a written libel; or 
orcentare may mean *to practise witchcraft.' Cf. next notes. 

474 



TABLE VIII 

Table VIII 

Torts " or Delicts 

la 

Slanderous and libellous songs : 

Cicero : Our Twelve Tables, though they ordained a capital 
penalty for very few wrongs, among these capital crimes did 
see fit to include the following ofi'ence : If any person had 
sung or composed against another person a song such 
as was causing slander or insult to another . . .^ 

Cornutus : It was laid down that, if anyone was found to be 
uttering in public a slander, <= he should be clubbed to 
death. 

Festus : ' Occentassit ' ('shall have sung against ') is a term 
which was used by the ancients for our present expression 
' convicium fecerit,' ' shall have committed insult.' 

lb 

Magical incantations against persons : 

Pliny : Do not the following words belong even to our laws 
in the Twelve Tables . . . ?— 

1^ Person who shall have enchanted singing evil 
spell . . .^ 

Slander and libel are not distinguished from each other in 
Roman law. 

<= or, if the utterance was to be read, ' libel ' ; the method 
would be apparently by defamatory verses as indicated by 
Cicero quoted above, but from Cornutus' words we could 
deduce that the Tables included in their wording an enactment 
against any spoken slander, or written libel, in prose or verse. 
Cf. preceding note. 

^ not the famosum carmen dealt with just above, though, 
from the magical meaning in incantare here and in excantare 
in fr. 8a, we might conclude that there is some magical idea in 
occentare also (fr. la). PUny is speaking of the alleged power 
in incantations. Ermein, Nouv. Rev. Hist., June, 1902, 352. 

475 



THE l^ELVE TABLES 
2-4 

Festus, 550, 3 : ' Talionis ' mentionem fiori in XII ait 
Verrius hoc luodo — 

- Si membrum rupsit, ni cum eo pacit, talio esto. 

Cp. Gell., XX, 1, 14; Fest., 356, 3 ? ; Gai., Inst., Ill, 223; 
Paul., Sent., V, 4, 6; Prise, ap. G.L., VI, 254, 12 K. lustinian., 
Inst., IV, 4, 7. 

Paulus, Coll. M. el R., II, 5, 5 : Iniuriariim actio aut 
legitiina est aut honoraria. Legitima ex lege XII Tabularum : 
Qui iniuriam alteri facit, V et XX [sestertiorum] poenam subit. 
Quae lex generahs fuit ; fuerunt et speciales velut — 

^ Manii fustive si os fregit <(collisitve) libero CCC, 
si servo CL poenam subito [sestertiorum]. 

Gellius, XX, 1, 12: Ita de iniuria poenienda [in XII) 
scriptum est — 

* Si iniuriam [alteri] faxsit, XX\^ [aeris] poenae 
sunto. 

Cp. Gai., Inst., Ill, 223; lustinian., Inst., IV, 4, 7; Gell., 
XYl, 10, 8; Fest., 561, 24. 



• rupsit T rapserit vel sim. Fest. cdd. (apogr.) rupit 
Gell., Frisc. e pacto cdd. Gell. in eum e p. Conti 

^ manu fustive si os L manifestos cdd. collisitve addidi 
coll. Gai., Inst., Ill, 223 : jiropter os vero fractum aut collisum 
trecentorum assimn poena est poena sunto Huschke 

* alteri seclud. Schoell faxit, alteri Huschke aeris 
seclud. Pithoeus poinas Breal 



" any organ — arm. leg. eye, and so on, incurable maiming 
of which was worse than breaking a bone (see below); for a 
bone could be mended. 

'' Thus the injured person or his next of kin (cf. Prise, ap. 
G.L., VI, 254, 13 K) may maim limb for limb. 

476 



TABLE VllI 
2-4 

Grievous bodily harm ; and other ' iniuriae ' ; 

Festus : ' Talio.' Mentioned, according to Verrius, in the 
Twelve in the following manner — 

2 If person has maimed another's limb,^ let there 
be retaliation in kind ^ unless he makes agree- 
ment for composition with him. 

Paulus : Action for grievous harm may be either one 
created by law or one created out of magisterial edicts/ The 
action by law is derived from a law of the Twelve Tables : the 
person who does harm to another undergoes a penalty of 25 
pieces.*^ This law dealt with ' iniuria ' in the general sense. 
There were also enactments providing for separate kinds of 
' inuria,' for example — 

^ If he has broken or bruised freeman's bone with 
hand or club, he shall undergo penalty of 300 
pieces ; ^ if slave's, 150. 

GeUius : The following are the words written (in the Twelve 
Tables) about punishment of ' iniuria ' — 

* If he has done simple harm [to another], penalties 
shall be 25 pieces./ 

<^ iu-s honorariinn was law based on praetors' edicts. 

'^ asses Ubrales, since se-sterliorum in Paulus' paraphrase 
is a later misinterpretation or mistaken alteration of the 
wording, or an addition to the wording of this law of the Tables, 
from which actual words are quoted by GelHus as given below. 

« see note d. Cf. C. Appleton, La Monnaie Rom. et I. XII 
T., 8. 

^ These words come from the enactment by which, as Gains 
says, the penalty for all other ' injuries ' (that is, other than 
breaking or bruising hmb or bone which Gains has just 
mentioned) was 25 asses. The word iniuria here means 
probably hurt done by mild blows. This enactment may have 
preceded the one dealing with the results of more serious 
blows. 

477 



THE TWELVE TABLES 



Fcstus, 356, 3 : llupsit in XII sigiiificat damnum dederit. 
Cp. Ulp., Dig., IX, 2, 1, pr. 

6 

Ulpianus, ap. Dig., IX, 1, 1: Si quadriipes pauperiem 
fecisse dicetur, actio ex Lege XII Tabulanim desecndit, 
quae lex voluit aut dari id quod nocuit, id est id animal 
quod noxiam commisit, aut aestimationem noxiae offerri. 

Cp. Paul., ex Fest., 276, 16; 184, fin.; Dig., IX, 1, 11; 
Justinian., Inst., IV, 9, pr. 

7 

Ulpianus, ap. Dig., XIX, .5, 14, 3 : Si glans ex arbore tua 
in fundum meum cadat, eamque ego imraisso pecore depaseam, 
. . . neque ex Lege XII Tabularum de pastu pecoris, 
quia non in tuo pascitur, neque de pauperie . . . agi posse. 

8a-b 

Plinius, N.H., XXVIII, 17 : Xon . . . ct legarum ipsarum 
in XII Tabulis verba sunt ? — 

8* Qui fruges excantassit . . . 

Fest., 356 : Rupsit as<sem (rupitias cd. rupsit S) dole 
malo in coni. Ha vet rupitia Paul. rupitias vel ruptias 
<issit> in XII coni. Linds. 

" Not, apparently, quoted from law 2 given above; but 
the reading and meaning are uncertain. It seems best to 
connect the fr. \\'ith damage to property. Ha vet, in Bibl. 
de VEc. des H. Etudes, 274 (1914), p. 11, in suggesting hero 
rupsit as<(sem malo}, would apply the expression to a 
bankrupt, who ' breaks the unit ' {as) or sum-total of his 
debts by paying part only. This may be right, but we must 
not attribute to the Tivelve Tables any law of bankruptcy 
like Caesar's or the modern law. 

** a sjjecial term for damage done by an animal. 

' Note that the Tables contained various enactments for 
particular sorts of damage done to immovable property. If 

478 



TABLE VIII 



Festus : ' Rupsit ' shall have broken or maimed in the 
Twelve Tables means ' shall have caused loss.' ^ 



Hann done by an animal : 

Ulpian : If a four-footed animal shall be said to have 
caused ' pauperies,' * loss, legal action for the same is 
derived from the Law of the Twelve Tables.'^ This Law 
sanctioned either the surrender of the thing ^ which 
damaged, that is the animal which committed the damage, 
or else the offer of assessment for the damage. 



Ulpian : If fruit should fall from j'our tree into my estate, 
and I cause feeding off such fruit by letting cattle onto it, 
... no legal action can be taken by the Law of the Twelve 
Tables either under the enactment on the pasturing of cattle, 
for it is not on your land that it is being pastured, or under the 
enactment on loss caused by an animal.^ 

8a-b 

Magical enchantment of another's crops : 

Pliny : Do not the following words belong even to our laws 
in the Twelve Tables ? 

^'^ Person who has enchanted crops away . . J 

there was any general enactment, it thus probably applied 
to movable property only. 

^ The Tables perhaps here used the expression noxam 
dedere ' to surrender the guilty thing ' ; though noxa and 
noxia were both used for ' hurt, harm,' noxa was used also for 
'harm-doer,' 'offender,' for instance, when the delinquent 
was a slave or a child ; see below, pp. 508-9. 

« For this, see preceding fr. 

f not apparently into one's own fields, but to destroy them 
where they stood. Fruges here may mean hanging fruits. 

479 



THi: tw]<:lm: tables 

Servius, ad Verg., EcL, VIIT, 99 : ' Traduccre messes,' 
lyfagicia quibusdam artibus hoe fiebat, unde est in XII Tab. — 

8^ neve alienam segetem pellexeris. 

Cp. Sen., N.Q., IV, 7; Apulei., AjwL, 47; Augustin., de 
Civ. Dei, VIII, 19. 

9 

Plinius, N.H., XVIII, 12 : Frugem quidera aratro 
quaesitam furtim noctu pavisse ac secuisse piiberi 
XII Tabulis capital erat, suspensumque Cereri necari 
iubebant, gravius quam in homicidio convictum ; impubem 
[praetoris] arbitratu verberari noxiamve diiplione de- 
cidi. 

Cp. Gell., XI, 18, 8. 

10 

Gaius (ad XII Tab.), ap. Dig., XLXU, 9, 9 : Qui aedes 
acervumve frumenti iuxta domum positum conibus- 
serit, vinctus verberatus igiii necari iubetur, si modo 
sciens prudensque id commiserit ; si vero casu id est 
neglegentia, aut noxiam sarcire iubetur, aut si minus 

^^ fortasse pellexerit 

Plin. : duplione decidi Schoell noxaeve duplioneni 
Lips noxiamqiie duplione ed. 1685 (Hardouin) dupli- 
onemve decerni aid. (duplione decerni cd. Luc.) 

" into one's own fields ; read perhaps pellexerit, because in 
the Twelve Tahle.s the commands and prohibitions are always 
in the 3rd person. The attempts at decoying were made by 
means of magical incantations. 

'' that is, crucified on a tree. We do not know what the 
old penalty for homicide was. 

" The goddess of crops. The Tables probably used the 
term sacer (dedicated to, solemnly forfeited to) here. 
See below, pp. 490-1 . 

"^ At the time of the Tables, a consul, who in the Tables 
may have been called praitor ; on this, see pp. 436, 509. 

480 



TABLE VIII 

Servius, on ' transfer harvests ' in Virgil : This used to be done 
by certain magical arts ; whence the enactment in the Twelve 
Tables— 

^^ or decoy ^ not another's corn. 

9 

Stealing crops : 

Pliny : For pasturing on, or cutting secretly by night, 
another's crops acquired by tillage, a capital punishment 
was laid down in the Tivelve Tables in the case of the adult 
malefactor, and their injunction was that he be hanged^ 
and put to death as a sacrifice to Ceres,'^ condemned to 
suflFer a penalty heavier than the penalty imposed in the crime 
of murder ; and that in the case of a person under the age 
of puberty, at the discretion of the [praetor,] ^ either 
he should be scourged, or for the harm done, com- 
position be made by paying double damages. 

10 

Arson : 

Gains : It is ordained that any person who destroys by 
burning any building or heap of corn deposited along- 
side a house shall be bound, scourged, and put to 
death by burning at the stake provided that he has 
committed the said misdeed with malice aforethought ; 
but if he shall have committed it by accident, 
that is, by negligence, it is ordained that he repair 
the damage,'^ or, if he be too poor to be competent 
for such punishment, he shall receive a lighter 

* Here is one of the enactments in which the word used 
by the Tables was ' sarcito.' Festus (quoted on p. 482); 
" ' Sarcito ' (he must repair) in the Twelve, according to 
Servius Sulpicius, means he shall pay, make good, the 
damage." 

481 
VOL. III. I I 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

idoneus sit levius castigatur. Appellatione autem aediuin 
omnes species aedificii continentur. 

Cp. Gloss, cd. Leid. Voss. fol, 82 — noxam sarcito damnum 
solvito ; Fest., 474, 14. Sarcito in XII Ser. Sulpicius ait sig- 
nificare damnum solvito, praestato. 

11 

Plinius, N.H., XVII, 7 : Fuit et arborum cura legibus 
priscis, cautumque est XII Tabulis ut, qui iniuria cecidisset 
alienas, lueret in singulas aeris XXV. 

Cp. Gai., Inst., IV, 11; Paul., Dig., XLVII, 7, 1; XII, 2, 
28, 6 (si iuraverit se non succidisse, sive Lege XII Tab. de 
arboribus succisis . . .); Gell., XVI, 10, 8. 



12 

Macrobius, S., I, 4, 19 : Non esse ab re puto hoc in loco id 
quoque admonere, quod decemviri in XII Tabulis inusitatis- 
sime ' nox ' pro ' noctu ' dixerunt. Verba haec sunt — 

12 Si nox furtum factum sit, si im occisit, iure 
caesus esto. 

In quibus verbis id etiam notandum quod, ab eo quod est 
' is,' non ' eum ' casu accusativo, sed ' im ' dixerunt. 

Cp. Gell., VIII, 1 ; XX, 1, 7. 

13 

Cicero, pro Ttillio, fr, 21, 50: Fureni, hoc est praedonem 
et latronem, luci occidi vetant XII Tabulae. . . . Nisi se 
telo defendit, inquit; etiamsi cum telo venerit, nisi 
utetur telo eo ac repugnabit, non occides. Quod si 

'- faxit Cuiacius factum sit cdd. esit v. cscit edd. 
482 



TABLE VIII 

chastisement. In the term * acdes ' is included every kind 
of buildings. 

11 

Felling another's trees : 

Pliny : Trees also received care and attention in ancient 
law, and provision was made in the Twelve Tables that any 
person who had cut down'* another person's trees ^ 
with harmful intent should pay 25 «5-pieces for 
every tree. 

12 

Theft by night ; theft by day ; killing a thief : 

MacTobius : It is not, I think, beside the argument at this 
point to inform you further that the Board of Ten employed in 
the Tivelve Tables the very unusual term ' nox ' for ' noctu ' 
in the following clause — 

^2 If theft '^ has been done by night, if owner kill 
thief, thief shall be held lawfully killed. 

In this clause you must notice this also that as the accusa- 
tive case masculine of ' is ' they used not ' eum ' but ' im.' 

13 

Cicero : The Twelve Tables forbid that a thief (that is, 
a robber or a footpad) be killed by day. . . . TheZaw says 
Unless he defend himself with weapon ; even though 
he has come with weapon, unless he shall use weapon 
and fight back, you shall not kill him. And even if 

" In the Tables the word used was succidere, ' undercut.' 
* that is to say, vines in particular, as Gains tells us in 
hist., IV, 11; he speaks there of a man who lost his case 
because he called his vines ' vines ' instead of ' trees.' 

<= In the Tables, furtum is probably simply the removal of 
an article ; later on the term was extended to include misusing 
anyone's property in various ways. Read here perhaps faxsit. 
Note that besides im we find em also for eum (see above, p. 424). 

483 

ii2 



THE TWEL\ J<: TABLES 

repugnat, endo plorato, hoc est conclamato, ut aliqui 
audiant et conveniant. 

Cp. Cic, pro TuIL, 20, 47 ; Fest., 444, 30 ; Gai., ap. Dig., IX, 
2, 4, 1; XLVII, 2, 55 (54), 2; L, 16, 233, 2; GcU., XI, 18, 
6; UIp., Coll., VII, 3, 2; Cic, pro Milom, 3, 9. 

14 

Gellius, XT, 18, 8 : Ex ceteris autem manifestis furibus 
liberos verberari addlcique iusserunt (sc. decemviri) el 
cui furtum factum est, si modo id luci fecissent 
neque se telo defendissent ; servos item furti mani- 
festi prensos verberibus adfici et e saxo praecipitari ; 
sed pueros impuberes [praetoris] arbitratu verberari 
voluerunt noxiamque ab his factam sarciri. 

Cp. Pliii., XVIII, 12; Gell., XX, 1, 7; Gai., Inst., Ill, 189. 

15a-b 

Gellius, XVI, 10, 8 : Petimus. . . . XII Tabulas legi 
arbitrere. . . . Cum ' proletarii ' et ' adsidui ' . . . furto- 
rumque quaestio cum — 

1^* lance et licio 

i^" = 156 Bruns 

" That is the slayer must call out lest he be deemed a 
murderer Irj'ing to hide his OAvn act. This applied to both 
day and night. Our sources leave it uncertain whether the 
law forbade killing of thief by day unless he defended himself 
with weapon, or permitted kilhng if he so defended himself. 

* Gains, Inst., Ill, 189 says it is not certain whether the 
thief became a slave or was in the position of an adiudicatus, 
who had been seized by a creditor by vianus inieclio, and 
might be liable to death, or slavery abroad (cp. pp. 436, 441, 
above). 

^ That is, the Tarpeian Rock on the Capitoline Hill. 

^ At the time of the Tables, a consul's discretion. 

484 



TABLE VIII 

he resists, first call out,'^ that is, raise a shout, so that some 
persons may hear and come up. 

14 

Penalties for thieves caught in the act : 

Gellius : But in the case of all other thieves caught 
in the act, the Board of Ten ordained that, if they were 
freemen, they should be flogged and adjudged ^ to 
the person against whom the theft had been com- 
mitted, provided that the malefactors had committed 
it by day and had not defended themselves with a 
weapon ; again, they ordained that slaves caught in the 
act of theft should be flogged and thrown from the 
Rock ; '^ but as for boys under the age of puberty, they 
saw fit that these should, at the [praetor's] ^ discretion, 
be flogged and that the damage done by them should 
be repaired. 

15a-b 

Search for stolen property : 

Gellius : We beg . . . you to beheve that . . . the Tivelve 
Tables are being read . . . Since the terms ' proletarii ' and 
' assidui ' {see above, pp. 426-7) . . . and investigation — • 

1^* with platter and loin-cloth ^ 

* Any one. who suspected that stolen goods of his were 
hidden in another's house could go alone and search, entering 
naked (lest he be deemed later to have brought, hidden in his 
clothing, any article which he might then pretend to have 
found in the house) except for a licium or narrow girdle, and 
holding before his face a perforated lajix or platter of any 
material, probably in order to put on it the stolen articles 
when found. Cf Gai., Inst., Ill, 192-3. (Fcstus says, less 
probably, in order not to be recognised by women.) Cf. 
Muirhead, Appendix, 413-416. In this passage of Gellius 
quaestio is always taken in the normal sense of official investiga- 
tion or trial. But it appears to me that we can take it in the 
old and original sense of ' search ' or in both senses united. 

485 



THE TWEIA'1< TABLES 

evanuerint . . . stiidium. scientiamque ego praestare debeo 
iuris et leguin vocumque earuni quibus utimur. 

Cp. Paul., ex F., 83, 24; Gell., XVI, 10, 8; Gai., Inst., HI, 
192-3. 

Gellius, XI, 18, 9 : Ea quoque furta quae per lancem 
liciumque concepta essent, proinde ac si manifesta forent, 
vindicaverunt. 

Gaius, Inst., HI, 191 : ^^b Concepti et oblati (sc. furti) 
poena ex Lege XII Tabularum tripli est eaque similiter a 
praetore servatur. 

Cp. Gai., Inst., IIL 186-7. 



16 

Festiis, 162, 14: 'Nee' . . . pro ' non,' ut et in XII 
est ... — 

1^ Si adorat furto, quod nee manifestum erit, 
<(duplione damnum deeidito.) 

Cp. Paul., ex Fest., 19, 8; Gai., Inst., Ill, 190; Gell., XI, 
18, 15; Cato, E.R., I, 1. Cf. Dig., II, 14, 7, 14 et de furto 
pacisci lex (sc. XII Tab. ?) permittit. 



15& ~ 153 Bruns 

^^ duplione damnum deeidito add. coll. Gai., Inst., Ill, 190 
. . poena diqjli inrogatur), Gell., XI, 18, 15 (. . . poenam 
. . dupli). Cat., B.R., I, 1. esit Raevard. escit Charondas 



" Penalty for prevention of search was not instituted until 
after the time of the Tables. 

'' i.e. convicted culprit was found guilty of furttim mani- 
festum. See law 14, pp. 484-5. 

" Instead of search lance el licio, a man could institute a 
search in normal dress, but only in the presence of witnesses ; 
if in this case stolen goods were found, the thief, when con- 

486 



tablp: Mil 

have disappeared , . . the only interest and knowledge which 
it is my duty to show must be concerned with the jurisprudence 
and laws and such phraseology of lawsuits as we use now. 

Penalties " in connexion tvith discovery of stolen goods : 
Gellius : Those thefts also which had been discovered 
through use of platter and loin-cloth they punished 
just as if the culprits had been caught in the act.^ 

Gaius : ^^^ For cases of ' discovery ' {by other means than 
platter and loin-cloth — seep. 485) or ' introduction '^ of stolen 
goods ' the penalty, by the Law of the Twelve Tables, is triple 
damages ; and that penalty is retained by the praetor likewise. 



16 

Thieves not caught in the act : 

Festus : ' Nee ' . . . for ' non,' as, e.g., in the Twelve Tables — 

1^ If person pleads on case of theft in which thief 
shall be not caught in act, thief must com- 
pound for loss by paying double damages.*^ 



victed, was condemned to pay three times their amount for 
furtum conception (detected theft). But if the accused house- 
holder could prove, after either method of search, that a 
person other than himself had (from malice or any other 
reason) put the articles in his house, he obtained damages of 
three times their amount for furtum oblatum (as it were 
' planted theft '). Search lance et licio became obsolete; 
search in presence of witnesses survived. 

'^ Apparently double in kind, not in value (for example, 
2 cows for 1 cow stolen — Jolowicz, Cambridge Legal Essays, 
1926, 203 ff.). The penalty is supplied in Festus' text from 
other sources. If the passage from the Digest (c^uoted here), 
saying that the law allows settlement by agreement in matters 
of theft, refers to the Twelve Tables, we might add, before 
dupliane, ni pacit, ' unless he makes agreement,' or the 
like, adorat may mean accuses here. 

487 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

17 

Gaius, Inst., II, 45: Furtivaiii {sc. rem) LexXIITabul- 
arum usu capi prohibet. 

Cp. lustinian., Inst., IT, 0, 2 ; lulian., ap. Dig., XLI, 3, 33, pr. 

18 

Tacitiis, Ann., VI, 16 : Vetus iirbi fenebre malum et 
scditionum discordianimque creberrima causa, eoque cohibe- 
batur antiquis quoque et minus corruptis moribus. Nam 
primo XII Tabulis sanctum ne quis iinciario fenore 
ampliiis exerceret, cum antea ex libidine locupletium 
agitaretur. 

Cato, 7?. 7?,, I, 1 : Maiores nostri sic habuerunt et ita in 
legibus posiverunt furem dupli condemnari feneratorem 
quadrupli. 

19 

Paulus, Sent., II, 12, 11 : Ex causa depositi Lege XII 
Tabularum in duplum actio datur. 

20a-b 

lustinian., Inst., I, 26, pr. ^Oa (^g suspectis tutoribus et 
curatoribus) : Sciendum est suspecti crimen e Lege XII 
Tabularum descendere. 

Tryphoninus, ap. Dig., XXVI, 7, 55 : ^os Si ipsi tutores rem 
pupiUi furati sunt, videamus an ea actione quae proponitur 

" by thief or receiver (through purchase or other method) 
of the stolen article ; the law does not refer to the thief only. 

^ At the time of the Tivelve Tables the material lent was 
apparently not money, but goods or uncoined weighed copper. 

' The ujicia was the imit of division in the as, and was used 
also as i^jth of anything. Here unciarium Jenus seems to be 
i\vth of the principal paid yearly as interest — that is 8§% per 
annum. Cf. Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early 
Latin, [)i), 52!)-531. Perhaps yV% per month = 1% per annum. 

488 



TABLE VIII 

17 
Usucapio of stolen property is disalloiced : 

Gaius : A stolen thing is debarred from usucapio " 
by the Laiv of the Twelve Tables. 

18 

Usury : 

Tacitus : Of old standing was the trouble caused to the city 
by lending money ^ at interest; it was a very frequent cause 
of civil strife and discord. For that reason attempts were 
made to check it even at the time when the good old morality 
was less corrupt than it is now; for first the Twelve Tables 
ordained that no person should practise usury at a rate 
more than one twelfth,*^ whereas, before that, the practice 
was carried on according to the free choice of the wealthy. 

Cato : Our ancestors . . . followed this principle and em- 
bodied it in their laws : a thief is condemned for double, a 
usurer is condemned for quadruple amount. 

19 

Einhezzlement of deposit ; malpractices of trustees and 
guardians : 

Paulus : Arising out of a case concerning an article 
deposited,'^ the Law of the Twelve Tables grants action 
for double damages. 

20a-b 

Justinian, -^^ on guardians and trustees who are sus- 
pected : We should be aware that the right to accuse these 
on suspicion ^ is derived from the Laiv of the Ttvelve Tables. 

Tryphoninus : ^^^ If guardians have themselves embezzled 
property of a ward, let us see if, in the action which is avail - 

^ sc. with a person who has failed to return the article. 
The action granted was clearly delictual; for deposit by 
independent contract was not known until much later than 
the Tables. 

* sc. of negligence or maladministration. 

489 



THE TWFXVK TABLES 

ex Lege XII Tabiilarum adversus tutores in dupluni, 
singuli in solidum teneantur. 

Cp. Ulp., ap. Dig., XXVI, 10, I, 2; Cic, de Off., Ill, 15, 61 ; 
de Or., I, 36, 166-7. 

21 

Servius, ad Aen., VI, 609 : ' Fraus innexa clienti.' Ex Lege 
XII Tabularum venit, in quibus scriptum est — 

21 Patronus si clienti fraudem faxit, sacer esto. 
Cp. Gell., XX, 1, 40; Plut., Rom., 13. 

22 

Gellius, XV, 13, 11 : Confessi autem aeris, de quo facta 
confessio est, in XII Tabidis scriptum est ... ex isdem 
Tabulis id quoque est^ — 

22 Qui se sierit testarier liV)ripensve fuerit, ni 

testimonium fariatur, improbus intestabi- 
lisque esto. 
Cp. GeU., VII, 7, 2, 3; lustinian., Inst., II, 10, 6. 

23 

Gellius, XX, 1, 53 : An putas, Favorine, si non ilia etiani ex 
XII Tabulis de testimoniis fiilsis poena abolevisset et si 
nunc quoque, ut antea, qui falsum testimonium dixisse 
convictus esset, e saxo Tarpeio deiceretur, raentituros 
fuisse pro testimonio tam multos quam videmus ? 

21 esto <Diti patri) Morams. faxit IMorula fecerit 

22 fatiatur Schoell fateatur T 



" Originalh' a religious penalty (of. Cereri necari above, 
pp. 480-1) where the man was sacrificed. But sacer came to 
mean a man disgraced, outlawed, and deprived of his goods. 

^ in a manci patio (see above, pp. 428-9) when the trans- 

490 



TABLE VIII 

able by the Law of the Twelve Tables against guardians 
for double damages, each guardian is separately held liable 
for the whole sum of damages involved. 

21 

Frauds by patrons : 

Servius, on ' fraud contrived against client ' in Virgil : This 
comes from the La^v of the Ttoelve Tables, in which are written 
the following words — 

21 If patron shall have defrauded client, he must 

be solemnly forfeited. '^ 

22 

Duties of witnesses : 

Gellius : Moreover the expression ' confessi aeris ' (that is, 
debt of which admission has been made) is in the Twelve 
Tables written in these words : {see Table HI above, pp. 436-7) 
. . . Likewise from the same comes the following — 

22 Whosoever shall have allowed himself to be 

called as witness or shall have been scales- 
balancer,^ if he do not as witness pronounce 
his testimony, he must be deemed dis- 
honoured and incapable of acting as witness.'^ 

23 

Penalty for false witness : 

Gellius : Or do you think, Favorinus, that, if ever that 
memorable penalty derived from the Twelve Tables for false 
witness had not become obsolete, and if, now too as formerly, a 
person who had been found guilty of giving false 
witness, were hurled down from the Tarpeian Rock, liars 
in giving testimony would have been as many as we now see ? 



feree struck with a piece of copper a pair of scales held 
by a lihripens, a scales-balancer, scales-holder. 

'^ or, ' detestable ' ? Later, unfit to make or witness to a will. 

491 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

24 

Cicero, pro Tullio, 22, 51 : Lex est in XII Tabulis — 

2* Si telum manu fugit ma<(gis quam iecit) . . . 

Cicero, Top., XVII, 64 : lacere telum voluntatis est, ferire 
quern nolueris, fortunae. Ex quo aries subicitur ille in 
vestris actionibus, ' si telum manu fugit magis quam iecit.' 

Cp. Cic, de Or., Ill, 39, 158; August., de Lib. Arb., I, 4; 
Fest., 520, 2 ; 526, 8 ? ; lustinian., Inst., IV, 18, 5. 

25 

Gains (ad XII Tab.), ap. Dig., L, 10, 236: Qui venenum 
dicit, adicere debet utrum malum an bonum ; nam et medica- 
menta venena sunt. 

26 
Porcius Latro, Declam. in Caiil., 19 : XII Tabulis cautum 
esse cognoscimus ne quis in urbe coetus nocturnos 
agitaret. 

27 

Gains (ad XII Tab.), ap. Dig., XLVII, 22, 4 : Sodales 
sunt qui eiusdem collegii sunt quam Graeci iraipiav vocant. 
His autem potestatem facit lex (sc. XII Tabularum) 
pactionem quami velint sibi ferre dum ne quid ex 
publica lege corrumpant. Sed haec lex videtur ex lege 
Solonis translata esse. 

2^ ma<gis quam iecit) a^. Peyron ex Cic, Top., XVII, 64; 
addas porro post iecit : arietem subicito 



" Note that we do not know what the old penalty for 
homicide was; from Pliny, XVIII, 12 we know that it was 
less severe than the penalty for cutting another's corn by 
night (see above, pp. 480-1). 

'' Originally a peace-offering in order to stop blood-revenge, 
the offering of a ram was intended, in the Tables, to .stop 

492 



TABLE Mil 

24 

Accidental homicide by missile : 
Cicero : There is a law in the Twelve Tables — 
2* If missile has sped from hand, and holder has 
not aimed it * . . . 

Cicero : To aim or throw a missile is an act of the will ; to 
strike a person whom you did not wish to, an act of chance. 
Hence comes that well-known substitution of a ram ^ in 
your actions at law, ' if missile has sped from hand, and holder 
has not aimed it.' 

25 

Poisoniiu) : 

Gains : Whoever uses the term ' venenum,' drug, should add 
some expression to show whether it be noxious or beneficial ; 
for ' medicamenta,' medicines, also are included in ' venena.' 

26 

Nocturnal meetings not permitted : 

Porcius Latro : We learn in the Twelve Tables that provision 
was made that no person shall hold meetings by night 
in the city. 

27 

Associations permitted : 

Gains : ' Associates ' are persons who belong to the same 
' collegium,' guild, for which the Greeks use the term eVatpia. 
These are granted by a law {of the Twelve Tables) the right 
to pass any binding rule they like for themselves, 
provided that they cause no violation of public law. 
But this law appears to have been taken over from a law of 
Solon. 



prosecution for murder, which kinsmen of a murdered man 
were bound to institute. The ram was probably given to the 
agnates of the man killed. 

493 



1111-: TWELVE TABLES 

Tabula IX 

1-2 

Cicero, de Leg., Ill, 4, 11 : ^ ' Privilegia nc irroganto. 
2 De capite civis nisi per maximum comitiatum 
ollosque quos [censores] in partibus populi locassint ne 
ferunto.' 

Cicero, de Leg., ITT, 19, 44 : Turn leges praeclarissimae 
de XII Tabulis tralatae duac, quarum altera privilegia tollit, 
altera de capite civis rogari nisi maximo comitiatu vetat . . . 
Ferri de singulis maiores . . . nisi centuriatis coniitiis nolue- 
runt. 

Cp. Cic, pro Sest., 30, 65; De Damo, 17, 43; de Repub., II, 
36, 61 ; Pompon., Big., I, 2, 2, 23. 



Gellius, XX, 1, 7 : Dure . . . scriptum esse in istis legibus 
quid existimari potest? Ni duram esse legem putas quae 
iiidicem arbitrumve im-e datmii, qui ob rem dicendam 
pecuniam accepisse convictus est, capite poenitur. 



Pomponius, ap. Dig., I, 2, 2, 23 : Quia ut diximus de capite 
civis Romani iniussu populi non erat lege permissum con- 
sulibus ius dicere, propterea quaestores constituebantur e 
populo, qui de capitalibus rebus praeessent ; hi appellabantur 



** that is, all enactments, whether ' acts of parliament ' or 
other, referring to a single citizen, whether in his favour or not, 
except decisions on appeals against capital sentences. 

* that is, his person or privileges of citizenship. 

" the comitia ceniuriata which included all citizens. To 
this assembly a man tried on a capital charge must have 
right of appeal, ius provocationis. 

** This did not apply to the time of the Twelve Tables, 
because the creation of the first censors took place in 443 B.C. 

494 



TABLE IX 

Table IX 
Public Law 

1-2 

' Privilefjiu ' / cases ajjeclin<j ' caput ' ; 

Cicero : ^ Laws of personal exception ° must not 
be proposed ; ^ cases in which the penalty affects 
the ' caput ' * or person of a citizen must not be decided 
except through the greatest assembly ^ and through 
those whom the [censors]'^ have placed upon the 
register of citizens. 

Cicero : Then come two most excellent laws taken over from 
the Twelve Tables. Of these one abolishes laws of personal 
exception, the other forbids the introduction of proposals 
which concern the person of a citizen except at the greatest 
assembh'. . . . Our ancestors . . . did not desire that 
decisions affecting the fate of individuals should be made 
except at the assembly of the centuries. 

3 

Acceptance, by judge or arbiter, of a bribe : 

GeUius : What can be regarded as cruel among the enact- 
ments of those laws ? Unless you think a law is cruel which 
inflicts capital punishment on a judge or arbiter 
legally appointed, who has been found guilty of 
receiving a bribe for giving a decision. 

4 

Quaestores parricidii : 

Pomponius : Because, as we said, it had not been by law 
permitted to the consuls to deliver j ustice affecting the person 
of a Roman citizen without the sanction of the whole people, 
therefore were established ' quaestors,' chosen from the people, 
to have charge over capital cases; these were called ' quaes - 

Before that time the lists of citizens were superintended by 
the consuls. 

495 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

quaestores parricidii quorum etiam memiint Lex XII 
Tabularum. 

Cp. Fest., 344, 31. 

5 

Marcianus, ap. Dig., XLVIII, 4, 3 : Lex XII Tabularum 
iubet cum qui hostem concitaverit quive civem hosti 
tradiderit capite puniri. 



ISalvianus Massil., de Guhern. Dei, VIII, o, 24 : Interfici 
. . , indemnatum quemcumque hominem etiam XII 
Tabularum decreta vetuerunt. 



Tahda X 

1 

Cicero, de Leg., II, 23, 58 :— 

^ Hominem mortuum 

inquit lex in XII — 

in urbc ne sepelito neve urito ; 

credo vel propter ignis perioulum. Quod autem addit ' neve 
urito ' indicat non qui uratur sepeliri sed qui humetur. 



" these were in fact the original quaestors (created under 
the Kings), who later ceased to try criminal cases. From the 
first, cases of parricidiuvi were onlv a part of their duties. 

* cf. Huschke, Zeitschrift f. Rechtsgeschichte, XI, 1872, 

496 



TABLE X 

tores parricidii,' investigators of murder,'^ who are men- 
tioned even by the Law of the Twelve Tables. 

5 

Treason : 

Marcianus : The Law of the Tivelve Tables ordains that 
lie who shall have roused up a public enemy, or 
handed over a citizen to a public enemy, must 
suffer capital punishment. 

6 

Death-sentence on uncondemned is disallowed : 
Salvianus: Putting to death . . . of any man, who- 
soever he might be, unconvicted was forbidden by 
the decrees even of the Tivelve Tables. 



Table X ^ 
Sacred Law 

1 

No burial or cremation allowed in the city : 

Cicero : — 

^ A dead man 

says a law in the Twelve — 

shall not be buried or burned within the city ; 

I suppose the latter surely was because of the danger of fire. 
But this addition, by the law, of the word ' burned ' shows that 
being buried applies not to the man whose body is burned but 
only to the man who is interred, 

1138-42. As will be seen we can get from a Cicero the general 
outHne of part if not of the whole of this Table. 

497 

VOL. III. K K 



TIIK TWEL\ J: tables 

2-6c 

Cicero, de Ley., II, 23, 59 : lam cetera in XH minuendi 
sumptus sunt lamentationisque funebris, translata de .Solonis 
fere legibus — 

2 Hoc plus ne facito. Rogum ascea ne polito. 

Nostis quae sequuntur ; discebamus enim pueri XII ut carmen 
necessarium, quas iam nemo discit. Extenuato igitur 
sumptu — 

^ tribus riciniis et tunicla purpurea ct decern 
tibicinibus, 

tollit etiam lamentationem — 

^ Mulieres gcnas ne radunto, neve lessum funeris 
ergo habento. 

Hoc veteres interpretes Sex. Aelius L. Acilius non satis se 
intellegere dixerunt sed suspicari vestimenti aliquod genus 
funebris, L. Aelius ' lessum ' quasi lugubrem Hulationem, ut 
vox ipsa significat . . . (24) Cetera item funebria quibus 
luctus augetur XII sustulerunt : — 

^» Homini niortuo ne ossa legito quo post funus 
facial. 

^ vel reciniis 

^* homini inquit Cic. 



" carmen is often taken to imply, if not poetr}', yet rhythmic 
formulas, but Cicero seems to mean chanted ])rosc. The 
extant fragments of the Tables are apparently in prose, though 
eflForts have been made to find metric rhythms in them. 

* It is quite uncertain whether these words occurred in the 
Tables exactly as they stand here. 

498 



TABLE X 

2-6c 

Elaborate and costly funerals forbidden ; regulations about 
burial and tombs : 

Cicero : There are also the other enactments in the Twelve 
which demand the limitation of expense and wailing at 
funerals, and were taken over for the most part from the laws 
of Solon — 

2 One must not do more than this ; one must not 
smooth pyre with axe. 

You know what follows, for when we were boys we used to 
learn the Ticelve as a ditty " ordained by fate ; no one learns 
them now. Anyhow, having limited the expense to — 

^ three veils, one small purple tunic, and ten flute- 
players,^ 

it does away with wailing also — 

^ Women must not tear cheeks or hold chorus of 
' Alas ! ' on account of funeral. 

The old interpreters Sextus Aelius and Lucius Acilius confessed 
that they did not fully understand this w^ord ' lessum ' but 
suspected that some kind of mourning-garment was referred 
to, Lucius Aelius taking ' lessum ' to mean a sort of sorrowful 
outers^ which indeed this word seems to express . . . Again, 
the other funeral customs, by which sorrow is intensified, 
were abolished by the Twelve : — 

^* When man is dead one must not gather bones 
whereby to make funeral after.'' 

" This enactment forbids not the natural custom of 
collecting in an urn bones and ashes for or after burial or 
burning, nor re-collection for a second funeral (for this see 
below), but the common custom of prolonging mourning by 
gathering up and preserving unburied some part {os resect um) 
of the dead body. This part was later buried, and then only 
did mourning cease. Some Romans may have thought that 
burning might be wrong, or its ceremony inadequate. 

499 

KK 2 



THE twi:l\'e tables 

^^ J'Lxcipit bellicam peregrinamciue mortem. Haec 
praeterca sunt in legibus de unctura. . . . ^^ Scrvilis 
unctura tollitur omnisque circumpotatio ; quae et recte 
tolluntur ncque tollcrentur nisi fuisscnt — 

Ne sumptuosa rcspersio . . . ^^<Ne murrata 
potio) , . . ^ Ne longae coronae . . . Ne 
acerrae . . . 

Praetereantur. Ilia iam significatio est laudis ornamcnta ad 
mortuos pertinere, quod coronam virtute partam e. q. s. {vide 
p. 502). 

Cp. Cic, de Leg., II, 25, 64; Tusc. Disp., II, 23, 55; Plin., 
N.H., XI, 157; Serv., ad Aen., XII, 606; Fest., 374, 29; 
352, 14. 

7 

Plinius, N.H., XXI, 7 : Ad certamina in circum per ludos 
et ipsi descendebant et servos suos equosque mittebant. 
Inde ilia XII Tabularum lex — 

■^ Qui coronam parit ipse pecuniave eius virtutisve 
ergo arduitur ei . . . ; 

Cic, de Leg., II, 24, 60 : circumportatio cdd. deti. 

«« nee sumptuosa . . . nee longae c. . . . praetereuntur 
Bakius fortasse <vini> respersio r. <sit> ne Manutius 

^* <ne murrata potio> addidi coll. Fest., 154, 22, 'murrata 
j)otione usos antiquos indicia est quod . . . XII Tabulis 
cavetur ne mortuo indatur ' 

^'^ nee acerrae cdd. acerrae praeferantur ^Manutius 

' virtutis suae ergo Pintianus honoris virtutisve ergo, 
si arduuitur (ergo arguitur vel ergo duitur vel siin. cdd.) ci 
parcntique eius, se fraude esto Schoell pecuniave eius 
virtutisve ergo duuitur ei, <ast ei parentive eius mortuo domi 
forisve imponetur, se fraude esto) Momms, duitor Gron. 

" That is to say, if the dead person had died in war or in 
a foreign land, then a limb could be brought home and buried. 

^ unctura included also other attentions (like the sprinkling 
and so on quoted by Cicero below) besides anointing. 

500 



TABLE X 

^^ An exception is made by the Tmio in case of death 
in war or in a foreign land." The following provisions 
also are to be found in the Laws, referring to anointing . . . 

^* Anointing ^ by slaves is abolished, and every kind 
of drinking-bout also ; and rightly too are these abolished, 
and they would not stand abolished unless they had really 
existed — 

Let there be no costly sprinkling,*^ . . . ^^ (No 
myrrh-spiced drink) . . . ^° No long garlands 
. . . No incense-boxes . . . 

Let us pass these by. Clearly the point of all this is that it 
is only decorations bestowed as marks of honour that belong 
to the dead, for a garland won by valour is alloxced . . . {see 
next item, especially pp. 502-3, at top). 

7 
Pliny : During the games men used to go down themselves 
into the circus to take part in the contests, and they used 
also to send their slaves and horses. Hence that law of the 
Twelve Tables— 

^ \Mien man wins crown himself or through 
chattel ^ or by dint of valour crown is bestowed 
on him . . . ; ^ 

•^ Even sprinkling with wine was probably forbidden by 
the Tables : cf. Festus 352, 14 {vini respersio) and the law 
attributed to Numa — vitio roguvi ne respargito (Pliny, N.H., 
XIV, 88). ne murrata potio I have added here from Festus; 
he says that there was a provision in the Twelve Tables that 
this must not be thrown on a dead man. I take it that Cicero 
gives the first words only of several separate prohibitions. 
But he may be altering objects in the accusative case to 
subjects in the nominative, if not more than that. Longae 
coro7iae were almost what we call ' festoons.' 

•^ not money or wealth here, but a chattel — a slave or horse 
who wins a crown for the owner. 

' That is, when he is burnt or buried, as Pliny goes on to 
describe, it shall be with impunity. Skeletons crowned with 
gold have in fact been found in old Italian tombs. 

501 



THE r\Vi:LM: TABLES 

quani servi cquive mcruissent pecunia j)artam lege dici nemo 
dubitavit. 

Cicero, de Leg., II, 24, 60 : Coronam virtute partam et 
ei qui peperisset, et eiiis parcnti, sine fraude esse lex 
impositam iubet. 

8-11 
Cicero, de Leg., II, 24, 60 : Credoque, quod erat factitatum 
® ut uni pliira (s-c. funera) fierent lectique plures sterne- 
rentur id cjuoque ne fieret lege sanctum est. Qua in lege 
cum esset — 

neve aurum addito, 
quam humane excipit altera lex — 

^ At cut auro denies vincti escunt, ast im cum illo 
sepeliet uretve, se fraude esto. 

. . . Duae sunt praeterea leges de sepulcris, quarum altera 
privatorum aedificiis, altera ipsis sepulcris cavet. ^" Nam 
quod rogum bustumve novum vetat propius LX pedes 
adigi aedes alienas invito domino, incendium veretur 
acerbum. ^^ Quod autem forum, id est vestibulum sepulcri, 
bustumve usu capi vetat, tuetur ius sepulcrorum. 

Haec habemus in XII, sane secundum naturam, quae norma 
legis est. Reliqua sunt in more. 

8-11 = 8-10 Bruns. 

^ iuncti vel vincti cdd. escunt Lambinus essent cdd. 

" Yet we may well doubt this as applied merely to games. 
If it has any foundation it could apply only to the old ludi 
Romani, held in a circus, or to the earlier races (in connexion 
with a deit}') such as the Consualia, held at the nra Const, 
or the Eqiiirria, held in the Campus Martins. 

** another exception appears to be crowns of or containing 
gold — see above. 

« the area in front of a tomb, the fore-court. 

'' where also the ashes were buried. 

502 



TABLE X 

that it was a crown earned by the slaves or the horses which 
is said by the law to be won through his chattel has been 
doubted by no one." 

Cicero : A garland won by valour may, by an ordinance of 
the Law {of the Tivelve Tables) be deemed to have been laid 
with impunity on the man who won it and on his father. 

8-11 

Cicero : Further, it was because it had become a common 
practice, I suppose, ^ to make more than one funeral for 
one man and to make and spread more than one bier 
for him that it was sanctioned by a law that this also should 
not occur. And although in this law stands the prohibition — 

and person must not add gold, 

nevertheless see what kindly feeling is shown by the excep- 
tion * made by another law — 

® But him whose teeth shall have been fastened 
together with gold, if person shall bury or 
burn him along with that gold, it shall be with 
impunity. 

. . . Besides this there are two laws about tombs, of which 
one makes protection for buildings which belong to private 
owners, the other for the tombs themselves. ^^ For the 
provision which says : No new pyre or personal burning- 
mound must be erected nearer than 60 feet to 
another person's buildings without consent of owner 
— seems to suggest fear of disastrous fire. ^^ But the 
provision which says : 'the forum ^ (that is, the entrance - 
chamber of a tomb) and burning-place '^ must not be 
acquired by usucapio or long usage ' — protects the rights 
of tombs. 

These are the provisions which we find in the Twelve Tables, 
and they are certainly in accordance with nature, which is 
the standard of law. All our other rules rest on custom. 

Other enactments of Sacred Laic are included by modern scholars 
in Table XII. 



THE TWI:L\ E TABLES 
Tabula XI 



Cicero, de Rep., II, 36, 61-37, 63 : Decemviri . . . cum 
X Tabulas summa [legum] aequitate pnidentiaque con- 
scripsissent, in amium posterum decemviros alios subro- 
gaverunt, quorum non similiter fides nee iustitia laudata . . . 

(63) qui duabus tabulis iniquarum legum additis , 

etiam quae diiunctis populis tribui solent conubia, haec illi 
ut ne plebei cum patribiis essent, inhumanissima lege 
sanxerunt. 

Cp. Liv., IV, 4, 5; Dionys., X, 60, 5; Gai., Dig., L, 16, 238. 

2 

Macrobius, S., I, 13, 21 : Tuditanus refert libro III magi- 
stratuum decemviros, qui X Tabulis duas addidenint, de 
intercalando populum rogasse. 

Cp. Macrob., S., I, 13, 12, 15; Censorin., de Die Nat., 20, 6; 
Cels., Dig., L., 16, 98, 1. 

3 

Cicero, ad Att., VI, 1,8: E quibus unum loropiKov requiris 
de Cn. Flavio, Anni filio. Ille vero ante decemviros non fuit 
. . , Quid ergo profecit quod protulit fastos ? Occultatam 
putant quodam tempore istam tabulam, ut dies agendi 
peterentur a i)aucis. 

Cp. Liv., IX, 46, 5; Cic, pro Murena, 11, 25; Plin., X.IL, 
XXXIII, 17; Macrob., S., I, 15, 9. 

" This suggests that the second Board of Ten by law 
instituted a new or revised the old method of maintaining 
the year at an average length of 365^ days, according to the 
sun, by having a year of 355 days only and intercalating an 
additional month every other year. After each regular 
intercalation, the matter was entrusted to the pontifices, 
who tended to intercalate further at will. Thus there was a 
tendency for the calendar to frill into disorder; and the Tables 
may have tried to put this right. Besides this tradition of 
some step taken by the Ttcelve Tables, we have a tradition 



TABLE XI 

Table XI 
Supplemejitary Laws (i) 

1 

Intermarriage of patricians and 'plebeians : 

Cicero : When the Board of Ten had put into writing, using 
the greatest fairness and wisdom, ten tables of laws, they 
caused to be elected in their stead, for the next year, another 
Board of Ten, whose good faith and justice have not been 
praised to a Hke extent. . . . When they had added two tables 
of unfair laws, they ordained, by a very inhuman law, that 
intermarriage, which is usually permitted even between 
peoples of separate States, should not take place between 
our plebeians and our patricians. 

2 
Intercalation of the Calemlar : 

Macrobius : Tuditanus in his third book of Magistracies 
records that that Board of Ten, who added two tables to the 
existing ten, brought before the people a bill concerning 
intercalating into the calendar." 

3 

Cicero: In these books (sc. on the ^ Republic^) there is one 
point of history which you call in question, about Gnaeus 
Flavius, son of Annius. He did not flourish before the 
Boards of Ten . . . What good then did he do by publishing 
the calendar ? '^ It is thought that this table was kept hidden 
at one time in order that the days deemed favourable for 
official legal business might be available at the request of 
a few people only. 

about a previous effort made by a lex Pinaria of 472, which 
dealt with intercalatio. Cf. also next note. 

* This statement of Cicero impUes that in some fashion at 
least the Tioelve Tables published dies fasti (that is to say, a 
list of days on which the magistrate's court would be open) 
which had been until their time in the hands of the pontifices ; 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

rahnla XII 

1 

Gaius, Inst., IV, 28 : Lege introducta est pigiioris capio 
veluti Lege XTI Tabularum adversus eum qui hostiam 
emisset nee pretium redderet ; item adversus eum 
qui mereedem non redderet pro eo iumento quod 
quis ideo loeasset, ut inde pecuniam acceptam in 
dapem, id est in sacrificium, impenderet. 

Cp. Paul., ex Fest., 48, 1 ; Gai., Dig., L., 16, 238, 2. 

2a-b 
Ulpianus, ap. Dig., IX, 4, 2, 1 : Celsus . . . differentiam 
facit inter Legem Aquilliam et Legem XII Tabularum. Nam 
in Lege antiqua, si servus seiente domino furtum fecit . . . 
servi nomine aetio est noxalis ... — - 

2* Si servus furtum faxsit noxiamve noxit . . . 

2" noxit Pithoeus noeuit Ulp. 



but tradition maintains also that it was Flavins, about the 
year 304 B.C., much later than the Twelve Tables, who 
published the fasti. (Cic, jno Mur., 11, 25; Liv., IX, 46, 5; 
Macrob., S., I, 15, 9; Plin., N.H., XXXIII, 17; Val. Max., 
II, 5, 2; Diod. Sic, XX, 36.) The tabula which Cic. here 
says had been kept hidden would not it seems be a Table of 
the Twelve, but a table of dies fasti. But note that Livy 
(VI, 1) tells us that when, after the invasion of the Gauls 
in 390 (387?) B.C., the Twelve Tables were looked up, the 
pontifices suppressed the enactments which referred to sacra, 
being desirous of keeping a hold on the populace. Schoell's 
attribution of actual fixtures of dies fasti (restored from the 
extant ' Julian Fasti ') to the Twelve Tables, Table XI (which 
he believed to consist wholly of dies fasti) is, however, not 
acceptable. All we can say is that the Twelve Tables seem 
to have contained, possibly in connexion with intercalation as 
indicated above, a statute concerning dies fasti, whatever may 
have been the fate of this statute afterwards. 

" pignoris capio, ' taking of a j>ledge,' was seizure of an 
article of a debtor's property to induce him to pay the debt 
506 



TABLE XII 

Table XII 
Supplementary Lairs (ii) 
1 
' Distress ' against defaulters in sacred matters : 
Gaius : By statute, as for instance by the Law of the Twelve 
Tables, was introduced levying of distress " against a 
person who had bought an animal for sacrifice and 
was a defaulter by non-payment ; likewise against a 
j^erson who was a defaulter by non-payment of fee 
for yoke-beast which any one had hired out for the 
purpose of raising therefrom money to spend on a 
sacred banquet,'' that is, on a sacrifice. 

2a-b 

Delicts by slaves or children : " 

Ulpian : Celsus . . . concludes that there is a difference 
between the Aquillian Law and the Law of the Tivelve Tables. 
For, in the ancient Laic, if a slave has committed theft 
with his master's knowledge, . . . the action for 
damages is in the slave's name ... — 

2a If slave shall have committed theft or done 
damage . . . 

before any other legal action was taken; not to be confused 
with pignoris captio, which meant the act of any executive 
after a legal decision. The two cases of p. capio here laid 
down by the Tables concern rehgion; other known cases 
concern the state. P. capio was thus probably a privilege of 
the State allowed to individuals when their claims were' 
deemed to have public importance. 

^ consecrated to Jupiter Dapalis, ' Jupiter of Sacred Feast ' ; 
the banquet was probably that held before tilling or sowing. 
The enactment of this special case indicates that at the time 
of the Twelve Tables a seller who allowed credit, and later 
received no payment, could take no legal action for the price. 

" I keep this enactment in its usual place ; but it belongs to 
the fragments about delicts, which are put in Table VTTI. 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

Gains, Inst., IV, 75 : ^b Ex maleficiis filiorum familias 
servorumqiie . . . noxales actioncs proditae sunt, ut 
liceret patri dominove aut litis aestimationem sufferre, 
aut noxae dedere ... (76) Constitutae sunt . . . aut 
legibus aut edicto praetoris : legibus velut furti Lege XII 
Tabularum. 

Cp. Dig., XLVII, 6, 5; L, 16, 238, 3; Paul., Sent., II, 31, 7; 
Fest., \U,fin.; lustinian., Inst., IV, 8, 4. 

3 

Festus, 574, 16 : ' Vindiciae ' . . . singulariter <in>XII — 
2 Si vindiciam falsam tulit, si velit is . . . tor 

arbitros tris dato ; eorum arbitrio . . . fructus 

duplione damnum decidito. 

4 

Gaius, ap. Dig., XLIV, 6, 3 : Rem de qua controversia 
est prohibemur (sc. Lege XII Tabularum) in sacrum 

^ si V. i. praetor edd. rei sive litis Cuiacius stlitis 

et vindieiarum praetor 0. INIr. si velit is qui vicit praetor 
Wetzell si velit is . . . tor cd. fortasse <. . . recu- 

pera>tor <reus> fructus 0. ]\Ir. rei Huschke possessor 
Schoell neglecti Wetzell decidito Par. sched.. Vat Lat. 
1549, 2731 decidet Vat. Lat. 3368 decideto 3369 

" litis aestimatio was assessment of damages, in this case 
based on what a free or independent person would have to pay 
if he was found guilty of the same deUct. In the other 
alternative the Tables perhaps used the expression noxam 
dedere ' to surrender the offending person ' ; for this see note 
on Table VIII, 6, p. 479. 

^ From the accumulation of praetors' edicts arose ius 
honorarium or magisterial law which su])})lcmented such law 
as had been made by statute and interpretation. 

'^ That is, apparently, if a person, with or without fraudulent 
intent, had held and claimed as his a thing which a judicial 
court now decided belonged to another party. But tiic fr. 
is uncertain. 

508 



TABLE XII 

Gaius : ^b Arising from delicts committed by children 
and slaves of a household establishment . . . actions 
for damages were appointed whereby the father or 
master could be allowed either to undergo * assess- 
ment of suit,'° or hand over the delinquent to 
punishment. . . . These actions were instituted . . . partly 
by legal enactments, partly by the praetor's edict * ; by legal 
enactments as for instance by that for theft in the Law of the 
Ticelve Tables. 



False claims : 

Festus : ' Vindiciae,' legal claim ... in the singular . . . 
in the Ticelve Tables — 

3 If person has taken thing by false claim/ if he 
should wish . . . official ^ must grant three 
arbitrators ; by their arbitration . . . defen- 
dant must compound, for loss caused, by paying 
double damages from enjoyment of article/ 

4 

Dedication of articles which are in dispute : 
Gaius : We are prohibited [sc. by the Law of the Twelve 
Tables) from dedicating for consecrated use anything 

'^ The missing word ending in tor seems to be an oflficial; 
praetor would not apply to the time of the Tables, unless 
the consuls were, in the Tables, denoted by the old name 
praitor (see above, pp. 436, 480, in several sources for enact- 
ments of the Tables). Perhaps quaestor (but he would 
probably deal with more serious misdeeds) or recuperator. 
Boards of recuperatores or ' recoverers ' were originally 
appointed to deal with cases between Romans and foreigners, 
but later on they could be appointed to deal with disputes 
(especially about possessio) between citizens. 

' Retention of the article was deemed to have brought 
defendant some profit ; he must pay double this profit. 



THE TWELVE TABLES 

dedicare ; alioqiiiii dupli poenam })atiniur. . . . Sed 
dupluin utnim acrario an advcrsario praestanduiu sit, nihil 
expriiuitur. 

5 

Livius, VII, 17, 12 : Interrex Fabius aiebat in XII Tabulis 
legem esse ut quodciiniqiie postremum populus iussissct 
id ius ratumque esset. 

Cp. Liv., IX, 34, 6, 7. 



RELIQUA FRAGMENTA 

1 
Festus, 170, 24 : ' Nancitor ' in XII naetus erit, praenderit. 

2 

Festus, 344, fiti. : ' Quando ... in XII . . . cum c 
littera ultima seribitur {i.e. quaiidoc). 

Cp. Gai., Inst., IV, 21 (. . . quandoc . . .) 

3 
Festus, 444, 30 : Sub vos placo in precibus fere cum dicitur, 
significat id quod supplico, ut in legibus transque dato 
et endoque plorato. 

[3a] 

Philoxenus, Gloss. : Duicensus SirajS {i.e. XII Tabulis) 
Seurepov ciTroyeypa/i./xei'os'. 

Paul,, ex F., 47, 5 : ' Duicensus ' dicebatur cum altero id est 
filio census. 

Fest., 170 : nancitur (nancsitur) edd. nancsitor Corssen 
nanxitor vel nanxsitor Mr. 

Fest., 344 : cum d littera 0. Mr. e Ursin. 

" that is, it stands (by ' tmesis ') for vos sublaco = vos 
supplico, just as transque dato stands for transdatoque and 

5^0 



UNPLACED FRAGMENTS 

about which there is a controversy ; otherwise we 
suffer penalty of double the amount involved. . . . 
But as to whether this double amount must be paid to the 
treasury or to one's opponent there is no express ruling, 

5 
The people's latest ordinance on any matter is valid : 
Livy : The interrex Fabius stated that in the Tivelve Tables 
there was a law which enacted that whatsoever the people 
had last ordained should be held as binding by law. 

UNPLACED FRAGMENTS 

1 

Festus : ' Nancitor ' in the Twelve Tables means ' nactus 
erit ' (shall have obtained) or ' prenderit ' (shall have got 
hold of). 

2 

Festus : ' Quando ' (since, when) ... in the Tivelve Tables 
is written with the letter c {that is, ' quandoc '). 

3 

Festus : ' Sub vos placo,' I entreat you. When this ex- 
pression is used in prayers it generally means ' suppHco,' and is 
like the expressions ' transque dato ' and he must hand over 
and ' endoque plorato ' ° and he must call out in the laws. 

[3a] 

Philoxenus ; ' Duicensus,' assessed with a second, in the 
Twelve Tables, registered in the second place. 

Paulus : ' Duicensus ' was the term apphed to a man Mho 
was assessed with another, that is, with his son.* 

endoque plorato for endoploratoque = iviploratoque. Endoplor- 
ato occurs in Table VIII ; see above, pp. 484-5. 
* Cf. Cohn, Zeitschr.f. Sav.-Stift., 2 (1881), 113. 



TH1<: TWEL\ J: tables 



Donatus, ad Tcr., Eun., ITT, 3, 9: Dolo malo. Quod . . . 
addidit ' malo ' . . . apxalayios est, quia sic in XII a veteribus 
scriptum est. 

6 

Cicero, de Rep., II, 31, 54 : Ab onini iudicio poenaque 
provocari licere indicant XII Tabulae conpluribus legibus. 

6 

Cicero, de Off., Ill, 31, 111 : Nullum . . . vinculum ad 
adstringendam fidem iureiurando maiores arctius esse 
voluerunt. Id indicant leges in XII Tabulis. 

[6a] 

[Augustinus, de Civ. Dei, XXI, 11 : Octo genera poenarum 
in legibus esse scribit Tullius damnum, vincula, verbera, 
talionem, ignominiam, exilium, mortem, servitutem.] 

7 

PUnius, N.H., VII, 212 : XII Tabulis <sol> ortus tantura 
et occasua nominatur, post aliquot annos adiectus est et 
meridies. 

8 

Gaius (ad XII Tab.), ap. Dig., L., 16, 237 : Duobus 
negativis verbis quasi permittit Lex magis quam prohibuit. 



Gaius (ad XII Tab.), ap. Dig., L, 16, 238, 1 : Detestatum 

est testatione denuntiatum. 

" of the Twelve Tables ? 

* But we have ' noon ' or ' midday ' as well as ' sunset ' 
('sun set') in one law of Table I — see above, pp. 430-1 
(where ' noon ' or ' midday ' occurs twice). By ortus and 
occasus Pliny here means the nouns, ' the rising ' and ' the 

^12 



UNPLACED FRAGMENTS 

4 

Donatus, on ' dolo malo ' (by wilful fraud) in Terence : 
The addition of the word ' malo ' ... is an archaism, for 
this was an exj)ression used by the ancients in the Twelve 
Tables. 

5 

Cicero : That appeal from any judgment or sentence 
was allowed is shown by the Twelve Tables in many laws. 

6 

Cicero : Xo bond, by the wish of our ancestors, was to be closer 
in guaranteeing good faith than a sworn oath. This is shown 
by the Laws of the Twelve Tables. 

[6a] 

[Augustinus : Eight kinds of penalty, writes Tullius, are to 
be found in the laws," namely fine, fetters, flogging, re- 
taliation in kind, civil disgrace, banishment, death 
and slavery.] 

7 

Pliny : In the Ticelve Tables only sun risen and * set ' are 
mentioned as such; only after a number of years was the 
term ' midda}',' or ' noon,' also added.* 



Gains : By the use of the double negatives the Laiv really 
permits and did not prohibit. 

9 

Gains: ' Detestatum,' « having renounced under oath, 
means ' having renounced by solemn attestation.' 

setting '; but, in analogy with ' sol occasus ' (see pp. 430-1), 
I conclude that the Tables used the expression ' sol ortus,' and 
translate ' ortus ' and ' occasus ' here as participles. 

" detestari is to make a solemn declaration, generally a 
renunciation. 

5T3 

VOL. III. L L 



THE TWELVE TABLES 
10 

[Sidonius Apollinaris, Ep., VIII, 6, 7 : Per ipsura fere 
tempus, ut decemviraliter loquar, lex de praescriptione 
triccnnii fuerat proquiritata.] 

11 

Gains, Inst., J, 122 : Idco . . . aes et libra adhibetur, 
quia oLini aereis tantuiu nummis utebantur, et erant asses, 
thipondii, semisses, et quadrantes, nee ullus aureus vel 
argenteus nummus in usu erat, sicut ex Lege XII Tabularura 
intellegere possumus. Eoruraque nummorum vis et potestas 
non in numero erat sed in pondcre * * * asses librales erant, et 
dupondii * * * ; unde etiam dupondius dictiis est quasi duo 
pondo, quod nomen adhuc in usu retinetur. Semisses quoque 
et quadrantes pro rata scilicet portione ad pondus examinati 
erant * * *. Qui dabat olim pecuniam, non numerabat earn, 
sed appendebat; unde servi quibus permittitur administratio 
pecuniae ' dispensatores ' appollati sunt. 

8-10 = 9_ii Bruns " = 8 Bruns 

" This may mean ' like the decemviri stlitihus iudicandis ' 
(who tried civil cases), not the decemvirs who drew up the 
Tables. We have a 30 days' limit in Table III, above, pp. 
436-7. 

^ all that follows is explanator\\ There is no other evidence 
that words for multiples or fractions of the as-piece were 
mentioned in the Tables. We have, however, the whole 
as-piece mentioned several times therein. 



5^4 



UNPLACED FRAGMENTS 

10 

[Sidonius : During that very time almost, if I may speak 
Board-of-Ten-^vise,<» a law about thirty years' limitation 
of time had been proclaimed.] 

11 

Gains : The reason for emjiloying (in mancipatio) copper (or 
bronze) and a scales is the customary use at one time of a 
currency of copper pieces only, these being called ' asses ' 
' bars ' (or ' units '), ' two-pound bars,' ' half-bars,' ' quar- 
ters,' no gold or silver piece being in use at all, as we can 
understand from the Law of the Twelve Tables * ; and the force 
and power of these pieces rested not in their number but in 
their weight. * * * The ' asses ' were each a pound of copper ; " 
and ' two-pound asses ' <were each two pounds), which is 
the reason why the ' double as ' was called ' dupondius ' so 
to speak ' two in weight 'or ' two-pound bar,' a name which is 
still retained in use. Again, the ' half-as ' and the ' quarter- 
as ' were of course defined by weighing in the balance according 
to their fractional part of a pound * * *. At one time a 
person paying money did not count this but weighed it. That 
is why slaves to whom administration of money is entrusted 
have been given the name ' dispensatores,' ' outweighers.' 

' The a5-unit, as a concrete thing, was originally a bar (one 
foot long) of aes (copper alloyed mostly with tin; bronze), 
then a weight and a coin weighing one pound. But from the 
first Punic War onwards it was reduced in weight. Whether 
the stamping of copper pieces as coins had its origin in the 
Tables is uncertain. Probably this official action began later. 



515 



CONCORDANCES 

lOR LUCILIUS 



Ix the following concordances, M stands for Marx's 
edition of Lucilius, W for this. By catal. is meant 
the list of words and phrases which is to be found on 
pages 418-423 of this book. Useful though Ter- 
zaghi's edition is, neither his nor Bolisani's is 
meant to supersede Marx's. Terzaghi provides a 
handy text and commentary ; Bolisani writes for 
Italians mainly. Hence no concordance between this 
work and theirs has been thought necessary. 





Concordance I 




M 


W 


M 


w 


1 


1 


17 


14 


2 


3-4 


18 


18 


3 


ajier 4 


19-22 


24-7 


4 


5 


23 


part of 28-9 


5-6 


6-7 


24-5 


28-9 


7 


8 


26 


19 


8 


9 


27-9 


20-2 


9 


2 


30 


23 


10 


10 


31 


35 


11 


11 


32 


33 


12 


12 


33-5 


30-2 


13 


13 


36 


34 


14 


17 


37-9 


39-41 


lo-G 


15-6 


40-2 


42-5 



516 



CONCORDANCE I 



M 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 
49-50 
51-2 

53 

54 

55 

56 
57-8 

59 
60-1 
62-3 

64 

65 

66 
67-8 
69-70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 
76-7 
78-80 

81 
82-3 
84-6 

87 
88-94 

95 

96 
97-8 
99-100 

101 
102-4 
105-6 
107-8 



w 

36 
37 

38 

47 
50-1 
48-9 

52 

46 

53 

82 
54-5 

56 
73-4 
78-9 

75 

76 

57 
58-9 
80-1 

60 

62 

61 

63 

70 
71-2 
67-9 

66 
64-5 
84-6 

77 
87-93 

after 93 
94-5 
96-7 
117 
143-5 
133-4 
140-1 



M 



W 



109 


98 


110-3 


102-5 


114 


106 


115-6 


107-8 


117-8 


109-10 


119 


111 


120 


114 


121-2 


115-6 


123 


118 


124 


120 


125 


119 


126 


121 


127 


122 


128 


123 


129 


124 


130 


99-100 


131 


125 


132 


126 


133 


127 


134-5 


128-9 


136 


130 


137 


131 


138 


135 


139 


132 


140-1 


136-7 


142-3 


138-9 


144-5 


146-7 


146 


148 


147 


catal. 


148 


after 148 


149-52 


172-5 


153-8 


176-81 


159 


184 


160 


149 


161-2 


150-1 


163 


153 


164 


155 


165 


(p. 49) 


166-7 


159-60 


168 


161 


169-70 


162-3 



517 





LUCILIUS 




M 


W 


M 


w 


171 


165 


238-9 


275-6 


172 


164 


240-1 


285-8 


173 


166 


242 


259 


174-6 


167-9 


243-6 


278-81 


177-8 


170-1 


247-8 


262-3 


179-80 


157-8 


249-50 


282 


181-8 


186-93 


251 


284 


189-90 


194-5 


252 


277 


191-2 


198-9 


253 


283 


193 


218 


254-5 


287-8 


194 


216 


256 


289 


195 


217 


257 


269 


196-7 


220 


258-9 


270-1 


198-9 


221-2 


260 


272 


200 


214 


261-2 


273-4 


201 


223 


263 


290 


202 


213 


264-5 


296-7 


203-5 


208-10 


266 


298 


206-7 


249-50 


267 


299 


208-9 


247-8 


268 


315-6 


210-11 


233-4 


269-70 


294-5 


212 


235 


271 


291 


213 


239 


272 


part of 308- 


214 


238 


273-4 


308-9 


215 


240 


275 


310 


216-7 


241-2 


276-7 


311-2 


218 


246 


278 


302 


219 


243 


279-81 


303-5 


220 


244 


282-3 


306-7 


221 


236 


284 


301 


222 


237 


285 


300 


223-4 


226-7 


286 


319 


225 


245 


287 


320 


226-7 


230-1 


288-9 


321-2 


228-9 


252-3 


290 


323 


230 


261 


291 


318 


231-2 


267-8 


292 


317 


233 


265 


293 


313 


234 


260 


294 


314 


235 


264 


295 


catal. 


236-7 


266 


296-7 


324-5 



518 



CONCORDANCE I 



M 

298 

299 
300-1 

302 
303^ 

306 

306 

307 

308 
309-10 

311 

312 
313-4 
315-6 

317 

318 

319 

320 

321 
322-3 
324-5 

326 

327 
328-9 

330 
331-2 

333 
334-5 
336-7 
338^7 

348 

349-50 

351, 352-5 

356 

357 
358-61 
362-3 
364-6 
367-8 
369-70 

371 



w 

327 
330 

328-9 
catal. 
331-2 

333 

334 

335 

336 
337-8 

339 

326 
343-4 
345-6 

340 
341-2 

347 

348 

349 
350-1 
352-3 

364 

365 
357-8 

361 
354-5 

356 
359-60 
362-3 
401-10 
after 148 
366-7 
368-72 

373 

374 
384-7 
375-6 
377-9 
380-1 
382-3 
'part of 388 



M 

372 
373 

374 
375-6 
377-80 

381 

382 

383 

384 

385 
386-7 

388 

389 

390 

391 

392 

393 
394-5 

396 

397 
398-9 

400 
401-4 
405-6 
407-8 
409-10 
411-2 
413-5 

416 

417 
418-20 

421 
422-4 

425 

426 

427 
428-9 

430 

431 

432 
433-4 



W 

388 
after 392 

393 
394-5 
389-92 

396 

after 388 

after 410 

after 410 

418 a 

417-8 

412 

419 

420 

422 

421 

423 

424-5 

(p. 134) 

428 
430-1 

429 
432-5 
426-7 
436-7 
438-9 
448-9 
440-2 

443 

444 

450-2 

after 453 

445-7 

453 

454 

455 
456-7 

460 

463 

464 

458-9 



519 





LUCILIUS 




M 


W 


M 


w 


435-6 


461-2 


503 


543 


437 


ajler 464 


504-5 


534-5 


438-9 


472 


506-8 


511-3 


440-1 


465-6 


509 


514 


442-3 


470-1 


510 


515 


444 


469 


511 


518 


445 


467 


512-3 


516-7 


446 


468 


514 


519 


447 


473 


515-6 


507-8 


448 


475 


517 


afler 622 


449 


476 


518 


after 563 


450-1 


477-8 


519-20 


552-3 


452 


474 


521 


556 


453 


479 


522-4 


549-51 


454-5 


481 


525-6 


547-8 


456 


482 


527-9 


544-6 


457-8 


489-90 


530 


555 


459-60 


493-4 


531 


562 


461 


483 


532-3 


557-8 


462-3 


491-2 


534-6 


559-61 


464-5 


495-6 


537 


563 


466 


497 


538-9 


565-6 


467-8 


499-500 


540-6 


567-73 


469-70 


501-2 


547-8 


575-6 


471 


504 


549 


564 


472 


503 


550-1 


577-8 


473 


484 


552-3 


579-80 


474-5 


485-6 


554 


583 


476 


505 


555-6 


581-2 


477 


catal. 


557 


590 


478-9 


487-8 


558 


591 


480-3 


520-3 


559-60 


588-9 


484-9 


524-9 


561-2 


586-7 


490-1 


509-10 


563 


584 


492 


530 


564 


585 


493-4 


531-2 


565-6 


592-3 


495 


542 


567 


594 


496 


533 


568 


598 


497-8 


540-1 


569 


604 


499-500 


538-9 


570-2 


612-4 


501-2 


536-7 


573-4 


607-8 



520 



CONCORDANCE I 



M 

575-6 

577 

578 
579-80 

581 

582 

583 

584 

585 

586 

587 
588-9 
590-1 
592-3 

594 
595-6 
597-8 
599-600 

601 

602 
603-4 

605 

606 

607 

608 

609 

610 

611 

612 
613-4 
615-6 

617 
618-9 

620 

621 

622 

623 

624 

625 

626 

627 



W 

605-6 

611 

622 
624-5 

623 

627 

628 

626 

629 

630 

723 
720-1 
670-1 

635 
after 635 
632-4 
729-30 
727-8 

731 

722 
724-5 

732 

733 

734 

726 

712 

690 

694 

700 
708-9 
710-1 

689 
692-3 

713 

714 

691 

704 

706 

707 

717 

718 



M 

628 
629 
630 
631 
632 

633^ 

635-6 
637 
638 
639 
640 
641 
642 
643 
644 

645-6 

647-8 
649 
650 

651-2 
653 
654 
655 

656-7 
658 
659 

660-1 
662 
663 
664 
665 
666 
667 
668 
669-70 
671-2 

673-4 
675 
676 
677 

678-9 



w 

702 

701 

703 

705 

699 

715-6 

676-7 

681 

678 

679 

687 

688 

680 

686 

719 

684-5 

682-3 

674 

675 

672-3 

665 

666 

669 

667-8 

664 

662 

660-1 

663 

659 

657 

658 

654 

655 

656 

652-3 

650-1 

648-9 

647 

637 

636 

644-5 



521 





LUCILIUS 




M 


W 


M 


w 


680 


639 


732 


744 


681 


638 


733 


748 


682-3 


640-1 


734 


741 


684-5 


642-3 


735 


742 


686 


646 


736 


747 


687 


735 


737 


740 


688-9 


791-2 


738 


749 


690 


772-3 


739 


739 


691 


790 


740 


783 


692 


771 


741 


743 


693 


770 


742 


835 


694 


774 


743 


837 


695 


775 


744 


843 


696 


709 


745-6 


838-9 


697 


784 


747 


841 


698 


786 


748 


840 


699 


779 


749 


836 


700 


781 


750 


842 


701 


777 


751 


815 


702 


785 


752 


816 


703 


780 


753 


820 


704-5 


766-7 


754 


821 


706 


776 


755-6 


822-3 


707 


759 


757 


819 


708 


758 


758 


833 


709-10 


788-9 


759 


834 


711 


768 


760 


829 


712^ 


763-5 


761 


830 


715 


787 


762-3 


824-5 


716-7 


761-2 


764 


827 


718 


760 


765 


826 


719 


750 


766-7 


831-2 


720-1 


751-2 


768 


828 


722-3 


753-4 


769-70 


817-8 


724 


782 


771-2 


796-7 


725 


746 


773 


795 


726-7 


755-7 


774 


814 


728 


745 


775 


798 


729 


737 


776 


799 


730 


738 


777 


801 


731 


778 


778 


800 



522 



CONCORDANCE I 



U 

779 

780 

781 

782 

783 

784-90 

791 

792 

793 

794 

795 

796-7 

798 

799 

800-1 

802 

803 

804 

805 

806-7 

808-9 

810 

811 

812 

813-4 

815 

816 

817 

818-9 

820 

821-2 

823 

824 

825 

826-7 

828-9 

830-1 

832-3 

834 

835 

836 



w 

802 

793 

794 

803 

804 
805-11 

812 

813 

736 

844 

845 
846-7 

851 

848 
849-50 

968 

969 

972 

971 

962 

963 

964 

970 

973 
966-7 

965 

948 

897 
890-1 

961 
929-30 

949 

950 

951 
952-3 
954-5 
957-8 
959-60 

956 

935 
934 



M 



W 



837-8 


939-40 


839 


942 


840 


941 


841-2 


943^ 


843 


946 


844 


947 


845 


945 


846-7 


936-7 


848-50 


931-3 


851-2 


910-1 


853 


912 


854-5 


917-8 


856 


916 


857-8 


919-20 


859-60 


923^ 


861-2 


925 


863-5 


913-5 


866-7 


927-8 


868-9 


921-2 


870-1 


882-3 


872-3 


885 


874 


886 


875 


879 


876 


880 


877 


881 


878 


900 


879-80 


901-2 


881 


903 


882-3 


904-5 


884-5 


906 


886 


907 


887 


908 


888-9 


887-8 


890 


892 


891-3 


893-5 


894 


889 


895-6 


852-3 


897 


866 


898 


854 


899 


858 


900-1 


855-6 



523 





LUCILIUS 




M 


W 


M 


w 


902 


874 


963^ 


983-4 


903-4 


875-6 


965 


990 


905 


877 


966 


981 


906-7 


867-8 


967 


993 


908 


869 


968 


catal. 


909-10 


870-1 


969 


999 


911 


862 


970 


1121 


912 


872 


971 


1122 


913 


873 


972 


1123 


914 


865 


973 


1124 


915 


859 


974-5 


1129-30 


916 


857 


976-7 


1125-6 


917 


878 


978-9 


1109-10 


918-9 


860-1 


980-1 


1111-2 


920-1 


863-4 


982 


1115 


922 


909 


983-4 


1113-4 


923-4 


976-7 


985-6 


1116-7 


925-7 


after 817 


987 


1118 


928-32 


catal. 


988-9 


1119-20 


933-4 


898-9 


990 


1107 


935 


978 


991 


1095 


936-7 


974-5 


992 


1098 


938 


938 


993-4 


1096-7 


939 


884 


995 


1104 


940-1 


896 


996 


1101 


942-3 


979-80 


997 


1099 


944 


985 


998-9 


1102-3 


945 


986 


1000 


1100 


946 


988 


1001 


1093 


947 


989 


1002 


1094 


948-9 


997-8 


1003 


1105 


950-1 


991-2 


1004 


1106 


952 


after 963-4 


1005-6 


1127-8 


953 


695 


1007 


1108 


954-5 


995-6 


1008 


1061 


956 


698 


1009 


1065 


957-8 


696-7 


1010 


1062 


959 


catal. 


1011 


1092 


960 


994 


1012 


1090 


961 


987 


1013 


1091 


962 


982 


1014 


1084 



524 



CONCORDANCE I 



M 



W 



1015 


1085 


1016 


1086 


1017 


1078 


1018 


1081 


1019 


1082 


1020 


1083 - 


1021 


1087 


1022-3 


1079-80 


1024-5 


1072-3 


1026 


1077 


1027 


1063 


1028 


1064 


1029 


1074 


1030 


1069 


1031 


1067 


1032 


1068 


1033 


1070 


1034 


1071 


1035 


1075 


1036 


1066 


1037-8 


1088-9 


1039^0 


1039-40 


1041-2 


1041-2 


1043-4 


1043-4 


1045-6 


1059-60 


1047 


1045 


1048 


1047 


1049 


1046 


1050 


1052 


1051 


1049 


1052 


1050 


1053 


1049 


1054 


1058 


1055 


1057 


1056-7 


1053-4 


1058 


1048 


1059 


1038 


1060 


1025 


1061 


1026 


1062 


1027 


1063 


1034 



M 

1064 
1065-6 

1067 

1068 

1069 

1070 
1071-2 
1073-4 

1075 
1076-7 

1078 

1079 
1080-1 
1082-3 

1084 

1085 
1086-7 

1088 

1089 

1090 

1091 

1092 

1093 

1094 
1095-6 

1097 

1098 

1099 

1100 

1101 

1102 

1103 

1104 

1105 

1106 
1107-8 

1109 

1110 

1111 

1112 

1113-4 



w 

1037 

1028-9 

1030 

1031 

1021 

1020 

1035-6 

1022-3 

1024 

1032-3 

1016 

1008 

1009-10 

1011-2 

1014 

1013 

1015 

1017 

1018 

1002 

1019 

1007 

1005 

1004 

1000-1 

1003 

1006 

catal. 

397 

225 

1134 

1159 

1212 

1177 

480 

228-9 

154 

catal. 

411 

catal. 

617-8 



525 





LUCILIUS 




M 


W 


M 


w 


1115-G 


1166-7 


1169 


1260 


1117 


1210 


1170 


1254 


1118 


1169 


1171 


1191 


1119-20 


1194-5 


1172 


1241 


1121 


1184 


1173 


224 


1122-3 


206-7 


1174-6 


601-3 


1124 


142 


1177 


after 909 


1125 


catal. 


1178 


after 1247 


1126 


catal. 


1179 


1213 


1127 


catal. 


1180 


after 594 


1128 


1176 


1181-2 


609-10 


1129 


catal. 


1183 


1232 


1130 


232 


1184 


catal. 


1131 


596 


1185 


1244 


1132 


— 


1186 


1182 


1133 


416 


1187 


185 


1134-6 


211-2 


1188 


215 


1137 


catal. 


1189 


after 413 


1138-42 


254-8 


1190 


413 


1143 


catal. 


1191-2 


1163-4 


1144 


catal. 


1193 


1168 


1145 


1154 


1194 


1245 


1146 


catal. 


1195 


1246 


1147 


1153 


1196 


1231 


1148 


1152 


1197 


1188 


1149 


after 1110 


1198 


catal. 


1150 


1217 


1199 


1259 


1151 


597 


1200 


599 


1152 


616 


1201-2 


1222-3 


1153-4 


1242-3 


1203-4 


1136-7 


155-1155 a 


1226-7 


1205 


1235 


1156 


catal. 


1206 


1230 


1157 


219 


1207 


101 


1158-9 


1155-6 


1208 


1225 


1160 


1215 


1209 


after 412 


1161 


1157 


1210 


catal. 


1162-3 


1228-9 


1211 


1212 


1164 


1238 


1212 


after 1257-8 


1165-6 


1265-6 


1213-4 


1185-6 


1167 


1233 


1215-7 


398-400 


1168 


after 418 


1218 


1269 



526 



CONCORDANCE I 



M 

1219 
1220 
1221 
1222 
1223 
1224 
1225-6 

1227 

1228-34 

1235-40 

1241 

1242-3 
1244 
1245 
1246 
1247 
1248 
1249 

1250-1 
1252 
1253 
1254 

1255-6 

1257-8 
1259 
1260 
1261 
1262 
1263 

1264-5 
1266 
1267 
1268 
1269 
1270 
1271 
1272 

1273-4 
1275 
1276 



w 

1144 

1193 

1175 

1179 

251 

1174 
1189-90 

1076 

1145-51 

200-5 

ajler 1134, and 

catal. 
1255-6 

1262 

1165 

1253 

1247 

1183 

1209 
1055-7 
catal. 

1160 
catal. 
1172-3 
292-3 

1132 

1133 

after 1131 

after 1131 

after 1131 

414-5 

1211 

1180 

1187 

595 

1224 

1178 

1162 
182-3 

1248 

1220 



M 

1277 
1278 
1279 
1280 
1281 

1282-3 

1284-6 
1287 
1288 
1289 
1290 
1291 
1292 
1293 

1294-5 
1296 
1297 
1298 
1299 
1300 
1301 
1302 
1303 
1304 
1305 
1306 
1307 
1308 
1309 
1310 
1311 

1312-3 
1314 
1315 
1316 
1317 
1318 
1319-20 
1321 
1322 
1323 



w 

196 

506 

1131 

1135 

1192 
1170-1 
1250-2 

1161 

1234 

catal. 

1236 

498 

197 

1261 
1257-8 

574 

926 

1264 

catal. 

catal. 

1158 

1216 

621 

1221 

1249 

1270 

1239 

615 
619-20 

631 

catal. 
1138^1 

156 

1240 
after 1177 

1237 
1267-8 

1214 
after 1141 

1181 



527 





LUCILIUS 




M 


W 


M 


w 


1324-5 


1218-9 


1356 





1320-38 


1196-1208 


1357 


— 


1339 


after 352-3 


1358 


catal 


1340 


1271 


1359 


catal 


1341 


catal. 


1360 





1342-3 


112-3 


1361 


catal 


1344-6 


1142-3 


1362 


— 


1347 


152 


1363 


catal 


1348 


83 


1364-5 


— 


1349 


1263 


1366 





1350 


554 


1367 


catal 


1351 


— 


1368 


— 


1352 


— 


1369 


catal 


1353 


600 


1370-78 


— 


1354-5 


— 








LUCILIUS 





Concordance II 



W 

1 

2 
3-4 

5 
6-7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 
15-6 

17 

18 

19 
20-2 

23 



M 

1 

9 

2 

4 
5-6 

7 

8 

10 
11 
12 
13 
17 
15-6 
14 
18 
26 
27-9 
30 



528 



w 

24-7 
28-9 
30-2 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 
39-41 
42-5 

46 

47 
48-9 
50-1 

52 

53 
54-5 



M 

19-22 

24-5 

33-5 

32 

36 

31 

43 

44 

46 
37-9 
40-2 

54 

48 
51-2 
49-50 

53 

55 
57-8 



CONCORDANCE II 



W 

56 
57 
58-9 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64-5 

66 
67-9 

70 

71-2 

73-4 

75 

76 

77 

78-9 

80-1 

82 

83 

84-6 

87-93 

94-5 

96-7 

98 

99-100 

101 
102-5 

106 
107-8 
109-10 

111 
112-3 
114 
115-6 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 



VOL. III. 



M 

59 

66 
67-8 

71 

73 

72 

74 
82-3 

81 
78-80 

75 
76-7 
60-1 

64 

65 

87 
62-3 
69-70 

56 
1348 
84-6 
88-94 
97-8 
99-100 

109 

130 
1207 
110-3 

114 
115-6 
117-8 

119 
1342-3 

120 
121-2 

101 

123 

125 

124 

126 

127 



W 



M 



123 


128 


124 


129 


125 


131 


126 


132 


127 


133 


128-9 


134-5 


130 


136 


131 


137 


132 


139 


133-4 


105-6 


135 


138 


136-7 


140-1 


138-9 


142-3 


140-1 


107-8 


142 


1124 


143-5 


102-4 


146-7 


144-5 


148 


146 


149 


160 


150-1 


161-2 


152 


1347 


153 


163 


154 


1109 


155 


164 


156 


1315 


157-8 


179-80 


159-60 


166-7 


161 


168 


162-3 


169-70 


164 


172 


165 


171 


166 


173 


167-9 


174-6 


170-1 


177-8 


172-5 


149-52 


176-81 


153-8 


182-3 


1273-4 


184 


159 


185 


1187 


186-93 


181-8 


194-5 


189-90 



529 





LUCILIUS 




w 


M 


W 


M 


196 


1277 


262-3 


247-8 


197 


1292 


264 


235 


198-9 


191-2 


265 


233 


200-7 


1235-^0,1122-3 


266 


236-7 


208-10 


203-5 


267-8 


231-2 


211-2 


1134-0 


269 


257 


213 


202 


270-1 


258-9 


214 


200 


272 


260 


215 


1188 


273-4 


261-2 


216 


194 


275-6 


238-9 


217 


195 


277 


252 


218 


193 


278-81 


243-6 


219 


1157 


282 


249-50 


220 


196-7 


283 


253 


221-2 


198-9 


284 


251 


223 


201 


285-6 


240-1 


224-5 . 


1173, 1101 


287-8 


254-5 


226-7 


223-4 


289 


256 


228-9 


1107-8 


290 


263 


230-1 


226-7 


291 


271 


232 


1130 


292-5 


1257-8,269-70 


233-4 


210-1 


296-7 


264-5 


235 


212 


298 


266 


236 


221 


299 


267 


237 


222 


300 


285 


238 


214 


301 


284 


239 


213 


302 


278 


240 


215 


303-5 


279-81 


241-2 


216-7 


306-7 


282-3 


243 


219 


308-9 


273-4 


244 


220 


310 


275 


245 


225 


311-2 


276-7 


246 


218 


313 


293 


247-8 


208-9 


314 


294 


249-50 


206-7 


315-6 


268 


251 


1223 


317 


292 


252-3 


228-9 


318 


291 


254-8 


1138-42 


319 


286 


259 


242 


320 


287 


260 


234 


321-2 


288-9 


261 


230 


323 


290 



530 



CONCORDANCE II 



W 

324-5 

326 

327 
328-9 

330 
331-2 

333 

334 

335 

336 
337-8 

339 

340 
341-2 
343-4 
345-6 

347 

348 

349 
350-1 
352-3 
354-5 

356 
357-8 
359-60 

361 
362-3 

364 

365 
366-7 
368-72 

373 

374 
375-6 
377-9 
380-1 
382-3 
384-7 

388 
389-92 

393 



M 

296-7 

312 

298 

300-1 

299 

303-4 

305 

306 

307 

308 

309-10 

311 

317 

318 

313-4 

315-6 

319 

320 

321 

322-3 

324-5 

331-2 

333 

328-9 

334-5 

330 

336-7 

326 

327 

349-50 

351, 352-5 

356 

357 

362-3 

364-6 

367-8 

369-70 

358-61 

372 

377-80 

374 



W 

394-5 

396 

397 
398-400 
401-10 

411 

412 

413 
414-5 

416 
417-8 
418 a 

419 

420 

421 

422 

423 
424-5 
426-7 

428 

429 
430-1 
432-5 
436-7 
438-9 
440-2 

443 

444 
445-7 
448-9 
450-2 

453 

454 

455 
456-7 
458-9 

460 
461-2 

463 

464 
465-6 



M 

375-6 

381 

1100 
1215-7 

338^7 

1111 

388 

1190 
1264-5 

1133 
386-7 

385 

389 

390 

392 

391 

393 
394-5 
405-6 

397 

400 
398-9 
401^ 
407-8 
409-10 
413-5 

416 

417 
422-4 
411-2 
418-20 

425 

426 

427 
428-9 
433-4 

430 
435-6 

431 

432 
440-1 



531 



M M 2 





LUCILIUS 




w 


M 


W 


M 


407 


445 


531-2 


493-4 


468 


446 


533 


496 


469 


444 


534-5 


504-5 


470-1 


442-3 


536-7 


501-2 


472 


438-9 


538-9 


499-500 


473 


447 


540-1 


497-8 


474 


452 


542 


495 


475 


448 


543 


503 


476 


449 


544-6 


527-9 


477-8 


450-1 


547-8 


525-6 


479 


453 


549-51 


522-4 


480 


1106 


552-3 


519-20 


481 


454-5 


554 


1350 


482 


456 


555 


530 


483 


461 


556 


521 


484 


473 


557-8 


532-3 


485-6 


474-5 


559-61 


534-6 


487-8 


478-9 


562 


531 


489-90 


457-8 


563 


537 


491-2 


462-3 


564 


549 


493-4 


459-60 


565-6 


538 


495-6 


464-5 


567-73 


540-6 


497 


466 


574 


1296 


498 


1291 


575-6 


547-8 


499-500 


467-8 


577-8 


550-1 


501-2 


469-70 


579-80 


552-3 


503 


472 


581-2 


555-6 


504 


471 


583 


554 


505 


476 


584 


563 


506 


1278 


585 


564 


507-8 


515-6 


586-7 


561-2 


509-10 


490-1 


588-9 


559-60 


511-3 


506-8 


590 


557 


514 


509 


591 


558 


515 


510 


692-3 


565-6 


516-7 


512-3 


594 


567 


518 


511 


595 


1269 


519 


514 


596 


1131 


520-3 


480-3 


597 


1151 


524-9 


484-9 


598 


568 


530 


492 


599 


1200 



532 



CONCORDANCE II 



W 

600 
601-3 
604 
605-6 
607-8 
609-10 

611 

612-4 

615 

616 

617-8 

619-20 

621 

622 

623 

624-5 

626 

627 

628 

629 

630 

631 

632-4 

635 

636-7 

638 

639 

640-1 

642-3 

644-5 

646 

647 

648-9 

650-1 

652-3 

654 

655 

656 

657 

658 

659 



M 

1353 
1174-6 

569 

575-6 

573-4 

1181-2 

577 
570-2 
1308 
1152 
113-4 
1309 
1303 

578 

581 
579-80 

584 

582 

583 

585 

586 

1310 

595-6 

592-3 

677, 676 

681 

680 
682-3 
684-5 
678-9 

686 

675 
673^ 
671-2 
669-70 

666 

667 

668 

664 

665 

663 



w 

660-1 
662 
663 
664 
665 
666 

667-8 
669 

670-1 

672-3 
674 
675 

676-7 
078 
679 
680 
681 

682-3 

684-5 
686 
687 
688 
689 
690 
691 

692-3 
694 
695 

696-7 
698 
699 
700 
701 
702 
703 
704 
705 
706 
707 

708-9 

710-1 



M 

660-1 
659 
662 
658 
653 
654 

656-7 
655 

590-1 

651-2 
649 
650 

635-6 
638 
639 
642 
637 

647-8 

645-6 
643 
640 
641 
617 
610 
622 

618-9 
611 
953 

957-8 
956 
632 
612 
629 
628 
630 
623 
631 
624 
625 

613-4 

615-6 



532 



w 


M 


w 


M 


712 


609 


763-5 


712-4 


713 


620 


766-7 


704-5 


714 


621 


768 


711 


715-6 


G33-4 


769 


696 


717 


626 


770 


693 


718 


627 


771 


692 


719 


644 


772-3 


690 


720-1 


588-9 


774 


694 


722 


602 


775 


695 


723 


587 


776 


706 


724-5 


603-4 


777 


701 


726 


608 


778 


731 


727-8 


599-600 


779 


699 


729-30 


597-8 


780 


703 


731 


601 


781 


700 


732 


605 


782 


724 


733 


606 


783 


740 


734 


607 


784 


697 


735 


687 


785 


702 


736 


793 


786 


698 


737 


729 


787 


715 


738 


730 


788-9 


709-10 


739 


739 


790 


691 


740 


737 


791-2 


688-9 


741 


734 


793 


780 


742 


735 


794 


781 


743 


741 


795 


773 


744 


732 


796-7 


771-2 


745 


728 


798 


775 


746 


725 


799 


776 


747 


736 


800 


778 


748 


733 


801 


777 


749 


738 


802 


779 


750 


719 


803 


782 


751-2 


720-1 


804 


783 


753-4 


722-3 


805-11 


784-90 


755-7 


726-7 


812 


791 


758 


708 


813 


792 


759 


707 


814 


774 


760 


718 


815 


751 


761-2 


716-7 


816 


752 



534 



CONCORDANCE II 



W 

817-8 

819 

820 

821 
822-3 
824-5 

826 

827 

828 

829 

830 
831-2 

833 

834 

835 

836 

837 
838-9 

840 

841 

842 

843 

844 

845 
846-7 

848 
849-50 

851 
852-3 

854 
855-6 

857 

858 

859 
860-1 

862 
863-4 

865 

866 
867-8 

869 



M 

769-770 

757 

753 

754 
755-6 
762-3 

765 

764 

768 

760 

761 
766-7 

758 

759 

742 

749 

743 
745-6 

748 

747 

750 

744 

794 

795 
796-7 

799 
800-1 

798 
895-6 

898 
900-1 

916 

899 

915 
918-9 

911 
920-1 

914 

897 
906-7 

908 



w 

870-1 

872 

873 

874 
875-6 

877 

878 

879 

880 

881 
882-3 

884 

885 

886 
887-8 

889 
890-1 

892 
893-5 

896 

897 
898-9 

900 
901-2 

903 
904-5 

906 

907 

908 

909 
910-1 

912 
913-5 

916 
917-8 
919-20 
921-2 
923-4 

925 

926 
927-8 



M 

909-10 

912 

913 

902 
903-4 

905 

917 

875 

876 

877 
870-1 

939 
872-3 

874 
888-9 

894 
818-9 

890 
891-3 
940-1 

817 
933-4 

878 
879-80 

881 
882-3 
884-5 

886 

887 

922 
851-2 

853 
863-5 

856 
854^5 
857-8 
868-9 
859-60 
861-2 

1297 
866-7 



535 





LUCILIUS 




w 


M 


w 


M 


929-30 


821-2 


985 


944 


931-3 


848-50 


986 


945 


934 


836 


987 


961 


935 


835 


988 


946 


936-7 


846-7 


989 


947 


938 


938 


990 


965 


939-40 


837-8 


991-2 


950-1 


941 


840 


993 


967 


942 


839 


994 


960 


943-4 


841-'2 


995-6 


954-5 


945 


845 


997-8 


948-9 


946 


843 


999 


969 


947 


844 


1000-1 


1095-6 


948 


816 


1002 


1090 


949 


823 


1003 


1097 


950 


824 


1004 


1094 


951 


825 


1005 


1093 


952-3 


826-7 


1006 


1098 


954-5 


828-9 


1007 


1092 


956 


834 


1008 


1079 


957-8 


830-1 


1009-10 


1080-1 


959-60 


832-3 


1011-2 


1082-3 


961 


820 


1013 


1085 


962 


806-7 


1014 


1084 


963 


808-9 


1015 


1086-7 


964 


810 


1016 


1078 


965 


815 


1017 


1088 


966-7 


813-4 


1018 


1089 


968 


802 


1019 


1091 


969 


803 


1020 


1070 


970 


811 


1021 


1069 


971 


805 


1022-3 


1073-4 


972 


804 


1024 


1075 


973 


812 


1025 


1060 


974-5 


936-7 


1026 


1061 


976-7 


923-4 


1027 


1062 


978 


935 


1028-9 


1065-6 


979-80 


942-3 


1030 


1067 


981 


966 


1031 


1068 


982 


962 


1032-3 


1076-7 


983-4 


963-4 


1034 


1063 



536 



CONCORDANCE II 



W 

1035-6 

1037 

1038 

1039-iO 

1041-2 

1043-4 

1045 

1046 

1047 

1048 

1049-51 

1052 
1053^ 
1055-6 
1057 
1058 
1059-€0 
1061 
1062 
1063 
1064 
1065 
1066 
1067 
1068 
1069 
1070 
1771 
1072-3 
1074 
1075 
1076 
1077 
1078 
1079-80 
1081 
1082 
1083 
1084 
1085 
1086 



M 

1071-2 

1064 

1059 
1039-40 
1041-2 
1043-4 

1047 

1049 

1048 

1058 
1053, 1051-2 

1050 
1056-7 
1250-1 

1055 

1054 
1045-6 

1008 

1010 

1027 

1028 

1009 

1036 

1031 

1032 

1030 

1033 

1034 
1024-5 

1029 

1035 

1227 

1026 

1017 
1022-3 

1018 

1019 

1020 

1014 

1015 

1016 



w 



M 



1087 


1021 


1088-9 


1037-8 


1090 


1012 


1091 


1013 


1092 


1011 


1093 


1001 


1094 


1002 


1095 


991 


1096-7 


993^ 


1098 


992 


1099 


997 


1100 


1000 


1101 


996 


1102-3 


998-9 


1104 


995 


1105 


1003 


1106 


1004 


1107 


990 


1108 


1007 


1109-10 


978-9 


1111-2 


980-1 


1113^ 


983-4 


1115 


982 


1116-7 


985-6 


1118 


987 


1119-20 


988-9 


1121 


970 


1122 


971 


1123 


972 


1124 


973 


1125-6 


976-7 


1127-8 


1005-6 


1129-30 


974-5 


1131 


1279 


1132 


1259 


1133 


1260 


1134 


1102 


1135 


1280 


1136-7 


1203-4 


1138^1 


1312-3 


1142-3 


1344-6 



537 





LUCILIUS 




w 


M 


W 


M 


1144 


1219 


1211 


1266 


1145-51 


1228-34 


1212 


1104 


1152 


1148 


1213 


1179 


1153 


1147 


1214 


1321 


1154 


1145 


1215 


1160 


1155-6 


1158-9 


1216 


1302 


1157 


1161 


1217 


1150 


1158 


1301 


1218-9 


1324-5 


1159 


1103 


1220 


1276 


1160 


1253 


1221 


1304 


1161 


1287 


1222-3 


1201-2 


1162 


1272 


1224 


1270 


1163-4 


1191-2 


1225 


1208 


1165 


1245 


1226-7 


1155-1155 a 


1166-7 


1115-6 


1228-9 


1162-3 


1168 


1193 


1230 


1206 


1169 


1118 


1231 


1196 


1170-1 


1282-3 


1232 


1183 


1172-3 


1255-6 


1233 


1167 


1174 


1224 


1234 


1288 


1175 


1221 


1235 


1205 


1176 


1128 


1236 


1290 


1177 


1105 


1237 


1318 


1178 


1271 


1238 


1164 


1179 


1222 


1239 


1307 


1180 


1267 


1240 


1316 


1181 


1323 


1241 


1172 


1182 


1186 


1242-3 


1153-4 


1183 


1248 


1244 


1185 


1184 


1121 


1245 


1194 


1185-6 


1213-4 


1246 


1195 


1187 


1268 


1247 


1247 


1188 


1197 


1248 


1275 


1189-90 


1225-6 


1249 


1305 


1191 


1171 


1250-2 


1284-6 


1192 


1281 


1253 


1246 


1193 


1220 


1254 


1170 


1194-5 


1119-20 


1255-6 


1242-3 


1196-1208 


1326-38 


1257-8 


1294-5 


1209 


1249 


1259 


1199 


1210 


1117 


1260 


1169 



538 





CONCORDANCE II 




w 


M 


w 


M 


1261 
1262 
1263 
1264 
1265-6 


1293 
1244 
1349 
1298 
1165-6 


1267-8 
1269 
1270 
1271 
1272 


1319-20 
1218 
1306 
1340 
1211 



539 



INDEX 



{Tfie numbers refer to pages) 



aall4 

Aborigines 430-1 

abzet 196-7 

Academy xi, 265 

acamae 18 

acceptor is 410 

Accius xvii. 48-9, 107, 114-5, 127-9, 

236, 272-3, 344 
aceratum 110 
aceroso 168 
Achaeans 236 
Achilles 215, 237 
acoetin {aKonLv) 178-9 
adorat 486 
adoritur 36 
Aebutia Lex 432-3 
Aegialea 357, 369 
Aemilianus see Scipio 
Aemilius 26-7 
Aemilius Lepidus 363 
Aemilius, Paullus 72-7 
Aemilius, Pons 188-9 
aera 292-3 
Aesernia 57 
Aeserninus 56-7, 59 
Aethiopus 58 
Aetnae 34 
aevitas 426 
at-yiAiTTOi 34 
Afranius 344 
Africa 247 

Agamemnon, 214-5, 237, 283-4 
Agelastus (i-yeAao-ro?) 422 
Agrion 94-5 
Ajax (son of Oileus) 215; (son of 

Telamon), 235, 237 
Alba, Alban 205, 230-1 
AJba Fucens 397 
Albesia 396 
Albinus, Aulus Postumius xviii, 393 



Albinus, Spur. Postumius 300-1, 390-3 

Albucius 18 ff. 

Albumus 38-9 

Alcmena 178-9 

algu 416 

alochoeo (a\6xo to) 10 

aluta 148-9 

ambages 388 

ambitus 466-7 

amian 398 

amphitapi (i/xi^tTaTroi) C ; araphita- 

poe 86 
Amphitryo 178-9 
amplectier 314 
amplexetur 314 
ampliter 148 
amptruet 108 
Amyclae 224^5 
Ancarius? 84-5 
Ancharius, Q. 85 
Androgyni {avipoyvvoC) 340 
Andron? 395 
anfractum 470 
angina 326 
anquina 192 
antestamino 424-5 
Antiochus III xxiv-v; Antioclius IV 

xxiv 
Antiopa 233, 235 
Anxur 204-5 

Apelles 306-7 ; Apelli 306 
a77ei//ta 314 

Apollo 10-11, 13, 82-3, 276-7 
Appian Way 35 
Appius Claudius (.decemvir) xxvii, 

464 ; Pulcher xv 
Apulia 306-7 
Apulidae, Apulian 50-1 
aiiuilum 42U 
Arab(u3) 198-9 
arceram 426-7 

541 



INDEX 



archaeotera? (apxaiorepa) 128 

a.p\ai<; 260-1 

Archelaus, Q. Lacl. xvii 

Archilochus 249, 252-3 

arduitur? 500 

ardum 242 

*Apes 'Ape? 114 

Argos 360-1 

Aristippus 265, 268-9 

Aristocrates x, 164-5 

arquatos 326 

Artemo 198-9 

ap^ptTiKO? 110 

arutaenae (apurati'ai) 8 

Asellus, Claudius 134-5 

Asia xii, 18, 25, 208-9, 211 

asparagi 42 

ast 450-1, 502 

Astynome, 282, 284 

atechnon (aTf^i-oi') 60-1 

Atellanae 131 

Atemia Tarpeia, Lex 433 

Athene 215 

Athens xxvii, xxviii, 30-1, 2G2, 2G9 

Athones 34-5 

atomus (aro^ious) 264 

Atreus 285 

Attic 413; Attica 109, 147 

Atticon 412 

Aurunca see Suessa 

auxiliatus 318 

averruncassint 214 



Babylon 158-9 

ballistas 258-9 

bisulcis 334-5 

Bitto 334-5 

blennus 336 

boa 406 

bolo 290-1 

Bovillae, Bovillanus 34-5 

bovinator 140 

broncus 34 

Brundisium 30 

Bruttace, Bruttian 46-7 

Bruttium 300 

bulga 22, 86, 226 



cacosyntheton {KaKoavvOeTov) 122 
Caeciiius, 0. xv 



Caecllius, C. (Motellus Caprarius) 

xiv, xviii, 72-3 
Caeciiius, Q. (iletellus Macedonicus) 

xvii, 72, 203, 205, 206 
Caeciiius (poet) 287 
Caelius 326-7, 410-1 
cala 316 

calda 96 ; caldum 98 
calliplocainon (»caAAi7rX6>ca/u.oi') 178 
callisphyron (Ka\\ia-(f)vpov) 178 
Calpuruia Lex 191 
Calpumius Piso, L. 190 
calvitur 180, 426 
calx 418 
Camenae 344 
Campana 419 
Campania ix, 163 
Campanus 162 
camphippi 420 
canes (Jem.) 2, 382 
canicas 246 
Cannae 305 
Caper, Flavius xxiii 
capidas 106 
Capitolia 374, 484 
Caprarius see Caeciiius 
capronae 98 

Capua 30-1, 33-5, 39, 46-7, 419 
capulare 421 

Carbo, C. Papirius xviii, 370-1 
career 382 
Carchesius 194 
carissa 419 
Carneades xi, 12-13 
Carpathian Sea 158-9 
Carpathus 159 
Carthage xvi 
carti 254 
Casinas 318 
Casinum 319 
Cassandra 214-5 
Cassiiis (Sabaco?) 140-1 
catapiratem 378 
cataplasma 310-1 
catapultas 76 
catax (Catax?) 24-5 
catillo 188 

Cato 154-5; Valerius xxiv 
Cecil ius, 72-3 

Celetes ((ceAi)?, /ceAr/Te? ?) 421 
Celtiberi 139, Celtiberic 163 
centenariae 188 
copa 68; cepe 66, 176 
coplialaea ((ce(i>aAaia) 18 
(.;ephalo 140-1 



542 



INDEX 



Cerco 110-1 

cercyram 106, 158-9 

Ceres 480-1 

cernui 250-1 ; cemuus 40-1 

chaere (xalpe) 30 

chauno meno (xavvo' juie't-co) 86 -7 

Chian (xros) 186-7 

chirodf ti(xetpi5ajT0i) 20 

Chiron 313 

Chiron(eo) 312-313 

chresin (xpTjcruO 250 

Chryseis 283-1. 215 

Chryses 282-^, 214-5 

Xfiva-C^ou 398 

cibicidas 244 

cima 318 

Cimbric xvl 

cinnabari 374-5 

Cipius 78-9 

clamides (xAa/iuSe?) 108 

clanculum 244 

Claudius Nero 306 ; see also Appius 

clepsere 380 

clinopodas (/cAti'OTroSa^) 8 

Olitomachus xi, xvii 

cobium 302-3 

Coelius 66-7 

collarei 296 

collus 96, 250 

Collyra 172, 194-5 

com 430 

Cometa, Cometes 360-1 

comitiatus 494 

commodum 290 

compace ? compage ? 464 

conbibonum 210 

condissit? 474 

Congus xvii 200-1, 220 

coniectio (collectio) causae 429-30 

couiugat 280 

conlucare 473 

conmanducatur 52 

conpernem 178 

conque tubernalera 419 

Consentia 203 

consortionem 286 

Consualia 502 

contra 294 

corago (xopa-yco) 144 

corbita 166 

cordipugis 419 

Cornelius 80-1 ; see Lupus and Scipio 

Aeinilianus 
cortinipotentis 96 
corupto 410 



Cotta, L. Aurelius 138-9 

Cotus, Cotys 172-3 

coxendicibus 322-3 

Crassus 88-9 

Crassus, L. Licinius xviii, 28-9, 88-9, 

187, 191 
Crassus, M. 422 
Crates 265 
crepera 62 
Cretaea 288-9 
Cretan 289 
Crisis 132 
Critolaus xi 
crucium 419 
cubita 172 
Cyclops 166-7, 371 
Cyllarabus, Cyllarabes 360-1 
Cynic (-s) xvi, 162, 213, 217, 245, 311, 

361 

D 
dapsilius 332 
deargentassere 204 
deblaterant 336 
decalauticare 204 
deciraano 64; decumana 186-7, 

396-7; decumanis 192; decu- 

mano 168 
Decius 368-9 
decollavi? 144-5 
decussis 406 
degrumavisti 32 
delapidassint 470 
deletionem 304 
delicet 336 
delirare 206 
Delos 38-9 
demagis 172 
depetigo 360-1 
depilati 304-5 
depoc(u)lassere 204 
depostus 44 
depuviit 378 
deque dicata 356 
deque petigo 360-1 
despeculassere 204 
desubito 134 
Deucalio 8S 
devorrere 238 
Diall 

diallaxon(SiaAA.afaji'?) 102-3 
Diana 46-7 
Aijcapxta? 38-9 
Dicarchitum, AtKaiapxta 
dicasset 326 

543 



INDEX 



diffensus 434 
dimidiatus 36 
Diogenes xi 
Diomedes 357, 3G0-1 
Diouysia 147 
Diouysius I 269 
Dirce 235 
discerniculum 354 
disertim 419 
dissociata 286-7 
disyllabou (StcruAAa^oi') 178 
domiaia 148 
domutlonis 236 
duicensus 510 
(duit 442) 

duplione decidi 480-1; d. decidito 
486, 508 



Erinys 54 

escit 426, 448, 450; escunt 502 

Etruscan see Tuscan 

Euclidcs 176 

Eufemia, S. 47 

eugio 288 

Eumenidum 54 

eupatereiam (eun-aTepeia*') 178-9 

euphona 132 

euplocamo (ev7rXo/ca/aa>) 354 

Euripides 412-3 

exactorem 230 

exanclaris 328 

excantavit 478 

exlex 22, 330 

exodiuin 130-1 

expergitus 44 

exterminare 284 



Ecbatana 158-9 

echinus 374, 398 

Egilius ? 142-3 

Egypt 396-7 

etdioAa 264 

Eisocration 60 

elephantocamelos 420 

elevit 218 

em 424 (im 482, 502) 

Emathian 16-7 

emblemate (e;u./3A.r;^aTi) 28 

Empedocles 177 

empleuron, ejan-Aeupoi' 342 

emungi 290-1 

endol80? 332, 426, 438, endoplorato 

484; eudoque plorato 510-11 
Ennius xvi, 126-7, 129-31, 275, 285, 

332, 385, 414-5 
enthymema 126 
ephebum 262 

Epicurean xvi, 221, 223, 226 
Epicurus 264-5 
km^uivei. 280 
eTTiTeuy/Lia 306—7 
eTTos 126 
epulai 148 
epulo 148 
Equirria 502 
equitarc 408 
equitatum 408-9 
erciscuiidae 454 
erctum ciere 444, 455 
ergastilus 170-1 
ergo 498, 500 

544 



Fabius Maximus Aemilianus 275, 340 

face 288 

Facelina 46-7 

facie 90, 178-9 

facul 84 

fami 144 

fandam 18 

Faunia Lex 63, 404-6 

Faniiius xiii, 362-3 ?, 404-5 

fariatur 490 

Fauni 166, 430-1. Faunus 431 

favitorem 280 

faxit 490 ; faxsit 476, 506 

ferai 50 

fervere 116 

fici 70 ; ficos 68, 70, 419 

firmiter 132, 146 

Flacci 56-7; Fulvius Flaccus 39'> 

Flavins 504-6 ; Flavius Caper xxiii 

forcti 428-9 

forum 502 

forus 48 

Fregellae 331 

frunisoor 182 

fuat 434 

Fuccntia 397 

fulgit 98 

fulguritarum 230 

fuimentas 48, 258 

Fulvius Flaccus 395 

furei 118 

Furies 55 



INDEX 



Gains 348, 368 

Gallia Narbonensis 209 

Gallonius 62-7 

gangraena 18 

gannis 92 

Gauls XXX, 506 

gausape 188 

y-i) 2G0 

Gellius xxi, xxiv 

Geminus, M. Servilius 73 fE. 

Gentius 9 J— 5 

genus 48 

gerdius 342 

gigeria (gizeria ?) 104-5 

gladium (nom.) 58 

Gnatbo 3U4-5 

Gracchan age 201, 231 

Gracchus, C. xii, xiii, 12, 85, 371 

Gracchus, Tib. xi, xviii, 249, 255 

gracila 100 

gradariua 160 

Granius xviii. 140-1, 186-7, 190-1 

Greece, Greek x:\-i, xix, xxviii, xxix, 9, 

16-7, 29-31, 3S-9, 114-5, 237, 239, 

254-5, 257, 276-7 
guberna 194 
gumiae 334 
gutturem 400 
gutulliocae 419 

H 
halicarius 168 
Hannibal 228-9, 305-7 
Helen 178-9 
helops 396 
herbilis 152 
heredium 468 
Hermodorus xxvii-xxix 
herpestica 18 
Hibera 136, 158, 162 
hilo 156 ; hilum 352 
Homer 126-8, 130-1, 166-7, 177 
Horace x, xx 
Hortensius 24-5, 384-5 
hortus 468 
Hostilius xviii, 24-5 
Hyacinthus 96-7 
Hymnis 286-9, 378-81 
hvpereticos (vT^jperc/cos) 421 



laniis 10 
lapydes 327 



Icadion 62 

icterus 14 

idiotam 216 

igitur 424-5 

igiiaviter 176 

Ilias (Iliad) 126 

illei 118-9 

iin 482, 502 

impuno 20-1 

inbalaitie 234 

inberbi 340 

inbubinat 384 

inbulbitat 384 

incantassit 474-5 

incerniculum? 204-5 

incilans 348 

incita 36, 164 

indu 362, 372 

iners 150 

inperfunditie 234 

inrigarier 222 

internecionem 36 

intestabilis 490 

irascier 212 

Irus 181 

Isocrates 61 

Italians 331 

Italv, Italian x. xii, xiii, xiv, xvi, 

xiix, 30, 203, 306-7, 428, 501 
lugTirtini 142 
iumentum 426-7 
lunius Gongus xvli, 200-1, 220 
lunius Pennus, xiii, xiv, 331 
luDpiter 66, 88 
iusti 436 
Ixion IE 
Ixionies ('I^ioftr)?) 10 



Jason 312-3 

Jugurtha, xv, xvi, xviii, 143, 393 

Junius see lunius 

Jupiter 67, 89, 148-9, 172-3, 507 

Juvenal xix, xx 



•? 178 



labeas 196 

lacuar 420 

lacus 402 

Laelius, C. xvii, 63-6, 202 



545 



LUCILIUS 



NN 



INDEX 



Laelius, Decirnus xvii, 202-3 

Laclius, Q. Archelaus XTJi 

Laevius 66-7 

lambcrat 198-9 

Lamia 334-5 

Lamias 166 

lance et licio 4S-i-7 

lapathi 64 

laterem 205 

Latins ix, 130-1 

Latinus 431 

Latium 431 

Latona 55 

latrina (j)l.) 88 ; (sing.) 136 

Laverna 176 

lavit 86 

Leda 10-1 

legassit 446-7 

lentet 102 

Lentulus see Lupus 

Leonidas? 200-1 

Leoutiada? 200-1 

lerodes (\r)pw8e';) 60 

lessum 497-8 

lexis (Ae^eis) 28 

Liber 10 

Liberalia 146 

Liciuian law 188-9 

Licinius? 120-1; see Ct&ssus 

Ligurians 73 

Liparae 46-7 

Livy xxviii, xxx 

locassint 494 

Lucani, Lucanian 82-3 

Luciliades 422 

Lucilius, C. vii ff., 246, 254-5, 262-3, 

300-1, 349, etc. 
Lucilius, Manius 144 
luperis 78 
Lupus, L. Cornelius Lentulus xiii, 

xTii-viii, 3-5, 15-7, 260-1, 366-7, 

370-1 
lurcaretur 24 
lurcones 24 
Lusitanians 99 
Ivchnos 8 
Lycus 235 
Lydians 6-7 
lympborem 400 
Lysippus 172-3 



Macedo 94-5 
Macedonia 16 



macellus 80 

Macnius 368-71 

Mapo 246-7 

malt(h)am 240-1 

Mamilia Lex 468-9 

niamj>bulas 342 

^Mancinus 397 

mandonum 318 

manducamur 152 

manpo 290-1 

Manilius 200-1 

Manlius 24-5 

mantica 32 

mantisa 398 

Marius 67 

Mars 10 

Marsian(s) 53, 190-1 

Maticnus 77 

Maximus Aemilianus 274-5, 34 

mechanici 414 

meiraciodes (ju.eipa*ct(L5es) 60 

meille, meillia 120 

Memmius 85 

mercedimerae 6 

:\Ieropa 412-3 

ilessana 46-7 

Metaurus 307 

metaxa 378 

Metelli 204-5 

Metellus see Caecilius 

Metrophanes, x, 196-7 

mictilis 334-5 

Minerva 214-5 

minutim 76 

miserinum 242 

moecbocinaedi 340 

meet i no 24 

mouerint 214 

monogrammi 240 monogrammo 20-1 

monstrificabile 234 

mu 142 

Mucins Scaevola xir, xviii, IS ff., 88, 

366-7, 369 
muco (ixvxw) 332 
muginamur 96 
Mummius 135 
mundum (iieut.) 174 
Musco 34G-7 
Muses 176, 273, 344-5 
musimonem 88-9 
muttires 216 
Mutto, Q. 347 
muttoni 102 
muttonium 418 
Mvconos 416-7 



546 



INDEX 



Mylae 47 
mysteria 216 



N 



Naevius 410-1 

Daiicitor 510 

Naples XT, xvi 

nasum (^neiit.) 193, 314 

natricem 22 

naumachiam 156 

ne (interjection) 128 

nefantia 44, 286 

neminis 344 

Keptunus 10, 12-3, 370-1 

Xereus 72-3 

nexit 76 

noctipugram 384-5 

noenu 362 

Nomentanus 26-9 

Xonius riii, xxi ff. ; passim. 

Xostius 28-9 

nox 482 

Nucula 368-9 

Kuiua 166-7 

Numantia 137, 275, 403 

Kumantine (s) x, xi, xii, 139, 229, 397 

Xumerius 410-1 

nuncupassit 456-7 

nupturum 178 

nutricatum 324 



obtursi 54 

obvagulat'om 436-7 

occaso 20 ; occasus 430-1 

occentare 474-5 ; occentassit 474 

occisit 482 

Ocrisia 80-1 

oenophori 42 

olit 152 

olios 494 

ta)fj.0Tpt/3e'? 318 

Opimius, L. xr, xviii. 143 

Opimius, Q. 142-3 

Orbilius 120-1 

Orcus 12, 210 

Orestes 184-5 

Oscan ix, 197, 393, 403 

ostrea (fern, sina.) 40 ; (neut. ■pi.) 110, 

146, 398 
Oufente 368 
Oufentina 368 
oxyodontes (o^voSoires) 334 



Paceaius xrii, 138-9 

Pacicleianus 56-9, 114-5 

Pacilius, X, 196-7 

pacit 476 ; pacunt 428-9 

Pacuvius xvii, 73, 214-5, 233 ff. ; 282- 

4, 413 
Paeta«, Aelius xxix, xxx 
Palantine War 362-3 
Palinurus, Cape Palinuro 35, 40-1, 47 
palpatur 292 
paluinbes 152 
Pamphilus 320-1 
Papiria 366-7 
Papirius Carbo xviii, 370-1 
pareutactoe (napevTaKToi) 108-9 ; 

pareutacton 262 
pascal i 408 
pasceolum 148 
pathicam 204 
patriai 392 

pedes {from pedis) 292-3 
pedicum (TraiStKoi/) 22 
peila 120 
Penelope 179 
peniculamentum 184 
Pennus, lunius xiii, xiv, 331 
pensi 266 
percrepa 228 
Pergamuxa 159 
permitie 294 

Persius, C. 200-3; the satirist xis 
pertisum 316 
petauristae 414 
petilis 196 
petimen 50-1 
Philocomus see Vettius 
Phryne 90-1 
physici 216 
pigror 134 
PLnaria Lex, 505 
plstrices 421 
pistrina (/i£7«.) 174 
pistrix 342, 421 

TiViVIXa 260 

poerrial26; poemata352; poesi3l26 

poenitur 494 

Polemon 264-5 

Polyphemus 166-7 

Polyphonies 412-3 

polypus 298-9 

Pompeius Strabo x 

Pompey the Great x 

Pontius 30-1 

547 



INDEX 



Popillius Laeiias 99, 228-9 

percent 80 

portus 435-7 

post i cum 100 

Postuniius 4-5 ; see Albinus 

pote 2J58 

potesse 390; potisse 64; potisset 

Cpotissitv)4, 8, 64, 340 
potissuut 386 
potitur 66 
praeceidit 94 
praeciso 190 
praecoca 32 

Praeneste, Praenestines 368-71 
premo (noiin?) 320 
pretor 72-3 
primitus 68 
priva 18 

Privernum 368-9 
prodigitas 84 
proseciam 154 
prostomis? 164-5 
protelo (noun) 82, 146 
psilae 6 

v//ojAoK07ro>"Mat 102 
publiceis 206 
publicitus 144, 174, 328 
Publius 80-1 see Scipio Aemilianus 
Publius Gallonius 64-5 
Publius Tuditanus 158 
puellus 54, 142 
puerei 118 
pullo 320 

Punic War, First 515 
Puteoli 38-9 
Pyrgensia, Pyrgi 384-5 



quandoc 510 
quartarius 380 
queis 92 

quer^era 62, 406 
quintana 376-7 
Quirinus 10 
quiritans 84 

R 
ramite 110 

rayiinator ( ? rapister) 20 
ratiti 378-9 
rausuro 184-5 
ravi 420 

redanii)truet 108 
Regina 46 



Regium xiv, 46-7 

remilluni 194 

remoram 320 

repedabam 204 ; repedasse 202 

repostor? 62 

p7j(Te;?? 254 

reus 434-5 

Rhegium see Regiuju 

rhetoricoterus (prjTopiffoiTepo?) 28 

rhinoceros 34 ; rinocerus 58 

Rhodes 158-9 

Rhondes 62-3 

ricae 20 

rodus 378 

Roman, Rome x-xiii, xri, rviii, 
xxvi-xxxi, 4-5, 30-1, 48-9, 62, 79, 
85, 106, 111, 113, 142-3, 153, 155, 
163, 177, 181. 202-3, 221, 22S-9, 
236, 256-7, 274, 305, 325, 345, 
375, 383, 403, 405, 428-9, 431, 441, 
445, 452-3, 462, 494 

Romulia 367 

rupsit 476, 478 

rutai 42 

rutellum 108 

Rutilius Rufus, Publius 202-3 



Sabine 30-1, 370-1 

sacramentum 432-3 

saga 90 

Salerna, Salernum 38-9 

Salii 107-9 

sam 470 

Samian 94-5, 148-9 

Samiiis, Samnite 56-9 

Samnium 306 

sanates, sanati 428-9 

saperda 16 

sarcinator 270 

Sardinia(n) x, xiv, 88-9 

sargus 396 

sarpta 466 

sartas tectas ditia? 208 

satias 310 

salura xii 

[Saturnalia 405 

Saturnus 10 

saxei 412 

scaberat 110 

Scaevola, Mucius see Mucius 

scelerosus 14 

schediuni 366-7 



54S 



INDEX 



schema 130, 312-3 

Scipiada« 134; Scipiadas 80 

Scipio Aemilianus xi, xii, xvii, xviii, 12 

30, 79-81, 134-5, 137, 159, 202-3, 

228-9, 255, 316-7, 329, 331, 368-9, 

403 
Scipio Africanus 307 
Scipio Nasica 159 
scripturarius 208 
scutam 70 

se ( = sine) 440, 502 
secunto? 440 

seis 28 ; siem 226 ; sies 390 ; siet 10 
semnos (<reju.fa)s) 8 
senectam 270 
Servilius C. 275 
Servilius, M. 73 ff. 
Servius Tullius 79-81 
sestertius pes 46G 
Setia, Setinum 34-5 
Sicilv, Sicilian, Siculi x, xiv, xxix, 

30-1, 88-9, 202-3, 211, 213 
SicTonia 374 

siem 226 : sies 390 ; siet 10 
Sieillaria 79 
signatam 282-3 
Silanis 38-9 
silurus 16 
simat 92 

simeitu 96; simitu 354 
singilatim 182 
Socrates 307-9 
Socratic 254-5, 268-9 
sollo 402-3 
soloce 408 

soloecismon (croAot/cicrjad)v) 124 
Solon xxvii. xxviii 
sophista 392 
sophos 64 
Spain, Spanish si, xri, 99, 107, 137, 

153, 159, 161-3, 275, 363, 397 
statuiiber 458-61 
status 434 
stlembi 50 
Stoic(s) xri. 162, 207, 209, 217, 311, 

359, 361, 389, 393 
stoechia (arotxeta) 260-1 
stomis? 164-5 
Stroniboli 47 
struere pedem 426-7 
Sublicius pons 188-9 
sublucare 473 
subpilo (jionn ?) 320 
subplantare 276-7 
subsicira 264 



sab vos placo 510 
succidere 483 
succusato.-is 50 
succussor 162 
Suessa Aurunca ix, xi 
sumti 340 
suppus 298 
Sura? 372 

Symmac(h)us x, 44-5 
Syra 40-1 
Syracuse 148-9 
SvTophoenix 170-1 
Syrus 208-9 



Tables, Twelve xxvi ff., 181, 424 ff. 
tagax 346-7 
tama 406-7 
Tantalus 44-5 
Tappo 404-5 
Tappula Lex 404-5 
Tarentines 202-3 
Tarentum 172-3 
Tarpeian Rock 484, 490-1 
Terence 239 
Terentia 120-1 
Terentilius xxvii 
tesorophylax (0r)craupo(^uAa^) 196 
testarier"490 
Teutonic xri 
Theognis 316-7 
Thermopvlae 200-1 
Thersites" 236-7 
eeVt? 126 
Thessalian 338-9 
Thestiados 10 
Thestius 11 
Thoria Lex xv 
Thvestes 285, 287 
Tiber 188-9, 438-9 
Tiberinus 188 

•Tiresia, Tiresiai 70; Tiresias 71«* 
Tisipbone 54-5 
Tityos 54-5 

tocoglyphos (TOKoy\v4)o<;) 170 
tolutim 106 
tonsillas 132 
toracia (OtopaKia) 20 
transque dato 510 
Trebellius 168-9 
trepidantei 356 
trico 138 
tricorius 208-9 
tricosus 140 



549 



INDEX 



Tritanus 30-1 

Trocrinus 330-1 

Troy 23G-7, 360-1 

Tubulus, L. xviii, 370-1 

Tuditanus, C. Sempronius 327 

Tullius, Q. 140-1 

Tullius, Servius 79-81 

Tvpa> 179 

Tuscan 222-3, 370-1 

Tusculans, Tusculidarum 366-7 

Ttcehe Tables xxvi ff., 181, 424 IT. 

tjroneo? 312 

U 

Ufens, Ufentine 368-9 
^Ulixen 178 — 
-Ulysses 179, ISl, 237, 356-^ 

utare uith ace. 160 



Yatia 275 

vegrancJi 226-7 

vei 228 

venumduit 442 

Venus 360-1 

versipellis 208-9 

Vestal Virgins 444-5 

Vettius Philocomus ivii, rsii, 370-1 

viai 138, 354 

vindicit 438 

vinibuae 418 

Viriatlms 228-9, 365, 397 

Volturnus 34-5 

Vulcaniam 236 

vulturius 14 



Senocrates 265 



Valerius 404-5 ; Valerius Cato xsiv 
vallo? 382-3 
vappones 421 
Varro xxi ff. 
vatax 274-5 



Zama 306-7 

zetematium (^r)T>}/u.aTio»') 216 

zonarius 342 

zonatim 86 

Zopjriatim 112 

Zopvrion 113, 196-7 



550 



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ISOCRATES. George Norlin. 3 Vols. Vols. I. and II. 
JOSEPHUS. H. St. J. Thackeray and Ralph Marcus. 

9 Vols. Vols. I.-VI. (Vol. V. 2nd Imp.) 
JULIAN. Wilmer Cave Wright. 3 Vols. (Vols. I. and 

II. 2nd Imp.) 
LUCIAN. A. M. Harmon. 8 Vols. Vols. I.-V. (Vols. 

I. and II. -^rd Imp.) 
LYCOPHRON. Cf. CALLIMACHUS. 
LYRA GRAECA. J. M. Edmonds. 3 Vols. (Vol. I. 

3;yZ Imp., Vol. II. 2nd Ed. revised and enlarged.) 
LYSIAS. W. R. M. Lamb. 

MARCUS AURELIUS. C. R. Haines, {^rd Imp. revised.) 
MENANDER. F. G. Allinson. {2nd Imp. revised.) 
MINOR ATTIC ORATORS (ANTIPHON, ANDOCIDES, 

DEMADES, DEINARCHUS. HYPEREIDES). K. 

r^Iaidment. 2 Vols. Vol. I. 
OPPIAN, COLLUTHUS, TRYPHIODORUS. A. W. Mair. 
PAPYRI (SELECTIONS). A. S. Hunt and C. C. Edgar. 

4 Vols. Vols. I. and II. 
PARTHENIUS. Cf. DAPHNIS and CHLOE. 
PAUSANIAS : DESCRIPTION OF GREECE. W. H. S. 

Jones. 5 Vols, and Companion Vol. (Vol. I. 2nd Imp.) 
PHILO. 10 Vols. Vols. I.-V.; F. H. Colson and Rev. 

G. H. Whitaker. Vols. VI. and VII. ; F. H. Colson. 
PHILOSTRATUS : THE LIFE OF APOLLONIUS OF 

TYANA. F. C. Conybeare. 2 Vols. (Vol. I. ?,rd Imp., 

Vol. II. 2nd Imp.) 
PHILOSTRATUS : IMAGINES ; CALLISTRATUS : 

DESCRIPTIONS. A. Fairbanks. 
PHILOSTRATUS and EUNAPIUS : LIVES OF THE 

SOPHISTS. Wilmer Cave Wright. 
PINDAR. Sir J. E. Sandys. {6th Imp. revised.) 
PLATO : CHARMIDES, ALCIBIADES. HIPPARCHUS, 

THE LOVERS, THEAGES. MINOS and EPINOMIS. 

W. R. M. Lamb. 
PLATO : CRATYLUS, PARMENIDES. GREATER HIP- 

PIAS, LESSER HIPPIAS. H. N. Fowler. 
6 



PLATO : EUTHYPHRO, APOLOGY, CRITO, PHAEDO, 

PHAEDRUS. H. N. Fowler. (Sth Imp.) 
PLATO : LACHES, PROTAGORAS, MENO. EUTHY- 

DEMUS. W. R. M. Lamb. (2vd Imp. revised.) 
PLATO : LAWS. Rev. R. G. Bur^^ 2 Vols. 
PLATO : LYSIS, SYMPOSIUM. GORGIAS. W. R. M. 

Lamb. {2nd Imp. revised.) 
PLATO : REPUBLIC. Paul Shorey. 2 Vols. (Vol. I. 

2nd Imp. revised.) 
PLATO: STATESMAN. PHILEBUS. H. X. Fowler; 

ION. W. R. M. Lamb. 
PLATO : THEAETETUS and SOPHIST. H. N. Fowler. 

{2nd Imp.) 
PLATO : TIMAEUS, CRITIAS, CLITOPHO. MENEXE- 

XUS, EPISTULAE. Rev. R. G. Bury. 
PLUTARCH: MORALIA. F. C. Babbitt and H. N. 

Fowler. 14 Vols. Vols. I.-V. and X. 
PLUTARCH : THE PARALLEL LIVES. B. Perrin. 

II Vols. (Vols. I., II., III. and VII. 2nd Imp.) 
POLYBIUS. W. R. Paton. 6 Vols. 
PROCOPIUS : HISTORY OF THE WARS. H. B . 

Dewing. 7 Vols. Vols. I.-VI. (Vol. I. 27td Imp.) 
QUIXTUS SMYRXAEUS. A. S. Way. Verse trans. 
ST. BASIL : LETTERS. R. J. Deferrari. 4 Vols. 
ST. JOHX DAMASCEXE : BARE A AM AND lO ASAPH. 

Rev. G. R. Woodward and Harold Mattingly. {2nd 

Imp. revised.) 
SEXTUS EMPIRICUS. Rev. R. G. Bury. 3 Vols. 
SOPHOCLES. F. Storr. 2 Vols. (Vol. I. 6th Imp., Vol. 

II. ^th Imp.) Verse trans. 
STRABO : GEOGRAPHY. Horace L. Jones. 8 Vols. 

(Vols. I. and VIII. 2nd Imp.) 
THEOPHRASTUS : CHARACTERS. J.M.Edmonds; 

HERODES, etc. A. D. Knox. 
THEOPHRASTUS : EXQUIRY IXTO PLAXTS. Sir 

Arthur Hort, Bart. 2 Vols. 
THUCYDIDES. C. F. Smith. 4 Vols. (Vol. I. 3rd Imp.. 

Vols. II., III. and IV. 2nd Imp. revised.) 
TRYPHIODORUS. Cf. OPPIAX. 
XEXOPHOX : CYROPAEDIA. Walter Miller. 2 Vols. 

{2nd Imp.) 
XEXOPHOX : HELLEXICA, AXABASIS, APOLOGY, 

AXD SYMPOSIUM. C. L. Brownson and O. J. Todd. 

3 Vols. {2nd Imp.) 
XEXOPHOX : MEMORABILIA and OECOXO^IICUS. 

E. C. Marchant. {2nd Imp.) 
XEXOPHOX : SCRIPTA MIXORA. E. C. Marchant. 



IN PREPARATION 



Greek Authors 

ALCIPHRON. A. R. Benner. 

ARISTOTLE : DE CAELO. etc. W. K. C. Guthrie. 

ARISTOTLE : METEOROLOGICA. H. P. Lee. 

MANETHO. W. G. Waddell. 

NONNUS. W. H. D. Rouse. 

PAPYRI : LITERARY PAPYRI, Selected and Translated 
by D. L. Page. 

PTOLEMY : TETRABIBLUS. F. E. Robbins. 



Latin Authors 

CICERO : AD HERENNIUM. H. Caplan. 

CICERO : DE ORATORE. Charles Stuttaford and 
W. E. Sutton. 

CICERO : BRUTUS, ORATOR. G. L. Hendrickson and 
H. M. Hubbell. 

CICERO : PRO SESTIO, IN VATINIUM, PRO 
CAELIO, DE PROVINXIIS CONSULARIBUS, PRO 
BALBO. J. H. Freese. 

COLUMELLA : DE RE RUSTICA. H. B. Ash. 

PRUDENTIUS. J. H. Baxter. 

QUINTUS CURTIUS : HISTORY OF ALEXANDER. 
J. C. Rolfe. 

DESCRIPTIVE PROSPECTUS ON APPLICATION 



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